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I need some advice on which school to pick. I'm willing to re-locate if I have to, but it would be extremely nice if there was any decent schools here in Indiana. My main concern would be safety and quality instructors. Also, if they have some sort of Instructor Program, like they will hire you after you complete your training, that would be a plus. Really though, I would probably end up trying to find an Instructor job here in Indiana. I hope to get at least 1,000 hours before I go looking for a commerical job. Any advice is appreciated.

 

Thanks.

 

-Dave

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I need some advice on which school to pick. I'm willing to re-locate if I have to, but it would be extremely nice if there was any decent schools here in Indiana. My main concern would be safety and quality instructors. Also, if they have some sort of Instructor Program, like they will hire you after you complete your training, that would be a plus. Really though, I would probably end up trying to find an Instructor job here in Indiana. I hope to get at least 1,000 hours before I go looking for a commerical job. Any advice is appreciated.

 

Thanks.

 

-Dave

 

 

Where in IN? I know of a school by Gary & Hammond - but it is just over the border in IL.

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I'm willing to re-locate if I have to, but it would be extremely nice if there was any decent schools here in Indiana. Also, if they have some sort of Instructor Program, like they will hire you after you complete your training, that would be a plus. Really though, I would probably end up trying to find an Instructor job here in Indiana. I hope to get at least 1,000 hours before I go looking for a commerical job. Any advice is appreciated.

 

Here's some advice: do a lot more research on this occupation before you commit any money.

 

You're "willing to re-locate if [you] have to..."? You'd better count on relocating in this job. If you limit yourself to one location you are going to reduce the available jobs dramatically. And that will begin with your very first instructing job because no flight school...none, nada, zip...will guarantee at the start of your training that they will hire you "after you complete your training". That means you must risk the more than $60,000 of training cost (plus that much in interest if you finance it) with no assurance you will be able to find a job.

 

As for "I hope to get at least 1,000 hours before I go looking for a commerical job", it is more than just a "hope". It's a certainty. The period between the 200 hours you will have purchased to get to CFI and the 1,000 hours, at least, required by a commercial operator is your apprenticeship. You've got to have it to get hired, it's not an option. So before you commit to flight training that you will be paying for at about $800 a month for the next twenty years you'd be wise to give some thought to what you would be willing to do to get from 200 hours to 1,000 hours...i.e., relocate, live in a crappy part of a strange city, forego a social life, etc.

 

Do lots more research.

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"You'd better count on relocating in this job." I know that and I am looking forward to it. What I was trying to say was I would like to get training somewhere in my state. Going through training doesn't bring in any income and can take awhile. Being able to live with my parents will make it much eaiser on me and my wallet. After I get my CFI then I can get a job flying while making a bit of money to pay for a crappy arpartment and packs of ramen noodles.

 

"As for "I hope to get at least 1,000 hours before I go looking for a commerical job", it is more than just a "hope". It's a certainty." Not necessarily, I've seen jobs posted by employers that require only 300-500 hours. It's a common belief that 1000 hours is the "magic" number, I agree, a lot more jobs become available when you have more experience, but with a lot of persistence and luck, you can find a job with well under 1000 hours requirements. I don't like the idea of flying with so little experience.

 

As far as research goes, I feel I have read everything there is to read. I have heard all about the pro's and con's and still, when I wake up in the morning the only thing I can think of doing with the rest of my life and enjoying it is flying choppers. I have already came up with a plan that works for me to pay for my training. The only uncertainies left are the school and the job.

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I've seen jobs posted by employers that require only 300-500 hours. It's a common belief that 1000 hours is the "magic" number, I agree, a lot more jobs become available when you have more experience, but with a lot of persistence and luck, you can find a job with well under 1000 hours requirements.

 

As far as research goes, I feel I have read everything there is to read. I have heard all about the pro's and con's and still, when I wake up in the morning the only thing I can think of doing with the rest of my life and enjoying it is flying choppers. I have already came up with a plan that works for me to pay for my training. The only uncertainies left are the school and the job.

 

From the R&W 2005 salary survey:

 

http://www.defensedaily.com/include/catalo...yment_Guide.pdf

 

The average time required to be hired was 1,598 hours.

 

Company minimums & percent of respondents:

 

4,500 or more hours 2.0%

3,000 hours 14.0%

2,500 hours 3.5%

2,000 hours 23.0%

1,000 to 1,200 hours 35.6%

less than 1,000 19.0%

no minimum 6.0%

 

That 19% "less than 1,000" is pretty much all instructing.

 

The "job" part of that "only uncertainties" is a biggee. Just stay flexible, keep your options open and watch the costs carefully. What you are entering into is a major financial risk. Good luck.

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Thanks for the advice fry, you can be sure I am well aware of the financial risks involved. I don't easily spend money on anything. I think about what it is I want, then what it will cost me to obtain that. I weigh the costs with usefulness of whatever it is I want. Learning to fly is skill and to me skills are always valuable. I'm only eighteen, so I am faced with a choice. I could either invest anywhere from 12k-75k on college and get a degree in something that is safer and more stable, but more than likely dull and boring. Or I could invest 40-60K on a more specific skill set that is less safe and stable, but IMO more fun. I don't really care how much I make (thats a lie, yes I do.), but having a job that is challenging and fun at the same time is worth way more than an extra 30-50k a year. Since being a pilot usually means moving around a lot, that might mean less of a social life, but I plan on making many friends where ever I'm at. As long as I am having fun doing my job, I will go anywhere to do it.

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Sorry 67november, I kinda...skipped over your post somehow. :( I just now realized the link you posted, it saved me some time, 5 schools showed up in Indiana and I plan on checking them out. They don't seem to be popular schools that most people have heard of, but that doesn't mean they aren't any good. I'm hoping one is a pretty small school with a sort of old timer instructor. :D

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Just my opinion, but I've usually found the smaller schools to be a lot better than the larger ones. Also, try bring someone with you when you check out the schools. You'll be in shock and heaven looking and playing the helos and having a second/disinterested (ie your parents) set of eyes will cover anything possibly questionable you might miss. Also, take a demo ride the first chance you get and see if you even enjoy flying, which I'm sure you will.

 

One more thing... after that flight, if you decide you want to do this, go get a second class medical certificate from an FAA medical examiner. It's basically the level you need to fly for hire or compensation. If you know you can pass it now, then you won't have to worry about getting blindsided by an unknown health issue down the road when you get ready to solo. Just some quick advice for ya... good luck!!!

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One more thing... after that flight, if you decide you want to do this, go get a second class medical certificate from an FAA medical examiner. It's basically the level you need to fly for hire or compensation. If you know you can pass it now, then you won't have to worry about getting blindsided by an unknown health issue down the road when you get ready to solo. Just some quick advice for ya... good luck!!!

 

Yea, thats some great advice, I plan on doing that before I start my training, thanks ascott20!

 

 

 

 

"Try Northern Skies Aviaiton. www.northernskies.com. Close to Indiana, one on one flight instruction with flat and mountainous terrain. Best of both worlds. check it out.

 

Blue skies"

 

Lol, thats not close to Indiana at all, but thanks for the link.

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Sorry 67november, I kinda...skipped over your post somehow. :( I just now realized the link you posted, it saved me some time, 5 schools showed up in Indiana and I plan on checking them out. They don't seem to be popular schools that most people have heard of, but that doesn't mean they aren't any good. I'm hoping one is a pretty small school with a sort of old timer instructor. :D I've hung out with a lot of my dad's friends who are like that and they are just awesome people. Although there is this one named Ed, he's a real hard ass sometimes.

 

 

hey Dave, no problem

I also suggest you read the FAA books, I've been reading the Rotorcraft flying handbook pdf file right off of the FAA web site, finished chapter 12 today, there are many others there. I've printed several of them out (on company dollars ;) ) so i can make notes.

 

keep us posted on your progress, and good luck B)

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hey Dave, no problem

I also suggest you read the FAA books, I've been reading the Rotorcraft flying handbook pdf file right off of the FAA web site, finished chapter 12 today, there are many others there. I've printed several of them out (on company dollars ;) ) so i can make notes.

 

keep us posted on your progress, and good luck B)

hey Dave, no problem

I also suggest you read the FAA books, I've been reading the Rotorcraft flying handbook pdf file right off of the FAA web site, finished chapter 12 today, there are many others there. I've printed several of them out (on company dollars ;) ) so i can make notes.

 

keep us posted on your progress, and good luck B)

 

 

Cool I downloaded that book today, I'm learning a lot. So far I'm on Chapter 3. I didn't realize how much compensation you had to give in order to hover! Sounds like we are in the same boat, have you gotten in any hours yet on a aircraft? Whats your story so far?

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dont go to J.R. aviation.

 

Hey cornfed, do have any experience with J. R Aviation? If so, tell me about it. Also, are you from indiana also?

Thanks

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Indiana doesn't have a lot in the way of helicopter training, or operators for that matter. I am in North East Indiana, close to Ft. Wayne. There is an operator in Goshen with Enstroms. Indy is hit and miss, operator there one day, gone the next. JR Avaition in Clarksville, IN, but I don't know much about their operation. I did my Commercial training with a small operator in Napoleon Ohio, Classic Aviation. One man show with an R22, Enstrom and Jetranger, Good rates, Nice guy.

I would recommend that you get your Private rating somewhere as close to home as possible, even if it takes you a little longer, Then if you feel that its what you want to do, you can look into other schools. If it turns out that its not all you thought it would be, you won't be in so deep.

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I instructed for several years at a small flight school just a couple things to look at that can have a big effect on your training.

 

The more often you can fly the more proficent you stay. That means at the beginning of each flight your going to be "rusty". A person flying once a week is considerably more rusty than some one that fly's everyday. The more time you spend getting back up to speed the more money you spend. It adds up VERY fast.

 

That said

 

Are they going to be as available as you want? They may say yes but research into it. Other students etc.

 

Maintance - What kind of condition is the aircraft in? Old helo's with alot of time break more often.

Do they have on site maintance? If not the aircraft could be down for a long time. That and mechanics can fix the little things on the spot so you dont have to cancel your flight.

 

Older instructor aren't always the best. I've flown with older guys with thousands of hours that scared the crap out of me. That and the info is fresh and New in the youger guys. That can go both ways though. There are some new teaching tech. that help aid the learning process that some of the older guys may not be aware of.

 

 

 

It all comes down to having a good instructor. Find someone that you are comfortable around and you comunicate well with. Some one that feels like a good friend you can shoot the breeze with, yet maintains a very profesional attitude and demands your respect.

 

I went through 3 instructors before I finally found the one that matched my needs.

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I did my Commercial training with a small operator in Napoleon Ohio, Classic Aviation. One man show with an R22, Enstrom and Jetranger, Good rates, Nice guy.

I would recommend that you get your Private rating somewhere as close to home as possible, even if it takes you a little longer, Then if you feel that its what you want to do, you can look into other schools. If it turns out that its not all you thought it would be, you won't be in so deep.

 

Thanks for the recommendation, I'll be sure to look into him once I'm ready for training. I think I will do what you said and just pay for my PPL first, then if I like it like I think I will, I'll move ahead with commercials.

 

"

The more often you can fly the more proficent you stay. That means at the beginning of each flight your going to be "rusty". A person flying once a week is considerably more rusty than some one that fly's everyday. The more time you spend getting back up to speed the more money you spend. It adds up VERY fast. "

 

Yea, I am planning to my training in big blocks. Hopefully flying 5 or 6 days a week.

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