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How many hours do people normally fly in a R22 before getting their license?


username16

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Not normal at all. Now there are people out there who will never "get it" and actually be able to do this. I could see if you were at 70 hours and not ready for checkride. But to be that many hours into it and only soloed in the pattern is a huge red flag. I believe without knowing more though that it's not possible to say whether the issue is in your abilities or the quality of instruction. If the issue is that you are struggling that much, then your school should have talked with you long ago about perhaps choosing something else to do with your life. If the issue is with the quality of instruction / milking you for more money then that's obvious what you need to do. In either case though, you need to have a talk with whoever is in charge at your school.

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While I would say that 70 hours is a little unusual I don't want to say that it is the end all be all. There needs to be a little more info here. How do you feel YOU are doing? Without being your instructor or watching the interaction between you two it's kind of hard to say that you are not on track for your individual learning. While rare, I did have a student once that took almost 40 hours to solo, and then about another 20 or so for XC's and he was around 110 for his checkride. It happens, not every student will be the same and some take longer then others. However, we had a lot of conversations about what his plans were and if this was right for him and my opinions about him continuing (My recommendation was for him to stop, based on how I felt his learning abilities were) and we also had a couple other instructors fly with him to make sure it wasn't just me that was holding him back. If your instructor hasn't had any of those conversations and is just milking you then you need to consider questioning them or getting another instructor for a second opinion. Everyone is different and maybe you'll progress faster with a different instructor. Sometimes the answer isn't what you want to hear and maybe you just are not cut out for this (It happens) but sometimes it is. Get a second or third opinion on your flying, then decide what to to.

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I can't tell if that's a legitimate question or if its just someone just trying to stir up some poop.

 

Either way, imho, 70 hours to solo in a pattern is not normal... assuming that you train more than a few times a month. Typically the bigger the gap between lessons, the longer it will take.

 

Furthermore, it's extremely rare to find a person who just doesn't possess the skills to get their private certificate. Some people are more of a challenge than others, but I'd guess the odds are about the same as finding someone who can't learn to ride a bicycle.

 

Or... as was previously stated, it might have something to do with your instructor. Different instructors teach the same thing different ways. Different styles, different ways to explain or demonstrate the same maneuver, and different life experiences that you might relate to. It all can change how fast a person can pick something up.

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I'm above 70 hours right now and I'm not close to getting my license. I have soloed around the pattern but I haven't soloed longer. Is this normal? I feel like I'm taking too long to get a license.

 

So the question is why haven't you done a 1.5 hour flight to a nice airport 75 or 100 miles away? Do you feel comfy jumping in and doing that flight tomorrow? If not, why not?

 

And "normal" for getting a private varies. All my pilot buddies and I got our private somewhere between 50 and 75 hours. If you're still in the pattern at 70 hours, you are most likely behind the curve.

Edited by Goldy
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I took 89 hours for my private. Every rating after went like clockwork. My biggest hold up was not my instructor, it was me in my own head fearing the outcome. Trying to believe in yourself and relax is hard for some guys, but in the end we all come to that point where we can.

 

So with that said... Get ur dun and stop messin round!!

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I'm above 70 hours right now and I'm not close to getting my license. I have soloed around the pattern but I haven't soloed longer. Is this normal? I feel like I'm taking too long to get a license.

 

As a comparison, on average, you should already be a private pilot…… While you do not provide enough information to determine where the problem actually lies, the one thing you should absolutely do is stop taking lessons. The next think you should do is; have a frank discussion with the owner of the flight school. He is the person who needs to explain why you are at, where you are at….. After that, if you have any additional concerns come back and ask away……

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Without knowing more about the particular situation, making any assessment at all would be pointless. Others have given good counsel.

 

If one isn't training regularly, then the number of hours one accrues becomes meaningless. If one is working from a busy controlled field, one may wind up with a lot more hours transitioning to a practice area or field. Multiple instructor changes, location changes, school changes, or any number of other factors might be at play, and there are always students which take a long time getting there (or don't get there at all.

 

The majority of those who begin flight training don't finish it. The majority of those who go on to obtain a private pilot certificate end up flying very little, or not at all.

 

The national average for a private pilot is about 70 hours (don't know the specific number off hand). It's not that unusual to have that number of hours, but again, the hours won't have much significance if the training isn't on a regular, frequent basis. It is unusual to go that long before solo. More details are needed, including frequency of training, duration and type of training, aircraft involved, personal situation, etc. How many instructors? How many schools? How long since you began training? How often do you train? How long are the lessons. How old are you and what's your background? How old and how experienced is your instructor? What type of aircraft? What type of school or facility? Do you have a current medical? Current student pilot certificate? Have you passed your knowledge exam? Are you following a syllabus in your training? What's the delay and hold-up in your training or progress that's not letting you solo?

 

Devil's in the details. Get evil.

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