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Hello everyone, I ma taking my 135 check ride next week. Soon after that I would like to start working on my ATP. Could any one give me an idea of how their ATP check ride was? Oral and flight portions. Also, does the 500 hour X-C requirement have be done at or more that 25nm or can it be as stated in part 1 where as long as I use radio nav, dead recon, pilotage I can log the flight as an X-C. Thank you! Have a great day!

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The oral is on the aircraft. Know it inside and out. Be able to describe in detail every system - powerplant, drivetrain, landing gear, fuel, electrical, hydraulics, - everything. Know how to use every performance chart, and know all the limitations.

 

The flight portion is standard, described in the PTS. You fly 2 precision and 2 non-precision approaches, one single-engine if a multi-engine aircraft is used. Holding, course interception, etc - everything in the PTS.

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Hello everyone, I ma taking my 135 check ride next week. Soon after that I would like to start working on my ATP. Could any one give me an idea of how their ATP check ride was? Oral and flight portions. Also, does the 500 hour X-C requirement have be done at or more that 25nm or can it be as stated in part 1 where as long as I use radio nav, dead recon, pilotage I can log the flight as an X-C. Thank you! Have a great day!

 

This is from f/w, but the Part 1 worked forthe x/c requirement for the 135, but the 50 (f/w--25 as you stated) nm applied to the ATP. I believe it can be a POINT (no landing) that is 50/25 nm away,too.

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This is from f/w, but the Part 1 worked forthe x/c requirement for the 135, but the 50 (f/w--25 as you stated) nm applied to the ATP. I believe it can be a POINT (no landing) that is 50/25 nm away,too.

 

Thank you guys for the info! It'll be a bit before I am able to take my check ride but wanted to get a jump on things. It seems to be pretty much what I thought.

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(v) For the purpose of meeting the aeronautical experience requirements for any pilot certificate with a rotorcraft category rating or an instrument-helicopter rating, or for the purpose of exercising recreational pilot privileges, in a rotorcraft, under §61.101©, time acquired during a flight—

 

(A) Conducted in an appropriate aircraft;

 

( B ) That includes a point of landing that was at least a straight-line distance of more than 25 nautical miles from the original point of departure; and

 

( C ) That involves the use of dead reckoning, pilotage, electronic navigation aids, radio aids, or other navigation systems to navigate to the landing point.

 

I know of people that have gotten it without the required cross country, but I think it was an oversight on the examiner. To a certain extent, what you put in your logbook may not be questioned, as I can see an examiner not wanting to verify 500 hours of flying. Now if the logbook ever needs to be verified, it might be an issue.

Edited by C of G
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