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Attention: Old pilots, current pilots and ESPECIALLY new pilots. Something you might want to know about...

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You know come to think of it, flight instructors do a lot of photo flights, so,...

 

If no one can afford to become a pilot anymore because it requires 200 hours for private and 500 for commercial, then that means there will be no more students,...and no students means no more instructors, which means eventually,...

 

I will be the only pilot left with enough hours to do all those photo flights!

 

,...maybe I'll start my own photo flight business?

:)

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Hey Prez, you said you were gonna talk to the lawyers yesterday about your class action.

 

Did they laugh you out of the building? Or just laugh at your hair?

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Suspicions confirmed.

 

 

 

Sure, Afg is where you work as an A&P to make great money, but as I previously said, my bi-weekly pay checks were bigger when I was stateside, working on logging jobs and fires. I just get more time off at once here in Afg. 28/28 rotation instead of the 14/7 I was working stateside.

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I did contact a law firm to initiate a class action lawsuit. I have a telephonic meeting with them next week and theyre well aware of the problem. So anyone who was doubting can take their foot out of their mouth

Lawyers will take any case. You'll still lose. (Note the use of the apostrophe... you might want to start using one when trying to impress potential employers.)

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Nothing new here- check out this historical perspective on Just Helicopters- "Why you don't make any money". The link is to a 2009 posting, but I have a printout of the same article that was posted 3/31/2005.

 

http://www.justhelicopters.com/ArticlesNews/CommunityArticles/tabid/433/Article/67673/Why-you-don-t-make-any-money-.aspx

 

edit: the link may not be working (operator error, probably) but try this: http://www.justhelicopters.com/ArticlesNews/CommunityArticles/tabid/433/Article/67673/Why-you-don-t-make-any-money-.aspx

Edited by helicodger pilot
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As if this was news. I've been flying nearly 40 years and this has pretty much always been the norm. In fact, pay is better now than its ever been in the industry. When I got out of full time flying as a career, because the pay was too low, back in 1992, regional carriers were paying about $12K a year to new co-pilots. I've been a paramedic for 10 years. 2 years of school, same as a nurse, to earn about 2/3 of the income at best. Fortunately, that's not how I make my money, its just for fun, like flying always was. I would still be flying for a living if I could have made the money I can make today flying. Its also far more stable due to the higher demand.

 

Its always about supply and demand. Simple economics. If you think the operators can do better, by all means join the side of the business and pay the high wages you think are doable. I hope you have a deep checkbook to start.

 

As a good friend has said, if it was that easy, everybody would do it.

 

Charlie

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Im regretting it too. Its the worst choice Ive ever made for a long term career. I dont take back the experience and the beautiful places Ive flown. I just despise how pilots are treated. At least Maverick pays their pilots what they deserve when the work you to the bone. Thats the only company I know of other than some select off shore jobs or oversees contracts. But who wants to fly between RPGs and bullets wizzing by you? Anyone down to file a class action lawsuit against the FAA for allowing people to fly a helicopter at 40 hours? Its so unbelievably DANGEROUS, even passing their bs excuse for a checkride. If a 40 hour pilot that just passed his checkride had an actual engine failure, that would be the end of him and we all know it. So why not stand up and make a change !

 

 

I had an engine failure at 50 or so hours while working on my commercial. Turned crosswind and everything went quiet, did the "impossible turn" and put it back on the runway.

 

I had my second engine failure at around 400 hours giving tourists a ride.

 

both cases no damage to helicopter or injury to occupants.

 

your premise is completely flawed or you are completely incompetent or both.

Edited by Jaybee
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I had an engine failure at 50 or so hours while working on my commercial. Turned crosswind and everything went quiet, did the "impossible turn" and put it back on the runway.

 

I had my second engine failure at around 400 hours giving tourists a ride.

 

both cases no damage to helicopter or injury to occupants.

 

your premise is completely flawed or you are completely incompetent or both.

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I had an engine failure at 50 or so hours while working on my commercial. Turned crosswind and everything went quiet, did the "impossible turn" and put it back on the runway.

 

 

 

I had my second engine failure at around 400 hours giving tourists a ride.

 

both cases no damage to helicopter or injury to occupants.

 

your premise is completely flawed or you are completely incompetent or both.

Now Jaybee.. we are all happy that you are bonafide Robbie-Ranger. No need for name calling. Would you mind sharing the FAA reports with us? Dont give an excuse as to why you dont share. Id be willing to bet $1,000.00 cash that youre fabricating both stories. Robinsons rarely have engine failures and I HIGHLY doubt that you had two of them within 400 hours. I would also like to add that in the miracle you described, you would be one of the few that could pull off a full down at 40 hours. Statistics are on my side, so swallow your words for me.

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How do you know they were in a Robbie?

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What else would they be flying at 40 hours? What else would they be giving a tour in at 400 hours? First instance, R22 or schweizer. Second instance r44. No insurance company would cover a noob with 40 or 400 hours in a turbine. I mean Im sure they would but it would be crazy expensive. Jaybee is full of it. Notice he didnt respond

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Now Jaybee.. we are all happy that you are bonafide Robbie-Ranger. No need for name calling. Would you mind sharing the FAA reports with us? Dont give an excuse as to why you dont share. Id be willing to bet $1,000.00 cash that youre fabricating both stories. Robinsons rarely have engine failures and I HIGHLY doubt that you had two of them within 400 hours. I would also like to add that in the miracle you described, you would be one of the few that could pull off a full down at 40 hours. Statistics are on my side, so swallow your words for me.

Are you even a pilot ? Neither one required a report to the FAA per NTSB rules. Though the Rapid City FSDO did come visit me after they caught word, shook my hand and said good job son.

 

Both failures were in a Bell 47.

 

I did full downs with my instructor before I soloed.

 

On a good day I'm average at best. Your assertion that someone would need to be a super stick is incorrect.

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Are you even a pilot ? Neither one required a report to the FAA per NTSB rules. Though the Rapid City FSDO did come visit me after they caught word, shook my hand and said good job son.

 

Both failures were in a Bell 47.

 

I did full downs with my instructor before I soloed.

 

On a good day I'm average at best. Your assertion that someone would need to be a super stick is incorrect.

My apologies, youre right.

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I'm a super stick!

 

,...and a swell guy too. :D

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Now Jaybee.. we are all happy that you are bonafide Robbie-Ranger. No need for name calling. Would you mind sharing the FAA reports with us? Dont give an excuse as to why you dont share. Id be willing to bet $1,000.00 cash that youre fabricating both stories. Robinsons rarely have engine failures and I HIGHLY doubt that you had two of them within 400 hours. I would also like to add that in the miracle you described, you would be one of the few that could pull off a full down at 40 hours. Statistics are on my side, so swallow your words for me.

As a primary I & II instructor at Fort Wolters, I will tell you that a fair few solo students had successful forced landings in TH55s, TH13s, and OH23s. I won't pretend it was a 100% occurrence, but it is certainly not impossible.

 

If the school is willing to bend airframes in practice, and touchdown autos are practiced often enough, a solo student can do pretty well. The rule was at least one touch down auto as well as a 'power chop/forced landing' (allowed to go to the ground or more commonly, abort) every day.

 

The trick is training the student to ALWAYS HAVE A FORCED LANDING AREA in range and be mentally prepared to go. Yes, I know that isn't always possible. When that subject arises you teach survival decisions, not wishful thinking...

 

Anyhow, a 15, 20 hour solo can certainly do a 100% succesful engine out.

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Anyhow, a 15, 20 hour solo can certainly do a 100% succesful engine out.

 

 

This is absolutely correct. No student should be soloed who cannot put the aircraft back on the ground with loss of power or a mechanical malfunction.

 

The original poster, whom I have blocked and am not following, has pursued an idiotic line that if believed, can only point to his own incompetence. I have worked with numerous students, and thousands of low time pilots over the years in all stages of training and employ. The level of incompetence that the original poster ascribes to low time pilots would be an extreme outlier, and if this is the personal experience of the original poster, we immediately see the problem.

 

Any instructor that would let a student solo, or complete training through basic certification (eg, Private Pilot, etc), without the competence to make a forced landing is a very poor instructor, and a student who cannot meet that basic threshold has not received adequate preparation. This is not a function of 500 hours, and should be met at a fundamental level by the time the student solos.

 

I'm in training for another type rating at the moment, and there are individuals here who have recently upgraded to captain on large widebody types, flying international, in their early 20's. To suggest age prevents this, or low experience, is to profess appalling ignorance. How might the US Military insert inexperienced aviators into positions of demand and high responsibility in combat, were the original poster remotely in the ballpark? The truth is that the premise of the original poster is absurd, and calls his own competence and training into question. I've been flying and training and teaching for several decades, and seldom have heard such uninformed drivel.

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Is it even possible for Avbug to make a post *without* mentioning that he flies wide-bodies or 747's or whatever? But didn't he also tell us once that he'd lost his medical over some vague issue? Isn't he just a mechanic now who tells a lot of, "when I was a pilot..." stories? His pontificating gets as old as mine does...but at least mine are funny (to me).

Edited by Nearly Retired

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But he made no mention of any aircraft type in the above post?

So from your post, we’ll have to surmise (in Yoda voice) “the insecurity is strong in this one”.

Give us something to work with; you could have said you don’t fly wide body aircraft due to the pilot seat design not accommodating your large penis/bollocks.

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Damn, we haven't had a thread go this long in quite a while!

 

Just out of curiosity, anyone ever fly a helicopter where the gauges were lit up with red lights?

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Damn, we haven't had a thread go this long in quite a while!

 

Just out of curiosity, anyone ever fly a helicopter where the gauges were lit up with red lights?

 

Threads seem to get a few extra pages when sh!t starts to get flung....as per usual.

 

Flew a 300C with all the back lights burned out and bunch of red lights pointed at the gauges, does that count?

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Damn, we haven't had a thread go this long in quite a while!

 

Just out of curiosity, anyone ever fly a helicopter where the gauges were lit up with red lights?

The H-3 Sea Kings I flew in the Navy were non-NVG, and had red gauges.

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Did you fly around thinking, this sucks,...who picked this color,...I can't distinguish between the red, yellow and green markings!?

 

,...or was it just me? :o

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