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I am considering getting into this field, however I read you need a 1000+ hours to get any kind of good job, but I also read that there are some less desirable flying jobs that you can get with your CPL and not many hours. I read this on the internet and wasnt sure if it was still acurate. There was flying to tuna boats and a few others, was wondering if anyone knew the others, and where these jobs are located if this information is still acurate.

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I am considering getting into this field, however I read you need a 1000+ hours to get any kind of good job, but I also read that there are some less desirable flying jobs that you can get with your CPL and not many hours. I read this on the internet and wasnt sure if it was still acurate. There was flying to tuna boats and a few others, was wondering if anyone knew the others, and where these jobs are located if this information is still acurate.

 

I'm not a pilot, but from what I've read those jobs still require around like 400-700 hours and they are usually overseas. Not saying there aren't probably any jobs for the minimum hours it takes for a CPL, but they are extremely rare because you're not insurable. Most people build their 1,000 hours instructing. The most common low-time flying jobs I've read about are photography and/or tours.

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your best bet is to build your time as an instructer. you learn ALOT about the aircraft and how the mind works and the human response. build your time and move on to other things if you like but all in all instructing isnt that bad of a job. its actually really satisfying giving someone the gift of flight. be wary of the low time adverts for job. flying tuna you are still going to need close to 1000 hours. you can get sic ( copilot ) positions in the gulf with 500 hours with an instrument rating. good luck.

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There are the super low-timer jobs out there, but you have to question why you would want them. Realize that the odds are good you will be getting used pretty badly. The operators know darned well that you are so desperate you will work for next to nothing, flying dodgy equipment in really poor environments. There are exceptions (maybe), but a 200-hour commercial pilot is the helicopter equivalent of an undocumented worker - you'll get the job because nobody else would take it.

 

Another upside to going the CFI/CFII route is that the CFII rating may mean a softening of hours requirements for a good job, say from 1250 to 1,000 for a VFR PIC position.

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I know of one person in the orlando FL area that just got a job flying helicopters for a real estate company with under 200 hours, and will be flying an R44, starting in the mid 30k range for pay. It can happen, but most people end up going the CFI route.

 

 

Do you know how this particular person found the job?

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well a good way to find a job, low or high time is knowing people.. network network network! always look professional and clean. you never know who you are talking to in or at an airport or who they know. wouldnt hurt to have some business cards too . i had some and i handed out a lot and only some called back for some work but hey, cards are cheap and i probably made a couple hundred bucks out of it. good luck!

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your best bet is to build your time as an instructer. you learn ALOT about the aircraft and how the mind works and the human response. build your time and move on to other things if you like but all in all instructing isnt that bad of a job. its actually really satisfying giving someone the gift of flight. be wary of the low time adverts for job. flying tuna you are still going to need close to 1000 hours. you can get sic ( copilot ) positions in the gulf with 500 hours with an instrument rating. good luck.

 

 

SIC with 500 +hrs, is that turbine ?

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xolo. no its not. i was contacted a while back in feb i believe from era helicopters in louisana. they were hiring sic with 500 hrs tt and instrument rating. however if you take the sic job from what i understand your going to be doing that for another 1000 roughly, rather than being a 1000 hour tt pic pilot.

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sounds like someone got real lucky. But I don't know if I would want to sit next to him.

 

On one hand I agree with you. I mean, 200 hours really is not that much if you're going to have the lives of other people in your hands.

 

On the other hand, think about flight instruction. A CFI has only 200 (or maybe 300) hours when starting to teach, plus being in the less stable R22. And to make it worse, think about the T-bar cyclic. When I fly (I'm a student), I have the cyclic resting on my leg. Since it's like a see-saw, the other side of the cyclic (for the CFI) is way up in the air in front of him. I haven't been in the CFI's position yet, but it sure looks awkward for him, and yet we rely on them to guide us through maneuvers and take over flying (if necessary).

 

In other words, it seems like flight instruction is more advanced than just passenger-transport.

 

Between the two, I think I would be more confident flying an R-44 with passengers (for transportation) than flying an R-22 with a student (for instruction).

 

(But yeah, considering how this business works, it does seem like he got lucky.)

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A CFI is allowed, heck, required to keep the flying in the safest possible realm. They won't be asked to land in parking lots, construction sites or other less-than-suitable areas. They won't have clients pressing them to fly in marginal weather, or to push fuel reserves, or to overload the aircraft. A flight school won't fire a CFI for erring on the side of caution.

 

It's generally a bad idea to put a 200-hour pilot in front of a bunch of folks with money who know very little about helicopters and aviation, but definitly know they want to get there, that's why they bought the helicopter!

 

This isn't a knock on the 200-hour pilot - heck, 200 hours is about like having your driver's license for six months, you shouldn't be expected to have baskets of experience. Nor should you think you are an expert. There's a reason the system works the way it does - to be honest, flight instruction is the safest, most sheltered flying a person will do in their career as a helicopter pilot. Only bad maintenance or sheer disreguard will put you in hazard as a CFI. Oh yeah, the R22...

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it would seem the logical route is ppl, instrument, commercial and then cfi. Where cfi would be the pinnacle of experience and aircraft knowledge. But agreed, even if by FAR/AIM definition you are eligible for cfi rating at 200+ in the R22, that doesnt mean a whole lot. I know of people knocking out CFIi in less than 13 months. There is no other way to get hours than teaching, well unless your rich enough to buy SIC time. Insurance companies are deeply rooted in any heli job, hence the 1500+ hrs requirement

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Fling,

 

You say that being a CFI is the "safest...flying a person will do in their career as a helicopter pilot". Am I wrong, but I seem to have a vague recollection of a stat I picked-up somewhere that most helicopter accidents/incidents occur in the flight training/flight instruction setting?

 

 

-V5

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Reading the accident stats it would appear that there are a large No are in training and a very large No of those are\were caused by autos to the ground.

The CFI I learnt with had 4000+ hours and I felt that he was always 1 step in front of me.

With a 200 hour CFI. I would have felt he only new a bit more than me and am shure would have been much quicker to take controle than a person with confidence in his own expertise, even if he was not, I would have been.

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Fling,

 

You say that being a CFI is the "safest...flying a person will do in their career as a helicopter pilot". Am I wrong, but I seem to have a vague recollection of a stat I picked-up somewhere that most helicopter accidents/incidents occur in the flight training/flight instruction setting?

-V5

Lots of bent metal, but very few people die, especially considering the number of flight hours. Compare that to just about any other helicopter vocation, and you'll see that from a physical safety standpoint, it's about as safe as you'll be in a helicopter. Now from a MENTAL safety standpoint... :P
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