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Oregon flight schools(no tax)


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Hi all,

 

Any opinions on the above listed helo flight schools..?? Experienced flight instructors..?? Training areas..??

 

For those of you looking for training schools the state of Oregon does not have sales tax which would offer a nice discount on the overall cost of training..!!

 

Any current or former students feel free to reply :)

 

THANKS.

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Guest rookie101
Hi all,

 

Any opinions on the above listed helo flight schools..?? Experienced flight instructors..?? Training areas..??

 

For those of you looking for training schools the state of Oregon does not have sales tax which would offer a nice discount on the overall cost of training..!!

 

Any current or former students feel free to reply :)

 

THANKS.

 

Here is a discussion of this. You can find more by using the search feature, just type in Hillsboro. I would go to Hillsboro, but it is 2 hours away from me (and that is going to there :blink:). When you do the search, further down the first page you can find a topic about Applebee (link not posted for that one).

http://helicopterforum.verticalreference.com/helicopterfor...09&hl=hillsboro

 

Good luck

 

btw- do you live in Oregon, and if you do, where?

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From what I understand, the Portland schools do have good training, otherwise they'd be out of business.

 

Seriously, go there, talk to them, see what they offer. If the criteria meet your needs, go for it. For more info, do like Aaron said and use the search feature.

 

Later

 

Hey Aaron, I bet RPM's from Washington.

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Sales tax?? You shouldn't be paying SALES tax on flight TRAINING in any state.

 

The only time you might be taxed in a sales tax state is if your instructor is an independant contractor that is being paid seperately......because then you're just renting the helicopter from the flight school and receiving the instruction from another "business".

 

I always wrote receipts as "Dual Flight Instruction" or "Supervised Solo Flight Instruction" so that the only time our students paid sales tax was during rental.

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Guest rookie101
Not Washington..abit farther....Ontario,Canada :P

 

Thanks for the lead to the topic on hillsboro..!! Very expesive to train in Canada R-22=$ 425-500/HR

300C=$ 495/HR

B47 =$450-500 + /HR

 

:o

God Bless America!!!!

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Hi all,

 

Any opinions on the above listed helo flight schools..?? Experienced flight instructors..?? Training areas..??

 

For those of you looking for training schools the state of Oregon does not have sales tax which would offer a nice discount on the overall cost of training..!!

 

Any current or former students feel free to reply :)

 

THANKS.

 

No tax on training in California either...Doug :P

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Not Washington..abit farther....Ontario,Canada :P

 

Thanks for the lead to the topic on hillsboro..!! Very expesive to train in Canada R-22=$ 425-500/HR

300C=$ 495/HR

B47 =$450-500 + /HR

Wow - Yeah, you'll never see me EVER complain about prices down here!
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thats Canbuck dollars convert to US and it's not as bad.

Huh?? :huh: With the Canadian dollar currently up to ~90 cents/US$ that makes the

R22 = US$380 - US$447 /HR

300C = US$443 /HR

B47 = US$403 - US$447+ /HR.

Where in the US is charging anything close to that?? It's OUTRAGEOUS! <_>

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Not Washington..abit farther....Ontario,Canada :P

 

Thanks for the lead to the topic on hillsboro..!! Very expesive to train in Canada R-22=$ 425-500/HR

300C=$ 495/HR

B47 =$450-500 + /HR

EGADS!!! The R-22 here is about $200.

 

Also, have you looked into that one school...wait, you said Ontario? Je ne parle Francais.

 

You might look into some of the East coast schools or, depending on your location, Michigan or New York. I bet you could find plenty in your local area-U.S. I mean. But for that home-town country feel, come to rainy Corvallis, Oregon located in the Great Pacific Northwet.

 

Sorry, it was raining today :lol: .

 

Later

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I would check out Precision FLight Training, They have a great school that focuses on one on one training. In the past three years all of there CFI graduates have gotten jobs. They train beyond the FAA standards and the employers like that.

 

Additionally PFT is located at an airport in Class G airspace not at a towered airport like hillsboro. This means you get more flying days than at hillsborro. And there is no sales tax on rentals or flight instruction at PFT.

 

Check them out at www.flyprecision.com

 

 

 

 

Hi all,

 

Any opinions on the above listed helo flight schools..?? Experienced flight instructors..?? Training areas..??

 

For those of you looking for training schools the state of Oregon does not have sales tax which would offer a nice discount on the overall cost of training..!!

 

Any current or former students feel free to reply :)

 

THANKS.

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Hi all,

 

Any opinions on the above listed helo flight schools..?? Experienced flight instructors..?? Training areas..??

 

For those of you looking for training schools the state of Oregon does not have sales tax which would offer a nice discount on the overall cost of training..!!

 

Any current or former students feel free to reply :)

 

THANKS.

 

 

No tax in Arizona on training and no costly weather delays!

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OK, well I am a SUPER newbie just getting the gears turning on this helo training thing also (this happens to be my first post). I live in Bend, OR and have been checking out Oregon training places. It seems that the most noteable ones I have found so far are Precision, Applebee, and Silverstate. One thing that I'm wondering (and your thoughts on these schools are appreciated) is whether it's better to train in the Schweizer 300C or the R-22. I've read that the R-22 is widely used but is somewhat frowned upon by employers as a training rig as it has a slightly "unstandard" cockpit and is more difficult to learn in.

 

REALISTICLY: How long could one expect to take to go from the first flight to getting paid as an instructor...then to commercial.

 

HOW THE HELL DO YOU PEOPLE PAY FOR IT??? $50K-$80 almost seems impossible. I'm assuming one MUST work a day job and somehow squeeze in flight training?....and have impeccable credit?

 

Is it smarter (financially) to get fixed wing certification BEFORE going for the chopper? Obviously, you'd be a little more marketable with both but is it necessary?

 

I'm sure there are answers to questions like that posted all over this forum...I'll go do some more reading now that I've got these questions off my chest.

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OK, well I am a SUPER newbie just getting the gears turning on this helo training thing also (this happens to be my first post). I live in Bend, OR and have been checking out Oregon training places. It seems that the most noteable ones I have found so far are Precision, Applebee, and Silverstate. One thing that I'm wondering (and your thoughts on these schools are appreciated) is whether it's better to train in the Schweizer 300C or the R-22. I've read that the R-22 is widely used but is somewhat frowned upon by employers as a training rig as it has a slightly "unstandard" cockpit and is more difficult to learn in.

 

REALISTICLY: How long could one expect to take to go from the first flight to getting paid as an instructor...then to commercial.

 

HOW THE HELL DO YOU PEOPLE PAY FOR IT??? $50K-$80 almost seems impossible. I'm assuming one MUST work a day job and somehow squeeze in flight training?....and have impeccable credit?

 

Is it smarter (financially) to get fixed wing certification BEFORE going for the chopper? Obviously, you'd be a little more marketable with both but is it necessary?

 

I'm sure there are answers to questions like that posted all over this forum...I'll go do some more reading now that I've got these questions off my chest.

 

Which helicopter to train in? The greatest question of all time (or at least since Frank started making the R22). You comment on the R22 being frowned upon by employers is not correct as probably 2/3 of all flight schools use the R22 and there is no rumble within the industry about the "unstandard" cockpit. I assume you are talking about the "teetering" cyclic. While I'm not a big fan to the set-up, there is nothing wrong with it and if you've never flown anything else, you are not going to have anything to judge it against and will feel comfortable with the arrangement. Personally, I prefer the 300 over the R22, but each has it's strong and weak points.

 

Of the three schools you mentioned, Precision would be my pick.

 

Paying for your training can be done several way. Many schools can get loans from SallieMae for their students. Pilot Career Foundation is a great way to go, but they have a hold on getting loans at this point in time. They issue a flight card that the school charges when you fly and PCF manages the loan for the student to ensure that there is no problems with the school getting all of your loan money before you ever start flying.

 

The timeline that you are looking for is going to depend greatly upon you. Are you going to train full time or are you training part time? If you go full time it will take about nine months to finish your training and get to 200 hours. If you train part time, it's going to depend on how often you come out and fly. The time it take to go from CFI to your next job is going to depend on how busy of a flight school that you get on with. If you only have a coulpe of students, it's going to take quite a while. If you get on with a busy flight school, they look at taking 12-18 months to get to the 1,000 hour PIC point.

 

If you want to be a helicopter pilot, don't spend your money on flying fixed-wing. The insurance companies don't care if you are an airplane pilot, they want to know how much helicpoter time that you have. So, you still have to spend your money to get the 200 hours per SFAR 73 (if you are flying the R22). As for being marketable, you are going to need a lot of time in airplanes to be marketable (plus your commercial multi-engine instrument), and then flying both pretty much only sets you up as a corporate pilot.

 

Hope this helps answer your questions.

 

Doug

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Welcome A-Low - as usual Doug has hit the nail squarely on the head as far as giving you useful information. I would add only a couple of points. If I were looking at schools in Oregon I would certainly look at Hillsboro in addition to your first two choices.

 

The only people that frown on using the R22 as a trainer and perpetuate the myth you relate are the people not using it! Employers in industry care about your total helicopter time and your ability to fly the helicopter and to treat their equipment with respect (not cost them more $$$$). You can learn those skills in either training helicopter. Unfortunately if you don't train in a R22 you won't have the 50 hours (in the R22, 200 hours in helicopters) necessary per SFAR 73 to teach in one. That would limit your options for that first job you are likely to pursue as a flight instructor, since MOST schools use the R22. That being said, most schools utilizing the S300 are going to have insurance requirements for you to teach in one, which seem to be about 25 hours in-type (that means in a S300). There are in fact some jobs in the industry that utilize Robinson helicopters for other than training so those employers would want to see as much Robinson time as possible.

 

I would echo Doug's comments regards fixed-wing & helicopter time. You need helicopter time to fly helicopters and you need quite a bit of fixed-wing time to influence an employer's view of your total flying time.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hi, There is a new helicopter school in Bend, Oregon. Leading Edge Aviation. Fleet of R22's One R44 and a Bell Jet Ranger. They have financing and are connected to Central Oregon Cummunity College. They are also a Robinson Dealer. They have an Faa examiner on Staff also. Contact Travis at: twarthen@leadingedgeavn.com

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