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One Last Roll of the Dice,...errr a Tuna?


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So for about a year now I've been trying to get on with Hansen in Guam to fly off Tuna Boats. ;)

 

In many conversations with their Chief Pilot it seems his main concern (other than my lack of tail-wind landing experience) is my willingness to stick it out for a whole year (seems the conditions on the boat are so dreadfull most of us "Americans" bail after just a month or so). :wacko:

 

Anyway, I was thinking that if I just showed up unannounced it may prove to him that yes, I am willing to stick it out, since he knows just how expensive it would be to fly out there (as he has mentioned it several times)? Kind of "putting my money where my mouth is", in the hopes of impressing him? :huh:

 

This leads to my actual question;

 

Does anyone have Hansen's street address?

 

All I can find on the website is a P.O. Box,...and I'd hate to spend more money than I make in a year to get there only to find out that they don't have a physical office on Guam! :o

:)

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Do you come close to this?

 

Minimum Requirements: 500 hours PIC flight time in helicopters and the ability to fly to commercial standards. 100 hours of turbine time and 25 hours in MD500 preferred

 

Landing a 500 on a moving boat while cross wind, cruising at 15 plus knots with swells, and putting her down in a confined landing pad doesn't seem to me like a good first job for anyone.

 

Plenty of videos on YouTube to watch for yourself. But sorry, no address.

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720 tt, 10 turbine, 0.7 MD500, but for what its worth (not much I know :lol: ) I have over 500 hours of solo stick time, and I've flown with Boatpix (which he seemed to like).

 

I've seen the videos and yes I would agree that its a bit harry for a first job. However he's been willing to talk to me any time I've called (which is more than I can say for 99.9999999% of everyone else with whom I've tried) so it seems to be my last hope? :huh:

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You might want to choose your words carefully, especially if you have no idea of the conditions that surround that whole job.

 

No aircraft maitenance records on boat, confined living conditions with 1-2 bunk mates, your food is what they serve on the boat plus what you can bring with you from the ports, fighting to get paid on time from Hansen, being about the only english speaking person on the ship aside from maybe the mechanic, and everything else in between.

 

At my last employer, i had ran into a pilot who ended up getting hired as one of our contract fire pilots for the summer. He spent a year with hansen before coming to us and wouldnt ever do it again. He had some stories.

 

If you want to try for it, do it. Worst case is that you pay your ticket out and pay your ticket back.

 

Id be careful about trying to impress an employer before you even get hired or step into an aircraft for him/her. Hazardous attitude!

Edited by RagMan
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r22butters:

If nobody comes across with a better point of contact, try the corporate registrations at the secretary of state's office in the company's home state.

 

I applaud the effort if you've considered the scenario carefully. If you stick it out, a year isn't forever. At the very least, you'll have some really good stories (and hours).

 

Never did the tuna boat thing, but I have landed on boats (ships, whatever- talk to the hand) and it's a challenge.

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I did just what you’re proposing…. Although, at the time, I was aiming for Big Eye Helicopters but, visited Hansen (in Harmon) often to include hanging with one of their pilots who just finished a yearly contact and 10K in his pocket which I gladly helped him spend...….. Yeah, traveling to Guam, with no job offer, and hung around to see what I could generate... I did just that…… Exactly…..

Edited by Spike
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Does anyone have Hansen's street address?

 

All I can find on the website is a P.O. Box,...and I'd hate to spend more money than I make in a year to get there only to find out that they don't have a physical office on Guam! :o

:)

 

Back in the day, Hansen ran operations (Part 91 & 145 Repair Station) from an industrial park next to the flea market. They would often put you up at the Harmon Loop Hotel, short drive from their the shop. Google Earth 13º 30.404N x 144º 49.076E

 

The guy you've been talked with at Hansen should be able to help. Moreover, it's a small island and most any taxi driver know how to get you to Hansen Helicopters.

 

That guy in the light blue shirt at the rotor head is Jon Walker.. He ran Hansen for many years, he may still.

 

Hopefully they're still there

 

Scan-1%201_zpsyewjmnf1.jpg

 

Screen%20Shot%202015-04-05%20at%2011.19.

 

What's going on in the hanger these days.....

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EcQYF8JyqcY&feature=youtu.be

Edited by iChris
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You’re missing one desired qual…. I’ll let you figure out what it is….

 

Plus, Guam isn’t cheap. Airfare alone is about $2500, round trip, which is good to have. Living expenses are similar to Hawaii, if not more. I survived by living as frugal as possible. After about 21 days, I eventually got a job as a mechanic and rented a room in a condo complex with 2 school teachers but, if this didn’t happen, I was out of cash and on a plane back to Hawaii……

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That sounds like a cool gig man.

 

I'm sitting at about 2,000 TT 1,300 pic and I've got some deck landings under my belt. I couldn't even imagine trying to land on a small deck in pitching seas with your hour level, never mind the tailwind just try landing that damn thing without hitting the ships rigging.

 

Anyways, sounds like an adventure if you can get the job.

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I did it with about 800 hours TT with approximately 6 hours in type (500)….

 

IMHO, without a doubt, it’s not about “deck landing” experience. And, while I’m not sure of the jest of the “tailwind landing” conversation, it would seem to me, it’s one of those “thanks-but-no-thanks” excuses. With that and, it should go without saying, if your asked this question, the answer should have been; “I land downwind all the time!”…………

Edited by Spike
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Bear in mind that when you go, you won't be going to impress the employer. The gesture is an I'll-do-whatever-it-takes demonstration of your willingness to abide, but there is nothing in your experience at this level which is going to impress anyone. Keep that firmly in mind, especially if you get the job. It's very easy to slip past caution to overconfidence, and that's far more expensive than living costs in Guam.

 

As Spike noted, if you're really serious about the job, then look it over closely, and then take what's given. Whether it's a deck hand, mechanic, or pilot. If you're not absolutely sure you can do the job, then finding out in the big blue sea may not be your best move.

 

The saving grace is that you're talking to someone who's accustomed to working with inexperienced aviators, and that may be your biggest strength, and also your biggest weakness in the deal. When you're in a corner and broke and can't afford to go home (remember the round trip ticket that Spike mentioned), when an employer has you by the short hairs in a remote island paradise, especially if you feel like it's your last shot (it's not), you may feel pressured to do what you really ought not. Guard against that. You are your only protection.

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What AvBug says X100….. (He says it far better than I can)….

 

Moreover, of the 800-ish hours I had, 600 was that of a CFI….. Yep, as an instructor….. Furthermore, the additional qualification desired I mentioned above is an A&P (personally, I had the MD 500 maintenance factory cert, at $1500 plus expenses as well to posture myself for a tuna boat position). Even so, when I arrived, I was told to go home by everyone. Big Eye, Hanson and Tropical……..

 

Basically, getting the CFI and getting hired was way easier, and cheaper, than getting on a tuna boat. And, the expectations and risks were far less as a CFI….

 

You’ve been a participant in this forum for years (this was your 978th post). IMHO, you seek the easy way and tuna boats are far from that… However, you’ve doubted, and rejected advice from myself and others multiple times before, so why start listening to us now?...... Book the flight and forge your own path....

Edited by Spike
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You know the biggest thing I noticed about this thread? Butters doesn't have his usual "woe is me" attitude. I don't hear him coming up with all kinds of reasons why he isn't a working pilot, and the helicopter industry is against him. And guess what? A REAL conversation developed, with REAL advice! It's quite refreshing actually. Butters, I hope you have noticed the difference too. Look how willing the experienced pilots (not me, everyone else who chimed in) is to help when you have the right attitude. Now just take it one more step...............try to ween yourself off of the emoticons...............haha. Good luck with whatever you decide to do.

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Butters,

 

Was it you that suffered from getting airsick initially?

 

Does that still exist?

 

I mention this because being on a ship in changing seas may have an effect on your ability to fly/perform safely.

 

Best Wishes,

 

Mike

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Butters,

 

Was it you that suffered from getting airsick initially?

 

Does that still exist?

 

I mention this because being on a ship in changing seas may have an effect on your ability to fly/perform safely.

 

Best Wishes,

 

Mike

 

Yes I'm the airsick passenger, however I have been on several boats big and small and never gotten seasick, so I may as well give it a shot.

:wacko:

 

iChris, thanks for the map.

:)

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Better Link is this one: www.chopperstories.com

 

And scroll down the page to "Moggy's Tunaboat Helicopter Manual"

 

:huh:

Edited by Francis Meyrick
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;)

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