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Question about the helicopter you train on....


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For someone who is just starting out in the Rotorcraft field, and wanting to make this their new career, is training on the Robinson's R22 and R44 going to get you jobs flying other helicopters? In other words, am I limited in my job opportunities once I have my commercial license with Turbine Transition training and other common training that is given with the training on the R22 or R44? If not, what do you do to get this training? You already have your commercial license, so do you just hire an instructor and rent other types of helicopters? Hope this isn't too vague a question. :blink: Thanks for your help!

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For someone who is just starting out in the Rotorcraft field, and wanting to make this their new career, is training on the Robinson's R22 and R44 going to get you jobs flying other helicopters? In other words, am I limited in my job opportunities once I have my commercial license with Turbine Transition training and other common training that is given with the training on the R22 or R44? If not, what do you do to get this training? You already have your commercial license, so do you just hire an instructor and rent other types of helicopters? Hope this isn't too vague a question. :blink: Thanks for your help!

 

 

Ok - the R22 is really an entry level trainer. To answer your question as simply as possible: yes it will get you a job flying bigger stuff. Once you can fly one type, you really can fly anything.

 

The typical way that people build time in helicopters is to teach. Once you get to about 1000 hours then you will be marketable as a commercial pilot. Typically you will end up in the Gulf of Mexico or flying tours somewhere. The employing company will pay for your training, so don't worry about.

 

One thing is your post though, and I want you to take notice of this: Do not pay for a turbine transition course out of your own pocket. When you get sufficient time an employer will pay for this. If you have the money to burn, a Jet ranger goes now for around $750 an hour, then buy R22 time to build your total time.

 

If you have not started your training yet, or made a decision on where to go then spend a lot of time researching schools and training fees. Remember it's a serious investment you are making..................

 

Good luck,

JD

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Thank you for the helpful information, JD. I am so glad I came accross this website before I dove into training with a certain flight school that I'm sure you can guess. I have always been one to do my research before getting myself into something, and I find this site absolutely awesome! You all have great insight and are very helpful to anyone who comes here. Thank you very much.

 

On another note, I am planning on attending an Aviation Fair in my area this Saturday and will be taking my time going to all the Helicopter booths, especially the ones that offer training. I have done alot of research already, but as you can tell, I still need help. I did get a chance to go up in a helicopter for the first time for a courtesy flight. All I can say is I'm stoked! I do have reservations to a small degree, but it's mostly because I haven't had but 10 minutes in a Helo. I am in later part of my 30's and have found going from job to job in the construction field just isn't my style. So, here I am getting myself into a new career. And from what I have seen so far, it's very exciting. Thanks again for you post, and I look forward to being a helpful part of these forums as soon as I can. Cheers!

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Thank you for the helpful information, JD. I am so glad I came accross this website before I dove into training with a certain flight school that I'm sure you can guess. I have always been one to do my research before getting myself into something, and I find this site absolutely awesome! You all have great insight and are very helpful to anyone who comes here. Thank you very much.

 

On another note, I am planning on attending an Aviation Fair in my area this Saturday and will be taking my time going to all the Helicopter booths, especially the ones that offer training. I have done alot of research already, but as you can tell, I still need help. I did get a chance to go up in a helicopter for the first time for a courtesy flight. All I can say is I'm stoked! I do have reservations to a small degree, but it's mostly because I haven't had but 10 minutes in a Helo. I am in later part of my 30's and have found going from job to job in the construction field just isn't my style. So, here I am getting myself into a new career. And from what I have seen so far, it's very exciting. Thanks again for you post, and I look forward to being a helpful part of these forums as soon as I can. Cheers!

 

I say go for it. At 39 I closed the doors on my business, sold my customer list to a competitor/friend and decided to become a helicopter pilot. Not the best timing, but it's a choice I have yet to regret. Should have my commercial ticket this Sunday (Checkride time again) and am aiming for my CFI by Easter and if I get real motivated, my CFII a few weeks after that.

 

Yes, I'll be making far less than I did as a contractor/biz owner, but it'll be doing something I love to do and if I have to live on Cup O' Noodles and hot dogs for a while, so be it. It's never too late to start over and I'm a prime example of it.

 

I say grab hold with both hands and don't let go!

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  • 2 weeks later...

Ace,

 

JD is right, do not put your money into a turbine transition. Being a low time helicopter pilot, turbine time is not much more than a waste of money. Employers and their insurance companies first look at your total time. You could pay for and have 500 hours of all turbine time, but it won't do you any good if their minimum is 1000 hours total time. Most employers that are going to give you that first turbine job are also going to train you in their equipment to fly it to their specifications. Flying a JetRanger is more glamorous than flying an R22, but put your money into getting the most number of hours that you can.

 

Doug

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