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Solo hours


Tom M
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Tom,

 

I solo'd around 23 hours, BUT everyone's learning curve is different. Also, it depends how frequently you fly too. Then there's my buddy, who has 65 hours, but hasn't solo'd! BUT, he's switched instructors 3 times, ran out of money, got it back, but he wasn't in a hurry...obviously! Now that he passed his written, he's starting back again, so maybe he'll solo pretty soon! I hope.....or take up sailing instead! :)

 

You'll get frusturated, but just hang in there.....that 6th Pilots Sensory....will just come to you one day!

 

R91

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I am just passing my 20 hour mark in the R22 and wondering at what point others have made their first solo flight.

 

I am targeting to do so before 30 hours... is that realistic from what others have done?

 

Tom

 

flew solo in the R22 @ 28.7 hours...(just looked in my logbook) It is certainly doable... Good luck and let us know how it goes!

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Tom- A year from now, you wont care if you solo'ed at 30 hours or 40 or whatever....do it when you know youre ready, and your CFI knows youre ready.

 

But, for the record, I was at 28 I think. Lucky to fly 2 times in the same month, it takes a bit longer to remember what the long skinny thing does !!

 

 

Rotor- Rob, glad to hear your buddy is flying again....I was up tonight, great weather, maybe I'll run into him in the valley ( well..not literally...bumping helicopters can have adverse effects !)

 

c ya.

 

Goldy

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Ditto what Goldy said. I did my first solo at 40 hours, but I was going for the Commercial and we were too busy doing cross country and having lot's of fun, so the first solo wasn't a hurry for any reason. Best to keep things smooth, safe, communicate how you feel to your instructor and follow his or her advice.

 

It isn't a competition how you get there - just do get there - and get there safely.

 

:)

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Tom- A year from now, you wont care if you solo'ed at 30 hours or 40 or whatever....do it when you know youre ready, and your CFI knows youre ready.

AMEN! You won't care or probably even remember the hours. You'd sure remember if you push to do it in a certain number of hours and try before you're ready! :o

 

...it takes a bit longer to remember what the long skinny thing does !!

What the heck does the "long skinny thing" do?? :huh: :blink: :lol:

 

...bumping helicopters can have adverse effects !

An astonishing tale of "trading paint" and surviving!! :blink: :blink: :o

N206AC & N5735A

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AMEN! You won't care or probably even remember the hours. You'd sure remember if you push to do it in a certain number of hours and try before you're ready! :o

What the heck does the "long skinny thing" do?? :huh: :blink: :lol:

An astonishing tale of "trading paint" and surviving!! :blink: :blink: :o

N206AC & N5735A

 

 

The long skinny thing I was speaking of makes you go up and down....I guess that statement could be interpreted a few different ways.

 

NTSB report is unbelieveable ! First, I cannot see two birds both with main rotor strikes and both land safely..almost unheard of !

 

But wasnt one at fault? Why were they on two different freq's and yet the NTSB mentions no problem with this?? They are either in one airspace or the other, right? Isnt that what those funny blue and magenta circles are around airports? Am I missing something here ? This is the exact scenario I run into in several areas of L.A....aircraft converging in the same area, talking on 3 different freqs...very scary sometimes.

 

For those in L.A. does Newhall Pass ring any bells ?

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...NTSB report is unbelieveable ! First, I cannot see two birds both with main rotor strikes and both land safely..almost unheard of !

 

But wasnt one at fault? Why were they on two different freq's and yet the NTSB mentions no problem with this?? They are either in one airspace or the other, right? Isnt that what those funny blue and magenta circles are around airports? Am I missing something here ? This is the exact scenario I run into in several areas of L.A....aircraft converging in the same area, talking on 3 different freqs...very scary sometimes...

Yeah, nearly inconceivable isn't it? It can't come ANY closer than that!

 

The ENG aircraft was on the common traffic advisory frequency (CTAF) for Lake Union (122.90), an area of a high concentration of float-plane activity he was passing through just north of (and outside) Boeing Field's class Delta airspace. The other helicopter had just departed Boeing, cleared their airspace, and switched to Seattle Radio (122.50), presumably to open his flight plan? I think the NTSB's report emphasizes the fact that they were on different frequencies to point out that contributing factor, but doesn't assign fault based on that because both pilots were on appropriate frequencies.

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