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Different idea/approach, becoming a helicopter-specific technician/mechanic.


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So while I continue to find different ways of going about becoming an actual pilot, I was also wondering about how to get into repair and maintenance of any particular machine.
Would any one here happen to know of a particular community college, public/not-for-profit preferrably, that has a decent program that covers helicopter repair/maintenance.

I've been to a few colleges in SoCal that had UH-1 Hueys on their premises for their aviation tech programs.
But wondered if one particular wrenching program was better than the other.
Career-change and cost-wise, the maintenance side of helicopters doesn't seem too bad to get into.

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To my knowledge,there are very few, if any, helicopter specific A&P schools. Fortunately for you, the helicopter industry is not that picky, nor can they afford to be.... With that, go to a school which offers the most affordable A&P program….. Any community college program would suffice….. After that, the helo stuff will come from OTJ experience...

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Guest pokey

there was a thread on this a while back, search and you shall find. The A&P has nothing to do with helicopters,, its just a license--you will learn about helicopters by working on them next to knowledgeable people and attending the factory schools, but? you will most likely need the FAA license to do that,, so? Find the cheepest and fastest way to get it.

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not a new idea or different. If you want to be a pilot focus on that first and foremost. Becoming an A&P is a great trade and skill but it will rarely transition into a pilot job. If anything I would suggest starting your pilot training and working on the side with a heli op as an apprentice as no formal school is required to aquire the a&p. That way you can learn about helicopters, get paid and continue to work on your goal of piloting.

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Thanks for the replies, again, all.
I've found the closest school in my area to be Amarillo College and their A/P program.

I figure I'll go up there and check it out to see what they got.
Perhaps I'll also beat around and check out the various heli-ops for the apprenticeships available.


As for the piloting thing, I'm finding I'm getting the run-around with the Vertical Limit place out of ABQ.
I ask about ways to keep myself trained in the smaller, R22 bird they have(I'm 220 down from 230, slowly getting it down through various means. Starvation, eating only apples/water, weight lifting to boost metab,. etc).
I did inquire about perhaps pairing me with a lighter instructor as I continue to get it down, but they seemed to be silent on the issue.
But, they seem to be extremely pushy about only using their higher-cost, R44 for all of the PPL, on up to the Commercial ratings.
They stress the safety concerns of flying in the high altitude area of ABQ and the nearby Sandias.
They pretty much seem to have a monopoly in the area.

All in all, this seems to be pushing me into having to relocate once more to an area that actually has all these needs.
But, I'll just treat it as a second yob and make sure it doesn't time-conflict with my trucking roles.

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If they won't train you in the 22 due to your weight I'd be willing to bet they won't hire you either!?

 

There are plenty of cfis below 175 to fly with you...I see ads for them often. Keep searching you'll find the right school.

Definitely calling around and checking out some other schools, along with financing options.

Figure keep working my regular job while getting the training done in order to not let anything balloon out of control, debt-wise.

 

Weight-wise, I'm dropping inches off the waist as the weight-lifting regimens I've been following have dropped me from size 40, down to 36 in a few months.

But then, the muscle density....

 

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As for the piloting thing, I'm finding I'm getting the run-around with the Vertical Limit place out of ABQ.

I ask about ways to keep myself trained in the smaller, R22 bird they have(I'm 220 down from 230, slowly getting it down through various means. Starvation, eating only apples/water, weight lifting to boost metab,. etc).

I did inquire about perhaps pairing me with a lighter instructor as I continue to get it down, but they seemed to be silent on the issue.

But, they seem to be extremely pushy about only using their higher-cost, R44 for all of the PPL, on up to the Commercial ratings.

 

 

 

 

Albuquerque is a mile above sea level. Seek training at a lower elevation facility. Or seek training in a more capable aircraft.

 

Maintenance isn't really a different idea or approach; quite a few of us who fly for a living are also mechanics. I do both.

 

There is no helicopter-specific maintenance rating issued by the FAA; the mechanic certificate has two available ratings. Airframe is one, powerplant is the other.

 

If you want helicopter specific maintenance training, the US Army, Navy, or Marines will be happy to help train you.

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Albuquerque is a mile above sea level. Seek training at a lower elevation facility. Or seek training in a more capable aircraft.

 

Maintenance isn't really a different idea or approach; quite a few of us who fly for a living are also mechanics. I do both.

 

There is no helicopter-specific maintenance rating issued by the FAA; the mechanic certificate has two available ratings. Airframe is one, powerplant is the other.

 

If you want helicopter specific maintenance training, the US Army, Navy, or Marines will be happy to help train you.

Spot on with all of those.

But the military service thing isn't my cup of tea.

 

 

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But in that case you won't find helicopter specific aircraft mechanic training, outside of factory schools.

True on that one.

But like one of the posters mentioned above, there are some apprenticeship options available with certain locations.

Now it's all just a matter of "growing some", relocating(again), and taking the hit in the wallet.

 

I'm beginning to think before I do anything drastic, I should focus on getting my pickup paid off first.

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