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OK, so Mike and I are doing patterns-I still suck-when he tells me to go to the compass rose on the abandoned runway. Once there he tells me that we're going to play a game called "Cones".

 

The object of the game is to, with the front part of the skid, knock a traffic cone onto its side. He then takes the stick and retrieves the cone by putting the cone onto the skid. Now this in itself is pretty fun. Even one of the guys in the combine-they were getting the hay-had to stop and watch us for a while. Anyway, Mike won putting four cones on the skid while it took me many tries to knock them over. I even landed on one crushing it a little under the skid. I tried a few times to pick one up, but I couldn't seem to get low enough. Bad depth perception?

 

We then did other stuff and called it a day.

 

Here's a question fer ya; Have any of you played this game, or any other helo games? Do tell.

 

On another topic, I'm going to try and build a platform to mount onto the skid so that I can mount a video camera on it. I have a basic design, so maybe in a few weeks I can get some clips for ya'll.

 

Later.

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Yeah that's fun. We practiced that too. (R22)

 

Usually with just 2 cones. Knock the cone over - slide the skid in and then hover around with 2 bright red rubber exocet missiles. :)

 

Then slide out and stand them up.

 

My personal favourite thing to do in solo flights (might be boring for some of you) was simply to fly to North Perry airfield to a large concrete rectangular area on the field and practice hovering around the edge, forwards and mostly sideways. To be honest, I'd always have the idea of rescue in mind when doing that.

 

Anyway, it all beats sitting in an office as a lifestyle!

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We were also thinking of landing on the hay bales and seeing if they'd support the weight.

 

There's also some railroad tracks at the end of the runway and a train was going by. I asked Mike if he'd like to land on it. His response was "Mission Impossible 3?". Dang, where's the Chunnel when you need it?

 

Still having fun though, even though my landings still suck.

 

Later.

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When out with the instructor we used to play the game "Can I land there?"

 

Basically just look for the smallest hole in the trees and see if you get get it done. Sometimes yes, sometimes no, but a very valuable learning experience.

 

Every now and then we'd shut down when in a really tight spot so we could hop out and get an outside perspective on it. What felt like a super tight area from inside the heli, we saw was very do-able from the outside.

 

Tightest spot I ever squeezed into (with the instructor) saw a tree 3 feet from the tail rotor, another tree 4 feet from the front of the main rotor and branches overhanging 12 feet above. Wish I had a camera!

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...he tells me that we're going to play a game called "Cones".
Here's a harder (and safer) variation. Put the front of the right skid on top of the cone. Keep it there without knocking over or crushing the cone. Now keep it there while you do a pirouette around the cone. Now do it with the left skid. Now the heel of the skid.

 

As others have alluded to, fooling with objects down on the ground is an invite to rollover - it is also a talent you would never use "in the real world". Using the top of a standing cone means your skids are two feet from the ground. If you knock the cone over, set down and get one of you out to stand it back up. A good rule of thumb for helicopter "games", is if it all went pear-shaped, how would the NTSB report look?

On another topic, I'm going to try and build a platform to mount onto the skid so that I can mount a video camera on it. I have a basic design, so maybe in a few weeks I can get some clips for ya'll.
Careful - the FAA tends to frown on unapproved attachments to aircraft. Have a trip through the FARs before you begin!
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Hmmm.

 

I never played this game, and don't think I'm any worse off for that.

 

I to agree that whilst fun (and fun is good), hooking cones on the skid tube then knocking it over is possibly not a good assessment of risk for an instructional situation. The only movement with the skids 1 foot (a cone's diameter) above the ground should be forward for the purpose of landing.

 

An engine failure (or even just a cough) just at the point when you are succeeding to knock the cone down with a nice sideswipe might end up having to explain an embarrassing roll!

 

Hovering round the sqaure with turns, hovering around a sqaure without turns**, pivot around a point (cone as fling suggests), and pivot around the tail are all good skills to learn and can be made fun challenges for the student. These are all done with skids about 2 feet off the ground.

 

Just my 2 cents.

 

Joker

 

** Instructors and students must take great care whenever hovering backwards. It should be performed very slowly. These hovering exercises are 'accuracy' challenges NOT speed challenges. It should be stressed that this is a training exercise and not a maneuver commonly practiced in the non-training environment.

 

As for the camera mount attachment, unless you have a field approaval for it, or it comes with an STC, if you will negate the airworthiness of your aircraft. You may also inadvertantly reduce the load bearing capabilities of the skid tube or the aerodynamic qualities of the aircraft. I wouldn't bother with this.

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Here's a harder (and safer) variation. Put the front of the right skid on top of the cone. Keep it there without knocking over or crushing the cone. Now keep it there while you do a pirouette around the cone. Now do it with the left skid. Now the heel of the skid.

 

As others have alluded to, fooling with objects down on the ground is an invite to rollover - it is also a talent you would never use "in the real world". Using the top of a standing cone means your skids are two feet from the ground. If you knock the cone over, set down and get one of you out to stand it back up. A good rule of thumb for helicopter "games", is if it all went pear-shaped, how would the NTSB report look?Careful - the FAA tends to frown on unapproved attachments to aircraft. Have a trip through the FARs before you begin!

 

My idea for the mount includes a pin that goes into the mount for the ground wheels and two hose clamps. Should take about 15 minutes to attach and remove. One of the A&P's was telling me that as long as it was not permanent he had no objection. The owner of the school doesn't mind either. I bet he'd want a copy of the tape though.

 

The pirouette around the cone thing is what Nick did today. I couldn't see it but he did pirouette. I tried to pick up a cone. I tried a dozen times but just couldn't get it there. We then did a confined landing on a gravel bar where Nick got out and took a couple of pictures. I need to remember to E-mail those to my Mom and Dad and Brother-he's jealous. We then tried the cone again. No luck, so after a couple of hoverautos, I tried the cone again, and got it. Nick asked what I was going to do now? I said "Fox One!". He took it off for me because my hovering was getting shakey. Tired I guess.

 

So, another fun day with traffic cones. I tried to set one upright a few times, but the closer I get to the ground, the more I over correct. That's why it took so long to spear one.

 

I'll suggest the stacking thing to Mike next week. This a lot more fun than flying a Cessna.

 

Later.

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My idea for the mount includes a pin that goes into the mount for the ground wheels and two hose clamps. Should take about 15 minutes to attach and remove. One of the A&P's was telling me that as long as it was not permanent he had no objection. The owner of the school doesn't mind either.
:blink:

 

I'm sure your idea is ingenious, but you'd better check with your local FSDO on what is allowable. They may express more concern than owner and mechanic at your school on the legality of attaching (even "temporarily") an unapproved camera mount to the skid of the helicopter.

 

OTOH, videos of an actual dynamic rollover ar few and far between, especially a skid's-eye view!

 

Your whole career as a helicopter pilot will be making judgement calls - many times you will be presented all kinds of compelling reasons to do things which violate regs, aircraft limitations or are just unsafe. You may do them and "get away with it". You may not. The only way to ensure you always get away with it is not to do them. You seem to be learning from folks who may be highly skilled, but are willing to test the boundaries of good judgement, and pass those values on to you. This is too bad.

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Your whole career as a helicopter pilot will be making judgement calls - many times there will be all kinds of compelling reasons to do things which violate regs, aircraft limitations or are just unsafe. You may do them and "get away with it". You may not. The only way to ensure you always get away with it is not to do them. You seem to be learning from folks who may be highly skilled, but are willing to test the boundaries of good judgement, and pass those values on to you. This is too bad.

 

Couldn't have said it better myself...

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Guest pokey

The main entrance ( for cars) to my airport passes an open area of the airplane parking ramp. There is a sign for motorists "parking to the right", but some ppls i guess dont read signs & end up driving all over the ramp & taxiways looking for the restaurant parking. At times someone puts a few cones up to ward off these lost motorists, & "herd" them to the car parking lot. These cones are about 30 yards from the self service fuel tank/pumps. On weekends there are alot of fixed wingers coming in for lunch/fuel & gets verrry busy ! AND? the helicopter ALWAYS needs fuel at the busiest time near the fuel pump, of korse ! The hose is very long and i try to stay away from the planes as best as i can,,,,,,usually means getting as close to those cones, a shed, some small shrubs, the "parking" sign as i dare to. Those cones scare me tho ! Maybe we have light weight cones, but? the rotor wash "moves" them if i get too close & i worry they may blow into the tail rotor or a plane. Moral of story? i try my best to stay clear of ANYTHING that aint nailed down, that includes traffic cones, fixed wing tails, control surfaces and WHY do fixed wing pilots like to leave their planes unattended w/ the doors open?! :rolleyes:

 

As far as the camera mount? I recommend doing it the "legal" way: Work with the A&P, come up w/ a design that will do the job, place X-tra emphasis on safety/locking devices. Do NOT fly the aircraft w/ the design installed yet tho ! Take some pictures, a few drawings, mabe even a calculation 0r 2 0r 3. Take this to your FAA office & ask them if they will give you an experimental airworthiness certificate for this installation while it is installed on the aircraft. Your std certificate will be good again once the mount/camera is removed. BEFORE you go thru this trouble tho? check with your insurance company & make sure you will still be covered under the experimental certificate ! If not, no matter what reason for wreckage--you will be responsible for any liabilities/damage.

 

Oh ! also i dont like to hover/fly over: loose stones, gravel, fresh cut grass, leaves,,,,,,,,,

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I was hovering yesterday and it was for crap. I was hardly moving the stick but fighting the machine to keep from doing a pendulum swing. We kept swinging back and forth. I started singing 'Rock-a-bye Baby 'cause that's what it felt like. Another five minutes of that and I'd have fallen asleep.
So, another fun day with traffic cones. I tried to set one upright a few times, but the closer I get to the ground, the more I over correct. That's why it took so long to spear one.

 

Based on your posts yesterday (in this and the other thread), my only assessment is that your man Nick and his buddy Mike have bigger balls than me if they are playing cones with students at that level of profficiency. This sounds more like an ego trip for the instructors to me.

 

My plea goes out to all instructors again and again...don't spend more than 5-10 minutes per lesson doing hover practice in the first few hours of flying. You are wasting the student's money.

 

Witch, what you read here are only posters' opinions, and you its up to you whether you choose to take on board the advice you read here, or not. In fact, no one can really blame you for what appears to me a misjudgement in risk analysis by your instructor. However, to me it does seem a little early to be doing activities such as you describe.

 

So have a chat with your instructor or invite him onto this list if he wants to discuss. Afterall, he may have thought things through very carefully and be able to change my views. At the moment however, I remain skeptical.

 

Same goes for the external camera mount idea. Pokey gives some sound advice on this.

 

Just for your reference, here's a definition straight from FAR 1.1 (my emphasis).

 

Major alteration means an alteration not listed in the aircraft, aircraft engine, or propeller specifications--

(1) That might appreciably affect weight, balance, structural strength, performance, powerplant operation, flight characteristics, or other qualities affecting airworthiness; or

(2) That is not done according to accepted practices or cannot be done by elementary operations.

 

If you can argue that your external skid-mounted camera mount does not fit the defintion above, then great...go for it. Otherwise, I think you need either form 337 with Field Approval or STC, or (as Pokey says) to be operating under an experimental certificate.

 

More food for thought?!

 

Joker

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Guest pokey
More food for thought?!

 

Joker

 

YES ! Joker, i should have pointed out that 337 was an option also ! Years ago (maybe 10) the FAA would give field approvals like they handed out donuts & coffee at their meetings. NOT anymore tho. Back in '94 i designed/fabricated/built/welded/installed an 18 gallon aux fuel tank in my friends Cessna 182,,,, FAA inspector came out, (day after i called him too! ) we talked & had donuts & coffee for a while, he looked at the 337 & then glanced at the installation, stamped my 337, signed it & voilla ! field approval :)

 

Rey ( the FAA inspector) retired, & a few years later & i wanted to install a heater muff on my 300. ( similar to what fixed wing airplanes use)-- the 300 oil cooler heater is useless on a very cold day if there is no sun out. SO? i call FAA & ask if they could come out & give me field approval for my 337 design/installation. They requested drawings & told me that they would need to send them to their engineering department for review, but suggested that i apply for an experimental certificate. I never did & now just "bundle-up" on those cold days B)

 

Remember, a 337 is for major alteration/repair done by "acceptable methods" ie: STC, 43.13, field approval, manufacter's approved data...

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The camera idea reminds me of an incident with a fellow I trained with.

 

Our instructor had no problem with us taking cameras, video or still, on our flights so long as we didn't neglect our flying and focus on the camera shots.

 

So this one student comes up with a curious rig using a tripod that he secured to the floor on the left side somehow. It seemed to work great.

 

He flys into another airport on a cross country flight and lands on the ramp and shuts down for fuel. All gassed up and running again, he remembers to turn on the camera for the flight home. He leans over and switches it to record. As he straightens up in the seat his sleave gets caught on the throttle and revs the engine way into the red for an instant before he is able to correct it.

 

The machine was fine, but he felt like a total idiot and the instructor was furious.

 

My point, don't let the film over-ride your obligation to the safety of your flight. Have a pax do your filming for you. I did and it always turned out great.

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Dang guys, kick me in the head why don't ya?

 

The mount is in the thinking stage with the beginnings of a cardboard mockup. The mount will be held with hose clamps on the rear strut and possibly with a few layers of duct tape for good measure. The whole thing will weigh maybe five pounds. I ain't putting a panaflex I-Max camera on it, but rather a small camcorder in the Hi8 format. I was thinking of securing the whole thing from falling off in flight by attaching a 1/8" steel cable around it too. But like I said-thinking stage.

 

My brother is an engineer with an aerospace-that sound neat, aerospace-company. I'm going to run the idea by him and maybe he'll do a few calculations and suggest other things. I can also go to the FSDO and talk with them and see if they have any ideas. So far no one has suggested an alternative. Hmmm?

 

As for the cone game, not only is it giving me flying time, but helping with my hovering. Whel I lift off the ramp, my hover is too high and I immediately go into forward flight. At least the cones get me closer to the ground and slow the forward movement. Boring may be safe, but where's the entertainment value? At least my IP's aren't doing the same thing over and over. They're keeping me interested in flying, and believe me, I was thinking of quitting after a bad day of flying. These guys make flying fun and I am flying better as a result. Playing with cones has improved my hover. And they are there to get me out of trouble when I get into it. Same with the hover autos. At least I don't skid to the left any more. Do any of you guys have suggestions to hover steady at two feet without moving forward?????

 

This is like that other thread where I was thinking of puttings comms in my motorcycle helmet. No suggestions, just that "Don't do it" mentality.

 

I think the flight characteristics of the machine with camera and mount will be good. It's not a permanent mount, it goes on and off with a screwdriver, and the weight and balance thing should be negligible. Now if ya'll know where I can rent or buy an "Approved" video camera mount, let's hear it.

 

 

By the way,

 

Later.

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Dang guys, kick me in the head why don't ya?

 

They are making an issue out of it for a reason... You might just consider it...

 

The mount is in the thinking stage with the beginnings of a cardboard mockup. The mount will be held with hose clamps on the rear strut and possibly with a few layers of duct tape for good measure. The whole thing will weigh maybe five pounds. I ain't putting a panaflex I-Max camera on it, but rather a small camcorder in the Hi8 format. I was thinking of securing the whole thing from falling off in flight by attaching a 1/8" steel cable around it too. But like I said-thinking stage.

 

Doesn't matter if it is a lipstick camera held on by scotch tape, without a 337 or STC, it is illegal unless it is covered by the aircraft or engine type certificates.

 

Do any of you guys have suggestions to hover steady at two feet without moving forward?????

 

Yes, apply aft pressure on the cyclic when lifting off the ground. If you're still moving forward, you haven't applied enough aft pressure.

 

I think the flight characteristics of the machine with camera and mount will be good.

 

They might well be, so get a 337 signed off and enjoy. That way you're doing things legally, rather than setting yourself up for getting in trouble.

 

Could you get away with it? Sure, odds are you won't get caught. It can end your career if you do get caught, because few operators will hire you with a rules violation on your record. I know I wouldn't.

 

Now if ya'll know where I can rent or buy an "Approved" video camera mount, let's hear it.

 

There are companies that sell such equipment, along with the STCs to go along with it. Movie companies, television and commercial production companies use the stuff all the time.

 

If you're serious about doing it, finding it is only a matter of doing a search for an STC, or making a few phone calls.

 

In any case, you can choose to blow us off as a bunch of old stuffy guys who are trying to take away all your fun, or you can consider that we might, just maybe, know what we're talking about and give it all a second thought.

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Witch,

 

As I said in my earlier posts, 1) I applaud any instructor who is trying to make things fun, 2) I can't really blame the student.

 

No one is kicking you in the head - more your instructors actually.

 

However, I don't know your instructors - they may be way more experienced than I and have weighed up all the risks and decided that they can accept them. If you feel totally safe with them, who am I to say they're wrong?

 

That being said, all I and others are saying is that we would not do this kind of exercise.

 

This is an opinion based on over 1000 hrs of instruction, and many more flying. Its based on personal experiences of how quickly or slowly students can react under pressure; sometimes more quickly than I think I could recover. Its based on having had ground resonance after what seemed to be a pretty mild setdown. Its based on reading the hundreds of accident reports which have occurred during hover practice which ended in a roll.

 

As an instructor, we have to take risks. Even taking off, flying and landing again is a risk when with a new student. In order to do our job we have to take many more risks. We have to let new students do things like autorotations, quick stops, MPTOs, steep approaches and all the other things in the PTS. Fortunately, these risks are made acceptable ones, by having agreed methods of teaching them. I have no need as an instructor to increase my risk exposure any more than I have to. Snagging cones with a wobbly student is un-necessary risk exposure to me, as I know I can achieve the same level of fun and skill in other (more acceptable) ways.

 

On top of that, I also think (and I've said this many times before), that too much emphasis is placed on hovering skills early on. So really I see no need for games like this at this stage. There is better way to use the time which will develop the skills for hovering without the student even realising it.

 

As for the cone game, not only is it giving me flying time, but helping with my hovering. Whel I lift off the ramp, my hover is too high and I immediately go into forward flight.

I really don't want to get into this too much here, you can search for other threads which will contain my philosophies on teaching hovering. However, I will say that these problems can be remedied by 'flying' rather than bimbling around and stressing out low to the ground. Doing approaches and quickstops will sort the hovering out.

 

There are two issues which I will suggest are the root of your hovering problems. They are your spatial awareness based on your processing of visual cues, and concept of gross and fine motor skills development.

 

You can't hope to master fine motor skills before your gross motor skills. That's the bottom line. How can you train to hold a rock-steady hover using just your fingertip and toe muscles if your arm and leg muscles can't put you in approximately the right position in the first place?

 

At this stage I would say you need activities where your visual references and skills required are exaggerated (i.e. in flight and hover taxiing), not minuscule (i.e. in stationary hovering practice and cone games). Your brain needs training to process the visual cues the eyes receive. The visual cues during a pickup stationary hovering and cone games are so subtle that you are not seeing them yet. They are essentially invisible to you. If your brain doesn't even perceive these cues yet, how can it train to use them? Its like giving a blind man a load of maths books to learn from!! Doesn't it make sense that before you attempt to master the subtle visual cues, you should master obvious visual cues?

 

Do a load of approaches and hover taxi skills, and work to get closer to a stationary hover each time. That way you go from large visual references and gross motor skills to increasingly smaller ones (finer motor skills). Eventually, without knowing it you'll have mastered the hover. You'll also have learnt many other things, such as approach angles, winds, RT etc..etc.. I would say student inability to pickup or set down 100% smoothly only becomes an issue after say 10-15 hours. Before that, it really doesn't concern me.

 

As for the camera mounting, well, it did seem from your original post that you had made your decision to go ahead with your project based on the advice from the guys in your hangar.

 

My idea for the mount includes a pin that goes into the mount for the ground wheels and two hose clamps. Should take about 15 minutes to attach and remove. One of the A&P's was telling me that as long as it was not permanent he had no objection. The owner of the school doesn't mind either. I bet he'd want a copy of the tape though.

 

Now this isn't a judgement call. The regulations are there in black and white. So people were simply responding to the information you had given us suggesting that you get a second (official) opinion. It may be that the FSDO are happy with you doing that. Then great. Or it may be that these posts save you from a possible violation. Remember if you are solo and found with an un-airworthy aircraft, it isn't your instructor local A&P or the owner that will cop it even if they told you it was OK. Its you, the PIC who must make sure that the aircraft is airworthy.

 

91.7(B) The pilot in command of a civil aircraft is responsible for determining whether that aircraft is in condition for safe flight. The pilot in command shall discontinue the flight when un-airworthy mechanical, electrical, or structural conditions occur.

 

So far no one has suggested an alternative. Hmmm?

It isn't the design that people are questioning. In fact it sounds pretty good to me...like it would work. No, its the legality of putting it on the aircraft that people are honing in on. And in that respect, I think the posts have been clear....get an opinion from the FSDO.

 

So Witch, don't take this too personally. I think everyone would agree that so far your contribution to this forum, and your enthusiasm for flying, and your confidence to ask questions earns you a great deal of respect.

 

Just remember that as you ask questions and come up with ideas you might get responses that you don't want to hear. Those responses are nothing more than honest opinions - not always right or the best - but at least honest. As Fling said, this is where you become a pilot when you have to start making decisions based on everything you are told and see.

 

Good luck!

 

Joker

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Guest pokey
Dang guys, kick me in the head why don't ya?

 

Now if ya'll know where I can rent or buy an "Approved" video camera mount, let's hear it.

By the way,

 

Later.

 

I surely dont mean to come across in a bad way, Witch,,, but hanging unapproved parts on an aircraft is serious business. I found this for ya, its a start:

 

http://www.airweb.faa.gov/Regulatory_and_G...me?OpenFrameSet

 

do a search on camera mount & you will find many STC's, maybe one will be adaptable to your application. If not? Your next choices are 337 w/ field approval OR experimental airworthiness certificate.

 

1-47 of 47 results for 'camera mount'

 

SR00873AT-D Installation and operation of a Tyler Camera Mount System Nose Camera Mount.

SR00491AT-D Installation and operation of a Tyler Camera mount systems nose camera mount.

SR01714CH Install camera mount on nose of rotorcraft per Helicopters, Inc. Drawing List 90H-470L006, dtd 10/23

SA2-17 Installation of a 17-1/4 inch diameter camera mount ring. Approved for serial number 23-118 ONLY.

SR01486NY Installation of Spacecam RAMS camera mount.

SR01574SE Fabrication of Camera Mount

SS01207LA Installation of Aerial Camera Mount.

SR01119LA Installation of a camera mount system.

SA4-797 Fabrication and installation of camera mount and K-25 camra.

SA252SO Supporting structure for camera mount A-28.

SH58WE Three-view camera mount and Wild RC-8 camera.

SR01058LA Installation of a camera mount system.

SR00851LA Installation of Tyler A-S straight tube camera mount.

SR00643LA Installation of camera mount structure on underside of cabin.

SS00353AT Installation of camera mount adapter plate.

SR00751CH Install nose camera mount.

SH7373SW Installlation of a 'Tyler Mount' camera mounting system.

SR01485NY Installation of Spacecam RAMS camera mount.

SR00133DE Installation of external pod and camera mount.

SH5247NM Installation of external pod, camera mount, and 12 volt power provision.

SH5244NM Installation of external pod and camera mount.

SR02150AT Installation of a Vista Scope camera and camera mount.

SR02430AT Installation of a Front Nose Camera Mount with a PAR AVION Eagle Vision Camera System or other appro

SH3242SO Installation of AERO-CAM camera mount.

SH2510SO Installation of a camera mount and photographer's seat.

SH3241SO Installation of AERO-CAM camera mount.

SH1973SO Installation of camera mount.

SH2506SO Installation of a camera mount and photographer's seat.

SR09083RC Installation of a camera mount, GyroCam camera (no electrical system), and relocation of landing lig

SR00461NY Low Profile Wescam Camera Mount installation.

SR00449NY Installation of CM003A-3D Megamount Camera Mount.

SH938NE Installation of Didec camera mount#DA91 M805 at LH tail rotor attach points.

SR00046DE Installation of external pod and camera mount.

SH5248NM Installation of external pod, camera mount, and 12 volt power provision.

SH5231NM Installation of external pod, camera mount, and 12 volt power provision.

SR01630CH Structural approval only for installation of a camera mount to accept a camera not exceeding 94 lbs.

SR00969LA Installation of a stabilized camera mount in the cabin.

SR01137CH Install FLIR Systems, Inc, Ultramedia RS, U6000, 2000 A/B, 2000 F/V, or 2000G Camera System on EAC H

SH808NE Installation of Aero-Cam camera mount.

SH1244SO Fabrication and installation of camera mount and photographer's seat.

SA4012SW Installation of dual camera port, view finder hole, camera mount for RMKA8.5/23 and RMKA 15/23, inte

SR00883LA Installation of a gyromount camera mount.

SH8696SW Installation of IVAR camera mount, IVAR 500-3 system.

SH8037NM Installation of SkyGyro Camera Mount System to replace lower skid cap.

SR09083RC Installation of a camera mount, GyroCam camera (no electrical system), and relocation of landing lig

SH597NE Installation of Wescom camera mount.

SH596NE Installation of Wescam camera mount.

 

 

STC's are costly & time consuming to get, but? that is another possibility if you cant adapt one of these to your application.

 

Hope this helps & have fun out there and "dont bend the airplane"

 

BTW ? ! I've had this idea for years to mount a video camera on top of the rotor head, pointing at one blade. I bet that blade whips & bends like a wet noodle & anyone who saw it would have 2nd thought about flying in helicopters !

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BTW ? ! I've had this idea for years to mount a video camera on top of the rotor head, pointing at one blade. I bet that blade whips & bends like a wet noodle & anyone who saw it would have 2nd thought about flying in helicopters !

 

Already done...! The blade wobbles around like mad.

 

I have it on my computer, but don't know where it is on the web. If I find it, I'll let you know.

 

Joker

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One other quick point.

 

You say you are having trouble hovering. By doing this kind of exercise you are forcing yourself to look closely at the ground right in close to the aircraft.

 

That's exactly the spot where your eyes should not be looking. You should be looking off in the distance.

 

Fly safe.

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Guest pokey

good point delorean, we used to use those cargo "baskits" for carrying the ground handling wheels ( the ones w/ the handles) :)

 

and another good point vaq------ i remember my instructor years ago telling me to look about 20 feet or so in front of the ship,,,,, where do i look now?----NOT really sure, it just comes natural now B)

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