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I lost my rotor.


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Went and flew patterns today. Whilst doing the downwind check, I got to the tach and was suprised to notice that the rotor tach needle was sitting nicely at the bottom of the gauge. Well, this was quite unexpected. I then inform my IP, who is sitting next to me, that the rotor is gone. He looks up and says nonchalantly "No it's not, see, it's still spinning." "No, the tach." I reply

 

It turns out that he just wanted to see if I was actually looking or just saying what I was supposed to be looking at. He pushed the breaker back in and the needle went back to 100 or so.

 

Well,that made for an interesting moment. A few more approaches and we called it a day.

 

Later.

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That's a nice touch...

 

It is good to know that the Instructor is checking you and ultimately has your best interests at heart. I liked it when my instructor did those kinds of things too. Always keeps the rapport going, the flight more interesting and always checking is a good habit to get into - if not simply to stop him/her catching you out at other times in the future.

 

Nice pic by the way. I take it you have an X-wing fighter licence or something too.

 

I just remembered - not sure if this is usual or not: My Instructor knew I was going for the Commercial when I started. For about the first 20 or so flying hours (maybe more I forget) he actually didn't tell me much about the governor and indeed I thought it was normal not to use it. All those hours later when he told me we can use it - things felt a little easier.

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No, TIE fighter.

 

Actually, I'd like to get one of those Stormtrooper costumes and set the helmet up for comms. Then fly to a Star Wars convention somewhere.

 

And I'd kill for an MG34. That's what they used in the movie, along with other old firearms. Did you notice that Han Solos blaster was actually a Broomhandle Mauser? Then I'd like to get an MG42 and MP44. The Nazis did some good with those firearms. 98k too.

 

Back to the costome, those things cost a lot. The helmet alone is a couple hundred dollars. Less if you get a kit.

 

So, keep your ATAT out of my sector and we'll get along fine. May the force be with you.

 

Later.

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Guest rookie101
No, TIE fighter.

 

Actually, I'd like to get one of those Stormtrooper costumes and set the helmet up for comms. Then fly to a Star Wars convention somewhere.

 

And I'd kill for an MG34. That's what they used in the movie, along with other old firearms. Did you notice that Han Solos blaster was actually a Broomhandle Mauser? Then I'd like to get an MG42 and MP44. The Nazis did some good with those firearms. 98k too.

 

Back to the costome, those things cost a lot. The helmet alone is a couple hundred dollars. Less if you get a kit.

 

So, keep your ATAT out of my sector and we'll get along fine. May the force be with you.

 

Later.

 

Wow....... :mellow: . I don't know whether to be scared or impressed that you know that Witch. I will just say, interesting. However, it does make sense that they used weapons like the MG-34, they are pretty odd looking.

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Wow....... :mellow: . I don't know whether to be scared or impressed that you know that Witch.

 

I don't blame you. It's a curse to have a brain the size of a planet.

 

Later

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So what would have happened if the engine had then quit? Now you have no tach whatsoever. I never liked the idea of pulling circuit breakers especially when you are removing one of the required instruments for flight (even if you can get it back) Just my opion though.

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I suppose if the engine had quit-which it can't-when a breaker was pulled, then we autorotate. My IP would have taken the stick and put us down in the middle of the patch that the combines were cutting. No problem.

 

Anyway, I think I can trust him enough to not let us crash. He's already caught me several times and saved the day. I just hope that when I get a student, I can react enough to not crash. After all, crashing sucks.

 

Later.

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That's funny as almost the same thing happened to me yesterday. We had finished the lesson and had just come in to a hover at the school's field when the rotor needle dropped to zero. I guess I am learning something as I instantly knew it was the gauge. I was still in the air so it couldn't be right. We found that the cable drive from the tail rotor had broken. It was nothing I did but I felt bad as the guy after me didn't get to fly.

 

I suppose if the engine had quit-which it can't-when a breaker was pulled, then we autorotate. My IP would have taken the stick and put us down in the middle of the patch that the combines were cutting. No problem.

 

Anyway, I think I can trust him enough to not let us crash. He's already caught me several times and saved the day. I just hope that when I get a student, I can react enough to not crash. After all, crashing sucks.

 

Later.

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That's funny as almost the same thing happened to me yesterday. We had finished the lesson and had just come in to a hover at the school's field when the rotor needle dropped to zero. I guess I am learning something as I instantly knew it was the gauge. I was still in the air so it couldn't be right. We found that the cable drive from the tail rotor had broken. It was nothing I did but I felt bad as the guy after me didn't get to fly.

 

 

Cable drive? enstrom??

 

Too bad it wasnt a Bell 47..you just use your ears for that one, dont need a RPM gauge..

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Cable drive? enstrom??

 

Too bad it wasnt a Bell 47..you just use your ears for that one, dont need a RPM gauge..

 

Yes, Enstrom 280FX. Even with the noise cancelling headsets I can hear the engine clearly. I'll bet its pretty loud without them. I've never been in a Bell 47. I'm guessing they are pretty loud?

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That's funny as almost the same thing happened to me yesterday. We had finished the lesson and had just come in to a hover at the school's field when the rotor needle dropped to zero. I guess I am learning something as I instantly knew it was the gauge. I was still in the air so it couldn't be right. We found that the cable drive from the tail rotor had broken.

 

Oh, I was flying a Cherokee and was coming back to the airport when it happened. I was coming up to the hill by the prison and I saw the tach needle was at 0. "Oh crap" I thought, Gotta find a place to land.

 

Then it hit me. I couldn't see the prop. I grabbed the throttle and reved the engine. Well, how about that, I still have power.

 

I then made a normal landing, told Bob, and red X'ed the plane. The tach cable broke, no problem.

 

Later.

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Yes, Enstrom 280FX. Even with the noise cancelling headsets I can hear the engine clearly. I'll bet its pretty loud without them. I've never been in a Bell 47. I'm guessing they are pretty loud?

 

Never flown an enstrom, but i fly the bell 47 3 days a week and when you fly that often you just tune in the sound of the proper rpm... almost never check the guage anymore... unless i'm in an auto of course.

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Yes, Enstrom 280FX. Even with the noise cancelling headsets I can hear the engine clearly. I'll bet its pretty loud without them. I've never been in a Bell 47. I'm guessing they are pretty loud?

 

Brian, with the Bell 47 is not really that they are loud, its that perfect whoosh sound that you listen for. The minute you dont hear it, you've dropped a bit of rotor RPM. I know its sounds a lil bizarre but you can hear it by ear first, then a quick look at the instruments confirms what you already know.

 

I dont know if there are other birds that have such a unique characteristic....certainly the R22 does not...I cant tell by sound at all...

 

I'm still jealous, I would love to find an Enstrom sitting around in Los Angeles somewhere that needs some flying...its certainly a good looking helicopter and Ive always wanted to get checked out in one....someday !

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Went flying again today and dang if my IP didn't pull the rotor tach breaker again. This time I saw him do it and when the needle fell, I said to him "Ok, push the breaker back in or no ice cream!". He just turned and looked at me and gave me the cheshire cat grin. I may have to shoot him with my spank ray.

 

Something strange happened. I came in on the approach, got into a shallow hover, and set it down without twisting and very softly. I put the collective down, looked at mt IP and said "What the hell was that?". It was like a textbook landing-like on Airwolf.

 

What astounded me next was when I pulled up on the collective, I went into a very stable hover about 6" off the ground. Dang, there's something wrong here. Why am I flying so well?

 

I also got to experience the "Hover Auto" All I can say is there sure is a lot of torque there. Enough to turn the bird on it'd skids. CRRUUUNNNNCCCCCHHHHHHHHHH

My IP just laughs-nervously.

 

I'm liking this flying thing.

 

Later

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I used to pull the circuit breaker for the engine instrument cluster all the time on students. "Gauges green, warning lights out" was something we checked before t/o and in the pattern at least once.

 

Well, I'd pull the breaker and hear that phrase at least a half dozen times.....I'd watch and they would look at the gauge, but not actually interpret what it said (nothing). I'd push it back in for a second or two to check it myself, but after about 20 minutes I'd tell them what I did. It only took a few times of that trick, before they caught on and start actually reading the gauge.

 

Of course there was that one time........My student freaked out and entered an auto when he saw he didn't have any oil pressure.

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I used to pull the circuit breaker for the engine instrument cluster all the time on students. "Gauges green, warning lights out" was something we checked before t/o and in the pattern at least once.

 

Well, I'd pull the breaker and hear that phrase at least a half dozen times.....I'd watch and they would look at the gauge, but not actually interpret what it said (nothing). I'd push it back in for a second or two to check it myself, but after about 20 minutes I'd tell them what I did. It only took a few times of that trick, before they caught on and start actually reading the gauge.

 

I did that to every student, and every one of them missed it the first time, and many missed it the second and third times. They all caught on sooner or later, and really do read the gauges now.

 

Of course there was that one time........My student freaked out and entered an auto when he saw he didn't have any oil pressure.

 

A good learning experience for both of you! :)

 

It should have taught the student not to over react to gauges, and to not turn a broken gauge into a real emergency.

 

In the turbine helicopters I fly that have fire detectors, the first rule is that if you get a fire light, look for secondary indications. That can include other gauges, as well as just turning the helicopter 30 degrees and looking for a smoke trail. Popping the floats and putting it in the water for a faulty gauge kinda pisses the company off. :)

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