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Ground Training


A.J.
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I'm curious, does everybody who start out at ground training pass the class?

and does it get easier or harder after the ground training part?

 

Cause I'm going through ground training and it's really hard to understand and I'm thinking of giving up.

All the information and what they mean, the mechanics, what's on the written test ect...

 

It feels like I'm the only one who doesn't understand and if I say that I don't understand I feel like everybody is looking at me and saying askdfdkjlfs.

 

Does anybody feel this way?

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Ground training will get easier once you start flying. Just like for those who start flying first, the flying gets easier once you start ground training.

 

That's becuase the two compliment each other.

 

Having said that, it is hard. You need to read, ask, watch all the time.

 

Joker

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"It feels like I'm the only one who doesn't understand and if I say that I don't understand I feel like everybody is looking at me and saying askdfdkjlfs."

 

 

First off, A.J. the only stupid question is the one NOT asked

 

ask away, interupt, what ever you need to understand, don't wait, as Joker said it will become clearer as time goes on. but don't sit there in a state of confusion and not be able to keep up. it is a complicated field.

stay at it, it'll get better. ;)

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I remember doing ground school a long time ago. Ground school was required before flight. Air Force rules you know. Anyhow, if you have a mechanical background, it should go easier for you. If not, then try getting close to a machine and look at it. Move the controls. See what happens to the linkages and pushrods. Try looking at one of those "Visable Engine" models. Find a science-physical-museum in your area and look at what makes things tick.

 

Talk to FBO"s and see if you can listen to radio calls. Talk to other pilots, even fix wing, and pick their brains. Listen to what they have to say. Talk to the chief A&P if you can. Look at weather websites. Find meteorology, navigation, GPS, and early aircraft books. Read about Sikorsky.

 

There are a miltitude of test prep books at the bookstores and libraries. I found that you'll probably not need them, but that's my opinion.

 

BUT MOST OF ALL' ENJOY!!!!!!!

 

Later.

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Ground training will get easier once you start flying. Just like for those who start flying first, the flying gets easier once you start ground training.

 

That's becuase the two compliment each other.

 

Having said that, it is hard. You need to read, ask, watch all the time.

 

Joker

 

 

 

Ditto to Joker- use the free web services and buy a couple basic handbooks that explain in detail what your instructor is trying to show you. Then you can review on your own time, and ask a few questions on whats not clear at your next session.

 

You can take free FAA style tests on line...check out www.mywrittenexam.com ot the aopa.org site for manuals..

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Hey A.J.,

 

I second what Joker and Goldy said.

 

I took ground school before I started flying because it was all I could afford at the time (17-18 years old) and I also wanted to make sure I could pass the written before I started investing in flying (fixed wing). At the time, ground school seemed to be a lot of memorizing things I didn't fully understand. At the end of ground school an FAA examiner came to class to administer the exam. Not everyone took it, but I did and passed. Things became much more clear after I starting flying. ("Oh, THAT'S what that was about!") Anyway, hang in there! I think it will get easier for you!

 

The only downside to passing your written before you start flying is that you've got the clock started on taking your check ride before your written expires (2 years). [And I had to relearn things like FAA reclassifying airspace - ARSA to Class C, etc. in between my written and oral exams.] I finished just in time at age 19. Working all week at a low paying job while going to school just to spend my paycheck each weekend on flying wasn't the easy route. It took me about 65 hours over 1.5 years for Private Pilot Fixed Wing SEL, but I loved every minute of it! Hopefully you'll be able to fly more often than I was, and the time constraints won't be felt.

 

That was my experience 12 years ago and now I'm considering the plunge into rotor wing...

 

Good Luck!

Ryan

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I'm sorry to disappoint all you guys but I've decided to drop out of the class and pursue another field.

 

I should've said it earlier, the class wasn't for helicopters, it was for the private pilot license.

 

It wasn't that costly since it was held at a community college, I was more curious than interested I guess.

 

I'm not one of those people who dreamed of being a airplane or heli pilot when I was young. It was only a sudden interest because I attended a SSH seminar.

 

You can find my posts in the SSH Class Action Suit topic...don't worry I'm not among the ones that are suing, I was one of the lucky ones and got out before they started their training program.

 

I guess the good news is that I know I don't want to be a pilot.

I never knew how hard it is to become one, now I know.

 

As I've heard from some people before, it's not for everyone.

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