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Questions from a newbie


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I am starting flight training hopefully this fall. I have a question about restrictions because of eye sight. I wear contacts and have 20/20 vision with them, but I just read that theres and 80% chance that I wont get hired at most places because of my vision. Is this true? Do I have to get Lasik or something just to get a job after I am done with training? I know a lot of helicopter pilots and some of them have glasses and so it never occurred to me that this could be a problem. Anyone have any thoughts?

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My experience is that civilian operators aren't going to care if you require vision correction, as long as you comply with any limitations on your physical. I've worn glasses for 14 years, no- nada, zero, none- employment problems.

 

(You probably won't qualify for flight status in the military, unless you have already.)

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Where did you hear that? It's complete BS. It doesn't matter how bad you vision is, as long as it's correctable, you fine. I think it's 20/40 in one eye and 20/60 in the other corrected. My vision was 20/650 in each eye uncorrected, 20/20 corrected, then I had LASIK and was back flying 5 days later with 20/15.

 

Heart problems, seizures, antidepressants, diabetes, and a few other things will be the only problems keeping you from getting a medical and flying for a living.

 

People are going to tell you all kind of wierd things about the aviation industry.....and they have knowledge of it themselves and should keep their mouth shut about it. Post your questions here, get real answers, and avoid all those idiots that think they know something and want to tell you about it.

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Sec. 67.103

 

Eye.

 

Eye standards for a first-class airman medical certificate are:

(a) Distant visual acuity of 20/20 or better in each eye separately, with or without corrective lenses. If corrective lenses (spectacles or contact lenses) are necessary for 20/20 vision, the person may be eligible only on the condition that corrective lenses are worn while exercising the privileges of an airman certificate.

 

(B) Near vision of 20/40 or better, Snellen equivalent, at 16 inches in each eye separately, with or without corrective lenses. If age 50 or older, near vision of 20/40 or better, Snellen equivalent, at both 16 inches and 32 inches in each eye separately, with or without corrective lenses.

 

© Ability to perceive those colors necessary for the safe performance of airman duties.

 

(d) Normal fields of vision.

 

(e) No acute or chronic pathological condition of either eye or adnexa that interferes with the proper function of an eye, that may reasonably be expected to progress to that degree, or that may reasonably be expected to be aggravated by flying.

 

(f) Bifoveal fixation and vergence-phoria relationship sufficient to prevent a break in fusion under conditions that may reasonably be expected to occur in performing airman duties. Tests for the factors named in this paragraph are not required except for persons found to have more than 1 prism diopter of hyperphoria, 6 prism diopters of esophoria, or 6 prism diopters of exophoria. If any of these values are exceeded, the Federal Air Surgeon may require the person to be examined by a qualified eye specialist to determine if there is bifoveal fixation and an adequate vergence-phoria relationship. However, if otherwise eligible, the person is issued a medical certificate pending the results of the examination.

 

 

Sec. 67.303

 

Eye.

 

Eye standards for a third-class airman medical certificate are:

(a) Distant visual acuity of 20/40 or better in each eye separately, with or without corrective lenses. If corrective lenses (spectacles or contact lenses) are necessary for 20/40 vision, the person may be eligible only on the condition that corrective lenses are worn while exercising the privileges of an airman certificate.

 

(B) Near vision of 20/40 or better, Snellen equivalent, at 16 inches in each eye separately, with or without corrective lenses.

 

© Ability to perceive those colors necessary for the safe performance of airman duties.

 

(d) No acute or chronic pathological condition of either eye or adnexa that interferes with the proper function of an eye, that may reasonably be expected to progress to that degree, or that may reasonably be expected to be aggravated by flying.

 

LASIK for Pilots?

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