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guidance needed


jubella99
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sirs,

I am a junior military pilot flying the UH1H. i have decided to pursue my career outside the service but scanning the employment threads, i noticed (and expected) that my aircraft basically has no points when getting a job. i dont think i can afford to get a rating from the other aircrafts required but i do want to pursue a career as a civilian heli pilot. location is no problem as i can re locate anywhere where i can land my skids.  Can i ask for your guidance on how to make my first step? many thanks sirs and more power.

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  • 3 weeks later...
<font color='#000000'>sirs,

I am a junior military pilot flying the UH1H. i have decided to pursue my career outside the service but scanning the employment threads, i noticed (and expected) that my aircraft basically has no points when getting a job. i dont think i can afford to get a rating from the other aircrafts required but i do want to pursue a career as a civilian heli pilot. location is no problem as i can re locate anywhere where i can land my skids. Can i ask for your guidance on how to make my first step? many thanks sirs and more power.</font>

 

Don't worry about aircraft ratings. The UH1 is fine, since it's a turbine. People with only R22 time are getting hired, and if you have UH1 time you'll be far ahead of them. Get all the flight time you can, because that's what is important, not aircraft ratings.

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I first flew the UH-1 in Viet Nam circa 1969-70, and after 37 years, am still flying the Huey on a government contract. With 9,000 hours in helicopters, 15 types of helicopters flown (including twin-helo), and in almost every type of job (off-shore, TV News, helicopter airline, sling-load, medevac, photo) , there are still many jobs out there I do not qualify for. Reasons can be as varied as I am too heavy (weight wise), I have not attended a specific school (type rating), or they require special abilities (foreign language, etc.).

 

My advice is to find an entry level type of position which will get your feet wet in the industry, and start you on your way to establishing a network of contacts. Additionally, there is truth in the fact, that if you have flown aircraft that are more complex (turbine, multi-eng., IFR), then you will be more acceptable to a potential employer, than say a new entry pilot with only R-22 or equivilent type of experience.

 

Experience is the key factor, and the more varied and complex the flight history you have, the better your resume will be recieved.

 

By the way, do not make the mistake of bouncing around so much, that the employer will deduce you can not stay in one job for more than a few months. They simply cannot afford to retrain a new pilot every 4 or 5 months. Make yourself valuable to the employer through your dedication, and high levels of work ethics.

 

Good Luck,

 

Gryphon4

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