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Nearly Retired

She's Baaaaaack!

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It's too bad it gets completely lost in the woman-hating. Compare your first post in this thread to your posts about the Augusta crashing in NYC or the Hudson River LTE incident, for example. How many times do you reference the gender of the pilot? In the Augusta thread there may be one but then everywhere else it's "the pilot". In the LTE thread there are a few in an early paragraph and then it's "the 206 pilot". In your first post in this thread you reference the pilot's gender 13 times in the first paragraph alone and then continue to refer to the pilot as "this woman".

 

Why do you think you write differently about a female pilot than you do about a male pilot? The difference is objectively visible.

 

Because the woman pilot wears too much denim, doesn't use checklists and flies too low over populated areas.

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Because the woman pilot wears too much denim, doesn't use checklists and flies too low over populated areas.

I guess I need you to read between the lines for me because I'm still not seeing how the gender is relevant to anyone without a bias. Can you explain it like I'm 5?

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Men complain about women. Women complain about men. Its the natural order when you have two sexes! Get over it Nancy!

 

,...HA! See what I did there.

 

You PC types are gonna have one hell of a rebellion when your kids grow up,...well maybe grandkids the generations aren't as quick as they used to be.

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AkAr,

 

I've complained about Bob's attitude towards women on here before (and I'm a man) and you're not going to change his world view or how he communicates it. He comes from a different generation that says if you're so weak that a anonymous person's statement on the internet about your gender could discourage you than we don't need you in the air (or insert other male dominated profession. And honestly I kinda agree with that sentiment. However I also have female friends who I respect and care about and I've watched sexism and sexual harassment discourage them in aviation. So maybe some comment on the internet is the straw that breaks the camel's back and make someone quit after getting laughed out of the fbo by some dipshit saying she's not a real pilot.

 

Bob is a real life friend of mine and he is a good person, but I can disagree with him on his sexism. I've personally watched him mentor a young female pilot though and he's a different person in the real world. He lacks some perspective though while having some that we lack.

 

I would suggest voicing you disagreement, learning from his valid points, and not letting his trolling get you wrapped up.

 

Or not. You do you.

-Fred

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Goddammit, Fred, shut up!

 

I hate it when people on here make more sense than I do ;-)

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So...where's Bob coming from with all this woman-hating stuff? I mean, he must really hate women, that biased hater of women!

 

For the record, I do not hate women. Jeebus! However, if I'm biased (and I don't think there's any doubt about it) I don't apologize for that. You don't like it? Tough. Go cry to someone who cares. Like one of your many cats. Or your wussified boyfriend with his beard and man-bun, AAAAAHAHAHAHA.

 

I guess I need you to read between the lines for me because I'm still not seeing how the gender is relevant to anyone without a bias. Can you explain it like I'm 5?

 

Oh, you mean the way we have to explain most things to you? Well, okaaaaayyyyy...if you insist.

 

Sweetheart, the sad (for you) fact is that most helicopter pilots are men. Why? Durrrr….maybe because women are not attracted to this crazy industry? It's not like "the industry" deliberately tries to keep them out. Every year I do the hiring of pilots for the company at which I work. Every year my boss eagerly asks me if we've gotten any resumes from female pilots. He's nearly 80 but he's a complete horndog...err, I should rephrase that - "he likes having women around." (What normal man doesn't?) In my experience, Chief Pilots always look for and prefer to hire women. My boss says, "I'd have an all-female pilot staff if it were possible." But having an erection for that long might just kill him. He might say, "What a way to go!"

 

The problem is that this...well...eagerness to hire and promote women sometimes backfires on men. It's a sort of reverse-discrimination type of thing. Women are often selected for promotions before a similarly-qualified male pilot. Oh, you want proof, do you? I thought you might!

 

Picture it - the current issue of FLYING Magazine. In his monthly column, Contributing Editor Sam Weigel profiles a female pilot he's known for over 20 years. Originally she wanted to be a doctor, and for a time went to Baylor College of Medicine. But before actually receiving her degree, she quit and wandered aimlessly for a bit. Eventually she joined the U.S. Army and got to fly Chinooks, in which she did two deployments to Afghanistan.

 

Prior to this woman's second deployment, she applied for the U.S. Army's Experimental Test Pilot School. Surprise, surprise, she was accepted! Even Sam Weigel seemed astonished. He wrote that it was, "...a pretty huge deal for a Chief Warrant Officer of her age and experience, not to mention her lack of an engineering degree." Ahhhh, yeah. You would think...I mean, you would THINK that an engineering degree would be the minimum prerequisite to acceptance into Experimental Test Pilot School.

 

So this chick - this basic Warrant with no special qualifications (other than having boobs) - got to go to Experimental Test Pilot School. Are we to believe that there were *NO* male pilots who were more qualified and experienced (and more deserving) than she? Of course there were - there *had* to be. But the Army wanted a female Experimental Test Pilot, and so one was chosen.

 

This right here is why women sometimes see prejudice, bias and animosity from their male counterparts. Females in aviation get special considerations and privileges that men don't - all in the name of "equality" and "fairness," you understand. And it pisses men off.

 

Women pilots are not special, nor are they "better" or "safer" than male pilots. Oh, women like to trot out statistics that they crash less, or they score higher on tests or some hogwash. None of that means anything because women are statistically such a tiny percentage of the pilot population. When samples are that small, statistics are meaningless.

 

In my 45 total years in aviation, starting as a lineboy and then flying commercially since 1982, I've met a sh*t-ton of pilots. The fact is that while I have known some awesome, outstanding female pilots, a lot of them are just average or slightly below. You know, like male pilots.

 

I once had a female pilot break down and start crying - literally sobbing - in the cockpit during a morning training session that was not going so well. While it is true that she was not comfortable nor happy flying with me (imagine that!), her skills were in reality not up to where she claimed they were on her resume and in her pre-employment phone interview.

 

The reason she was crying, she told me, was that her grandfather had passed away. I assumed that it had happened the day before, and suggested that if she needed to go home and be with her parents, we would understand. No, she said, her grandfather had passed away a few days ago, and she was just still processing the event. I sat there, staring out into space and just, kind of, you know, blinking in disbelief.

 

Look, old people die - that's the natural order of things. It cannot be a surprise when a grandparent passes away. Furthermore, any pilot that cannot compartmentalize emotional crap and put it aside when he climbs into the aircraft has no business being in an aircraft. When we landed, I told my boss to send her down the road...that she was emotionally unstable. I was overruled.

 

First year that I was drying cherries, July 25, 2011, one of our young pilots caught a wire, crashed and burned up. I had just landed for fuel and was shutting down when the FAA called and very bluntly broke the news that Stephen had died in a crash. I must've been visibly shaken as I got out of the helicopter, because my farm manager came over and immediately asked, "What's wrong?" So I told him.

 

Unlike the FAA prick, he gently said that he'd understand if I needed to stand down. "No," I said, "I need to go flying." And it's not because I'm some unfeeling robot or automaton with no emotions. It's just that "down here" we're not in control of anything. "Up there," at least I'm in control of...something...even if it's only the aircraft. I can focus on that and shut out the outside world. I put Stephen's death aside and went back up and did my job. If I got emotional at all (and I'm not saying that I did), it didn't happen until later, after the flying was done.

 

I've never had a male pilot cry in the cockpit...although...I have come close to reducing a few to tears. Apparently I'm not the easiest guy in the world to share a cockpit with (tell 'em, butters!). I know this. I do not care about this. But zero percent of the guys I've ever flown with have cried. And if I've known, say, ten female commercial pilots in my career, then one, or 10% of them have broken into tears. (Still think statistics matter?)

 

So. Where does this leave us with respect to referring as a woman the subject of my original post? Does that "prove" that I have gender issues or that I'm a woman-hater? Feh. It's like this: When you don't want to mention someone by name, you have to substitute a pronoun. This is basic English. In the context of the first paragraph of my first post in this thread, it would have been silly - not to mention incorrect - to say "him" instead of "her" or "he" instead of "she."

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The first video posted in this thread was dated 2016. I believe this Ntsb report refers to the same pilot and subsequent crash in 2018.

 

Keep that in mind while viewing the first video and the original comments by NR.

 

Bad habits do have consequences.

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Is this one of the major risks/set-backs for single operator 135 outfits? Or part 91 I guess too....Theres no one to catch your bad habits developing. Theres no second set of eyes help ensure standardization. Perhaps a YouTube video and the follow on comments will help fill that void in some odd way???

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Bad habits do have consequences.

For both male and female pilots, right? So why is it important to focus on the gender when it's a female pilot that screws up but focus on the actions when it's a male pilot?

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So. Where does this leave us with respect to referring as a woman the subject of my original post? Does that "prove" that I have gender issues or that I'm a woman-hater? Feh. It's like this: When you don't want to mention someone by name, you have to substitute a pronoun. This is basic English. In the context of the first paragraph of my first post in this thread, it would have been silly - not to mention incorrect - to say "him" instead of "her" or "he" instead of "she."

So why do you primarily use a gendered pronoun when discussing female pilots but primarily use "the pilot" when discussing make pilots?

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For both male and female pilots, right? So why is it important to focus on the gender when it's a female pilot that screws up but focus on the actions when it's a male pilot?

Nothing in my words indicate nor suggest gender. Yes, you are right bad habits can occur in all people.

 

It is too bad our politically correct culture has so much infiltrated our perception or filter of reality. Often gender has no bearing to the actions or is part of an issue, but becomes the major focus of a story. Our left leaning politicians and our press seem to be particularity guilty of this.

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For both male and female pilots, right? So why is it important to focus on the gender when it's a female pilot that screws up but focus on the actions when it's a male pilot?

You seem to like frivolous crusades, so perhaps you can shed some light on this for me?

 

What happened to the word "sex"?

 

Unisex bathrooms are now "gender neutral" bathrooms, transexuals are now "transgenders", and on forms and applications where it used to ask for my sex, it now asks for "gender"!

 

Did the word "sex" offend you people, and if so, how,...?

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Hobie, with all due respect, I believe AlluhAkbar was referring to me. I've consistently referred to the subject of this thread as "she" and "her," something AkAr finds extremely troubling. But AkAr can go piss up a rope, if that's even possible for her.

 

Moving on...

 

Is this one of the major risks/set-backs for single operator 135 outfits? Or part 91 I guess too....Theres no one to catch your bad habits developing. Theres no second set of eyes help ensure standardization. Perhaps a YouTube video and the follow on comments will help fill that void in some odd way???

 

Ah, but even when there *is* someone to catch your bad habits, bad things can still happen!

 

Take the crash of a Grumman Gulfstream IV on takeoff in Boston back in 2014. It was a corporate G-IV, and the two jokers flying it were not kids (age 45 and 61) and they were VERY experienced and very highly regarded among their peers. They'd both been with the company for over ten years. One of them was the Part 91 flight department's Chief Pilot. They'd both flown with each other dozens if not hundreds of times. So there's two guys who you'd never suspect of making a dumb mistake, eh?

 

But they did!

 

They had made a short flight from Atlantic City, NJ to Boston's Hanscom Field. They arrived in daylight and knew they were going to be there for a couple of hours. One of them set the control lock (gust lock).

 

Their principal and his party returned after dark, a little after 9 pm. The pilots were probably asleep in recliners in the FBO, snoring away like pilots do in between flights. Wakened from a presumably deep slumber, they hopped in and, with the practiced ease of you getting in your PT Cruiser for a trip to Walmarts for your weekend "hope-I-get-lucky-at-the-bar-tonight" supplies (Cheetos, a case of Keystone Light and a box of Trojan condoms, extra-small), they fired that big jet up and taxied out for takeoff. Headed home, less than a 45-minute flight. Easy-peasy. Milk run.

 

During the pre-takeoff checks, Neither pilot did one of those, "Controls - Free and correct" checks in which you move all of the controls to their limits - like when we helicopters "wipe the cockpit out" with the cyclic and collective and pedals. The G-IV pilots didn't do it on this flight, and evidently they were in the habit of not doing it at all, it turned out. An audit showed that in the past 150+ flights they had only used the checklist twice. Twice. Because they had it memorized, right? And on May 31, 2014, in the dark cockpit of the G-IV, neither one of them noticed that they'e forgotten to release the gust lock. The handle was not lighted nor noticeable.

 

The Gulfstream IV is supposed to have a pin that prevents dumb pilots from advancing the throttles if the controls are locked. For some reason, this feature on this particular G-IV did not work as designed. The pilots were able to advance the throttles - sort of. They pushed them up a bit and then engaged the autothrottles to handle it from there. The PF noted that he couldn't push the throttles up very far, but did not associate that with the gust locks being on. Hey, come on, he only had 8,000+ hours! But even the autothrottles couldn't get the power up to the usual takeoff setting. But the jet was light and probably didn't need full power to takeoff that night.

 

Anyway, the G-IV accelerated down the runway. Almost immediately the PF started complaining that the controls are locked. He didn't abort as he shoudl have, mind you, he just complained. It takes a few moments for them to realize that the controls can't move because the dang ol' control lock is still on! The only approved way to get the lock off once the engines are running is to shut down the engines and de-power the hydraulics. But there's an unapproved workaround! By momentarily hitting the hydraulic shut-down switch (called the FPSOV), you could get the lock off. But! That wouldn't work - the gust locks won't release if there are aerodynamic loads on the control surfaces, which by now there were. Ooopsie!

 

By the crew finally decided to abort it was waaaaaaaay too late. The G-IV ran off the end of the runway and crashed, killing everyone - all seven people - on board.

 

So you've got your checklists memorized, eh? You would never make a dumb mistake like that...like two pilots with 8,000+ and a 14,000+ hours, eh? We don't need no steengkeeeng checklists!

 

Me, I don't know what the answer is when it comes to combating complacency. You fly alone, you get complacent. You fly with another pilot (the same pilot) for over ten years, you both get complacent. Obviously, the subject of this thread - the person who by order of AkAr must not be referred to as a male or female - has become pretty complacent. Her...damn, I mean this pilot's airmanship is horrible. Wait, can I even say "airMANship?" Isn't that sexist? I wish I was more PC. I hate offending people...of any gender!

 

Kathryn's Report of the G-IV Accident

 

Philadelphia Inquirer Article About G-IV Accident

 

YouTube Recreation Done By NTSB

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I wouldn't say I'm troubled, amused is closer to the truth. It's amusing seeing how affected you are by another person's body parts. I'm used to keyboard warriors typing things they'd never say to me in person, so that's also amusing to me. Watching you fade farther into irrelevancy gives me lots of pleasure! 😂

 

Butters, there's a subtle difference between sex and gender, but to me the context clears up any confusion. If somebody says sex when they mean gender I can figure it out just fine, doesn't bother me.

Edited by AkAr

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How do you delete something... oops 2!

 

Just mention the name of the subject of this thread - it'll get deleted for you! ;-)

 

 

AkAr: What's funny is you implying that *you* have any relevancy...or any more than I do. Hey, here's a thought: Why not change your profile so that it reflects your true sex...I mean, gender? It's clear to everyone here that you're a woman. Oh, and trust me, missy, everything I say here I'd say to your face. Ask any of the guys on here who know me personally.

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AkAr: What's funny is you implying that *you* have any relevancy...or any more than I do.

Not surprising that you'd confuse implying with inferring. I didn't imply anything. You'll be gone soon and the helicopter world will be a better place for it. Edited by AkAr

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Not surprising that you'd confuse implying with inferring. I didn't imply anything. You'll be gone soon and the helicopter world will be a better place for it.

 

If you are actually in the helicopter industry, you come across as someone who does not take advice or criticism kindly from those that have more experience and understanding of aviation than you.

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You'll be gone soon and the helicopter world will be a better place for it.

Oh come now, if Bob leaves they'll be no one left to dry cherries but 500 hour Robbie Rangers, and well,..."her"!

 

Yeah that's right, I don't know how you did Bob, but the 58 guy said I was the highest time guy of all the new hires by like 200 hours!,...woo that's sad!

 

I don't want to say there's a pilot shortage, but,...

 

,...maybe there is a pilot shortage :o

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If you are actually in the helicopter industry, you come across as someone who does not take advice or criticism kindly from those that have more experience and understanding of aviation than you.

 

Somebody out there still thinks this is about aviation? Wow.

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Somebody out there still thinks this is about aviation? Wow.

 

I guess I am always the optimist... heheh... So, what is this about... a fruit? (re: cherries)?

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Not surprising that you'd confuse implying with inferring. I didn't imply anything. You'll be gone soon and the helicopter world will be a better place for it.

 

Missy, I can assure you- I know the difference between implying and inferring. I choose my words very carefully. Unlike you.

 

Saying that the helicopter world will be a better place after I'm gone is, I think, being awfully and unnecessarily nasty and cruel. Bitter, too. I've never said anything that personally bad about you (although I may have thought it...okay, I have thought it). Seems to me you have some serious man-hating issues to deal with. Why do you hate men so much? Do you wear a lot of plaid? Did your dad not give you enough attention when you were growing up?

 

Look, I've spent a long time in this industry, sweetie. I've done a good job for all of the people I've worked for. I've mentored and counseled and encouraged more pilots than all of the guys you'll ever meet on Tinder. Or Grinder, whichever is your choice app for meeting men. I've given over 100 Young Eagle rides. Not 100 kids...100+ rides in my two-seat airplane(s). I write stupid articles on stupid websites like this for no money, just so maybe...maybe it causes another pilot to laugh and think a little bit about how he goes about manipulating and conveying these crazy contraptions through the air.

 

And what have you done?

 

I've seen the future of helicopter aviation, the new crop that's going to take my place. And you know what? I'm generally not impressed. I'm not impresed with guys who crash perfectly good LongRangers into the Hudson River because some paranoid R-44 instructor convinced them that 206's are just a hair-breadth away from getting into uncontrollable LTE. I'm not impressed with 206 pilots that can't even land a goddamn B-model on a dolly without rolling it over. And I'm especially not impressed with ol' whatserface, Mrs. doesn't-use-a-checklist, doesn't-do-a-pretakeoff-check, doesn't-do-a-hover-check, flies-low-over-people's-houses, and crashes-her-helicopter-into-trees-at-night-while-diddling-her-iPad.

 

Oh yeah, this is some industry that'll be better when *I* leave!

 

You can have it. See if you can make a difference, hon. Maybe you can be...you know...relevant.

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