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I've been checking out flight schools on the internet, and I recently watched the hillsboro aviation video. It was very informative, and they mentioned that its easier to get hired by a company if you trained at a flight school with a good reputation(such as hillsboro). Is there any truth to that? Or is it just the hours and experience that counts? Also how important is the weather you train in? I've looked at some of the big schools in florida and arizona, but it seems like flying in oregon with the unpredictable weather would make you better prepared for other jobs down the road maybe? Any info is appreciated. Thanks

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I dont know about flight schools, because I am not a point yet where I can know if my school better prepared me for the real world than another school, but I would think that if you stayed away from the known bad ones, you should be ok. There are a ton of schools out there, some famous (in both positive and negative lights).

 

Go for MAX experience. Arizona.......its hot and dry, always. Weather isn't really a concern.

 

Out in the boon docks, you will get no experience with airspace considerations and flying in "traffic"

 

Oregon you will definately learn weather, same as Washington. I dont know what Hillsboro has for "traffic"

 

I am hoping that I am getting max experience possible for situations in the real world. I am flying within the Mode C veil of a Class B, ( translates into a few miles from a major, international airport) with probably 8 other airports within 25 mile radius (with a few of those also under the Mode C veil as well). I am sure it would be less stressful out in the country side where you saw only the other students at your school, but dealing with continual traffic and continual weather is to my way of thinking, very good training. I at least know that I wont freak out if I ever have to fly into busy airspace out there in the working world, as I trained in that environment.

 

Go for experience gained (weather, airspace, etc) and go for the proper student to CFII ratio. IE, being able to go to school and train whenever you want (on YOUR schedule). If you're about to drop 20, 40, or more THOUSANDS of dollars......find the very best for your time and money. If I am paying this much money, I am going to be able to go fly on my schedule...not waiting in line while 5 other students knock out their hours. I have a career already, my time is worth more than that.

 

Some schools are more popular than others, some are completely unknown, with some notoriously BAD. You're still flying an R22, you are still paying a boatload of money, and you will be doing the same stuff no matter what. Strive for the MOST skill that you can and stay away from the bad ones. This is your training and you should be wanting to be READY for the real world when its all said and done, not saying to yourself you wished you had more weather to deal with, or worrying about what to do in busy airpsace. I'm just a student, but those are my 2 pennies.

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From what I am told by experienced pilots and people that are actually in charge of hiring piltos after training, a lot can be said about what school you attend. Having a school on your resume with a good reputation will definitely help you get hired. There are a ton of good schools out there, and I agree with the last post that if you stay away from the known bad ones, you should not have a problem.

I am training in AZ and cant say enough good things about my school and the training conditions. I am getting high altitude training, have never had to cancel for weather andeveryone at the school wants to see you succeed. They dont seem like some other schools that just push your through to get yoru money and dont really care what kind of pilot you turn out to be. There is traffic at the airport that its based out of, but not an overwhelming amount for a beginner.

Anyhow--thats my thoughts. Its a big decision and you are definitely doing the right thing by asking questions. Keep asking questions cause its the best way to make your decision

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  • 5 months later...

I have to agree with Flygirl. I got my foot in the door at my first interview because the lead pilot recognized the school and knew good pilots came from there since he went there himself (which is a school in Chandler AZ). And I got the job. In my experience, I believe the reputaion of the school plays a big part in catching a potential employers eye. That's all I know.

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I have to agree with Flygirl. I got my foot in the door at my first interview because the lead pilot recognized the school and knew good pilots came from there since he went there himself (which is a school in Chandler AZ). And I got the job. In my experience, I believe the reputaion of the school plays a big part in catching a potential employers eye. That's all I know.

 

What is the best way to determine if a school is reputabile or not? Any suggestions? How important is high altitude training versus sea level? I am trying to figure out where to go to school and I am not limited by location. I will go anywhere. I was hoping to be in the north east by more family, but I live in Utah and have heard I should stay because of the benefit of the high altitude.

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Well Oregon is a great place to learn how to fly, I did my helicopter transition back in 1982-83. As For reputation, that is a subjective thing one persons great place is anothers don't touch them with a 10 foot pole. Look at how well they are organized and how clean the hangers and aircraft are along with class rooms and what the general shape of things are. New and flash is not what you should look for, a track record of turning out good pilots is. It could be one of the big schools like HAI or it could be a guy in an out of the way place, with a Bell 47 G-2 or Hiller 12 c. and has been flying helicopters since the Korean War. Above all shop around. In the end what you want is good solid training.

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What is the best way to determine if a school is reputabile or not? Any suggestions? How important is high altitude training versus sea level? I am trying to figure out where to go to school and I am not limited by location. I will go anywhere. I was hoping to be in the north east by more family, but I live in Utah and have heard I should stay because of the benefit of the high altitude.

 

I think high altitude training is beneficial due to the fact that it teaches you how to be conscientious about the power you have available in the helicopter. I think Upper Limit is a pretty reputable school. I'm sure there are a lot more reasons why flying in a high altitude environment would be beneficial.

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For sure attending a school that the person hiring you has heard of or has hired people from and been happy with is a great help. BUT when you go to interview how you act, your attitude and your flying skills mean much much more. I have had friends from the school I trained at (Universal in Provo) get hired and asked for other names of people who might want a job, and I have other friends who worked at Silver State and got jobs with out any difficulties. And at this stage I would say Silver State does have a bit of a bad rap. I am not here to judge schools and sometimes wonder at the people who have made it their life's mission to rag on a school. I understand that not everyone has a great experience at the school they attended and they want to get the word out so I guess it works either way. I would encourage anyone who is researching a school to ask for names and phone numbers of current students and give them a call to get the real scoop on the school. Any reputable school should be okay with that. Also location does help with your training. The Northwest is great for flying in less than great weather, But how much does that slow you down and cost you more. AZ and Florida both have great weather and access to Bravo or Charlie airspace which helps understand the ATC system, but they aren't really high altitude ( unless you are in Prescott). Colorado and Utah both have Okay Weather in Summer and bad weather in winter but they have the advantage of Very Large mountains very close. However R22's are close to the limit of what they can do at these altitudes. Not too sure about the north east or the mid west but I would guess there are good schools out there. Hope this helps a bit, just remember at the end of the day you do the flying not your school and the chief pilots know that, thats why they interview you not the school for a job.

 

Fly Safe

BEN

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