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Career Change - Why?


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I've seen several posts discussing career changes to flying. I'm tossing the idea around in my head to change careers and I'm looking for some insight into why people choose flying helicopters. For those of you who left other careers for flying why did you do it?

 

Actually why do any of you fly?

 

Thanks.

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Oh boy, where do I begin.

 

I grew up on Air Force bases and went to many airshows. I guess the flying thing was facinating to me because here's this machine that defies gravity, and I want to pilot that machine. I also saw pilots as almost god-like, these men who controlled the sky.

 

I also followed the space program like a maniac.

 

I was finally able to fly while at Travis A.F.B., and was hooked. They didn't have helos, but I figured I could learn after I got my license. I had this grand idea to fly a Bell 47 to my high school reunion-which we never had, or maybe I wasn't told. Oh well.

 

After the war, flying took a back seat to finding employment and schooling. After the school thing went phart, I got a job that I've had for eight years. The flying bug never went away but rather hibernated. Money is tight when owning a house, and teenage girls ain't no help either.

 

Then that fateful radio advert from Silver State Helicopters. I went to the seminar and found it to be a long winded exercise in concietment. I sent in an application anyway just to see what happens. I get a call to go to an enrollment interview. I go , I get a helo ride in an R-44, and after the ride, the interview.

 

The interview went bad. First, my wife couldn't make it-strike one. Second, he didn't like my airplane background-strike two. Third, he said that he didn't think I was committed to flying-strike three. He did say "At least you got a helicopter ride out of it." I was depressingly bummed out to the max.

 

On the way home, I saw the airport in Albany. Light bulb illuminates.

 

I then found a helo flight school in Corvallis, visited, got a home equity loan, and now I fly.

 

I must admit though, there were a few times I thought of giving up and quitting. Things are different after 15 hours when ones flying is more stable and one can play knocking over traffic cones. My only concerns are the flight instructor thing, the money thing, and the employment thing.

 

After a few hours, I bet you'll find the whole experience as addicting as crack. If not, then it's a good story to tell the grandkids.

 

By the way, I'm 44 and this'll be career change number five, and hopefully the last.

 

Later.

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I've seen several posts discussing career changes to flying. I'm tossing the idea around in my head to change careers and I'm looking for some insight into why people choose flying helicopters. For those of you who left other careers for flying why did you do it?

 

Actually why do any of you fly?

 

Thanks.

 

 

I just fly because I like being broke all the time.

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At about the age of 10 I used to watch Airwolf on TV.

 

Everytime I watched it - even through the opening credits - I would shiver up and down my spine.

 

Difficult to explain - I guess it was the nearest thing to being Luke Skywalker or something. (Star Wars)

 

Programs like Magnum PI or anything with a helicopter - would hypnotize me 100%.

 

(Also the Air Florida 90 Jetranger lake rescue pilot was a hero to me at the time).

 

It all seemed like a pipe dream really - and the sometimes traditional British old fashioned way of not following your dreams (unlike the American way) kicked in for years - listening to family pressure and getting a `proper' job.

 

After working with computers/mainframes for 6 years plus other jobs/travel - I finally planned the escape at the age of 26. A birthday gift of a demo flight in an R22 was the icing on the cake at that point. Writing to flight schools to keep the dream alive for a year whilst finding ways to get the money and make it all happen.

 

At 27 I made the move and went to the States and got my PPL(H) then CPL(H).

 

Never felt more alive really - more so than cars, bikes and women too! ;)

 

It isn't just about flying necessarily. It factors many things for me, flying (and chasing the dream), the lifestyle, scenery/environment/freedom, mutual respect for similar people and a desire to help others grow in a mutually addictive field.

 

The expense is a pain and I decided to work away from flying for 2 years just to pay off debts.

 

After a long break - I'm committed to returning and taking it on professionally.

 

I was 27 when it started. Young enough for me. I respect those of you who are much younger and have the courage or confidence to go for or know what you want at your young ages.

 

Go for a demo flight - see what it's all about.

 

Then follow your heart for sure.

 

My first Instructor was great (3000 hours). I would love to be as good for others as he was for me. That said - he always told me he was feeling ready to quit flying and do fishing full-time or something - so it is all about timing and doing what feels right at the time. A new challenge comes along for different people at different times.

 

All the best either way.

 

(By the way I'm 37 but feel like I'm 25 (on a good day)).

 

$0.02

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I've seen several posts discussing career changes to flying. I'm tossing the idea around in my head to change careers and I'm looking for some insight into why people choose flying helicopters. For those of you who left other careers for flying why did you do it?

 

Actually why do any of you fly?

 

Thanks.

 

Here's a pretty good discussion about the occupation of flying.

 

http://originalforum.justhelicopters.com/D...8921&page=1

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Uncle Sam was training anyone who was willing, and flying was better than crawling & sleeping in the mud. He gave me no other skills, so when I got out I just did what I could. Still doing it. If I had it to do over, I would do something else. Almost anything else. It's fun for awhile, but in the long run it's way over-rated. Fun doesn't put food on the table or shoes on baby's feet. I've missed most of my children's growing up, and couldn't give them stuff their friends got, because there was no money. Now I'm facing retirement, or the loss of my medical, with nothing to fall back on except Social Security and a small 401(k) plan recently started.

 

I wish I had a brighter outlook on this profession, but I just can't find my rose-colored glasses this week.

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Interesting,

 

The more I read about careers the more I realize that I will be flying for fun and not for Profit, I think the dream of flying gives me the drive but I'm working on other business plans so my flying will be for pleasure and not necessity. I already have the house, cars and kids and I won't be taking any jobs in the GOM to get hours. I do think that there are a few dream helicopter jobs out there, you know, close to home, good pay and an employer that cares and I feel if I'm not required to fly to feed my kids I may just find one of those jobs as I can say NO.

I know I'm probably dreaming here but should by business plans prove successful which I feel they will then I will have the luxury of flying when I want to and for the sheer joy of it.

 

Nickels worth

 

Nick

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Flying for fun, and flying for a living, where you have to go to work every day to feed your family, and facing the possibility every day of losing it all because of a health problem which would only be an inconvenience to anyone else, are two entirely different things. I would love to be able to fly for fun, but I can't afford it, not even in a Cessna.

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If I had it to do over, I would do something else. Almost anything else.

 

I think this is the reason most in their late 30's early 40's make the change in their career.

 

No.1 reason: chicks dig it!

 

When your in your 20's....this is why you fly....but after the third date at Taco Bell, they may not "dig" it all that much :blink:

 

 

Uncle Sam was training anyone who was willing, and flying was better than crawling & sleeping in the mud. He gave me no other skills, so when I got out I just did what I could. Still doing it. If I had it to do over, I would do something else. Almost anything else. It's fun for awhile, but in the long run it's way over-rated. Fun doesn't put food on the table or shoes on baby's feet. I've missed most of my children's growing up, and couldn't give them stuff their friends got, because there was no money. Now I'm facing retirement, or the loss of my medical, with nothing to fall back on except Social Security and a small 401(k)

 

After 30+ years of doing anything....it becomes a J*O*B, nasty little word isn't it!!

But I'll bet that on a good day, Gomer still enjoys hitting the start button, hearing the turbines wind up, tuning out the rest of the world, and flying his machine. :)

 

Fly Safe

Clark B)

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When I was reading the paper this weekend I was saddened by a Helicopter crash that killed the 2 pilots while fighting a wild fire here in California. I showed the wife and perhaps that was a mistake as she is not as enthusiastic about my training now. It's not all cake and ice cream out there, the risks go along with the hard work.

 

Nick

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But I'll bet that on a good day, Gomer still enjoys hitting the start button, hearing the turbines wind up, tuning out the rest of the world, and flying his machine.

You can't tune out the world, you have to keep it all in mind to fly successfully. I don't enjoy going to the AME's office every year, knowing this physical could be my last. I don't enjoy undergoing what is essentially an expanded ATP checkride every 6 months, knowing one screwup could mean the end of my job. I didn't enjoy missing more than half of my childrens' childhoods. I didn't enjoy Christmas shopping in a 7-11 on Christmas Eve, because that was the only thing open at 10PM, when I finally got home from offshore because of bad weather. I don't enjoy getting up at 4AM every morning, and going to bed drag-assed tired at 8PM every night. I enjoy flying an ILS to minimums, and finding the runway straight ahead, and I enjoy flying into a rainshower and seeing a complete circle double rainbow, but those don't happen often. Yes, it's become a job, and the job gets less enjoyable as the years go by.

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You can't tune out the world, you have to keep it all in mind to fly successfully. I don't enjoy going to the AME's office every year, knowing this physical could be my last. I don't enjoy undergoing what is essentially an expanded ATP checkride every 6 months, knowing one screwup could mean the end of my job. I didn't enjoy missing more than half of my childrens' childhoods. I didn't enjoy Christmas shopping in a 7-11 on Christmas Eve, because that was the only thing open at 10PM, when I finally got home from offshore because of bad weather. I don't enjoy getting up at 4AM every morning, and going to bed drag-assed tired at 8PM every night. I enjoy flying an ILS to minimums, and finding the runway straight ahead, and I enjoy flying into a rainshower and seeing a complete circle double rainbow, but those don't happen often. Yes, it's become a job, and the job gets less enjoyable as the years go by.

It sounds like you have been doing a "job" you pretty much hate for way too long?.Why not try a career change?.

Safe flying,

Seagull

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