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Checkride Nerves


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So I'm finished with all my req's at about 50 hours and am nearing my checkride for PPL. My maneuvers are OK, but my autos need work for confidence, especially 180's.

 

When do you know you're ready for a checkride. I've heard the phrase, 'trust your CFI, he won't send you if you're not ready'. However, my CFI just left for the Gulf and I'm finishing with another CFI I haven't really flown with much.

 

I'm stuck between wanting to finish quickly and start logging PIC time, but can't practice the advanced maneuvers just doing solos before my checkride.

 

How did you know you were ready for the checkride? Any checkride horror stories that I should know to avoid pitfalls?

 

Thanks

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"I'm stuck between wanting to finish quickly and start logging PIC time, but can't practice the advanced maneuvers just doing solos before my checkride."

 

you probably won't be allowed to do auto's once you have your license anyway. If you fly the schools aircraft. In fact many schools don't allow off airport landings as well unless your with a CFI.

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"I'm stuck between wanting to finish quickly and start logging PIC time, but can't practice the advanced maneuvers just doing solos before my checkride."

 

you probably won't be allowed to do auto's once you have your license anyway. If you fly the schools aircraft. In fact many schools don't allow off airport landings as well unless your with a CFI.

 

 

I have a different view. WORK THE AUTOS!!

 

In the real world, every auto you might encounter will be a different circumstance. But in training, they are all the same ! Level flight, 500AGL, 65 KIAS, runway approaching, etc.....so there is no reason why you can't bang them out perfectly every time!

 

I don't think there is a better reason to fail the practical than if you do poor autos....so forget the solo stuff, go out with a CFI and practice them until you really feel good about it. Don't let the CFI do the entry and you just "hang on"...its not real enough...you need to take control and do the auto 100%.....cause thats the way the check ride will be. 180's are important...and not really that tough to master...just remember to not use the pedals...but I never had to do a 180 for my private, I'm not sure but I don't think its in the private test anymore..

 

Good luck on your testing....

 

Goldy

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First of all, if you've made it this far you're more than capable of passing the checkride.

Don't get in a tizzy-

No examiner is out to bust you-

He'd rather see you pass with flying colors and most of them will help you do just that.

Remember to take your time, there is no rush on a check ride.

Talk to him while your flying, let him know what your planning, where your going , why your turning, etc.

Don't forget calling a go around is considered good judgement and you are required to call at least one.

If an auto doesn't feel right call a go around.

Sure at some point he's going to roll the power off on you and probably pull a circuit breaker on you, but he's not going to put you or himself in a dangerous situation. Not if he's in his right mind.

My check ride turned out to be very enjoyable.

The examiner turned out to be a lot of fun to fly with.

Don't get me wrong, I was nervous as a whore in church all morning.

But by the time I got thru the verbal exam everything was cool.

Examiners know it is a tense time for you.

They generaly shoot the bull for a while to put you at ease and lead you thru the verbal.

I didn't do everything perfect on the checkride- Does anybody? I doubt it.

He had me do a couple of things twice-

 

There will come a time when you want to get the check ride done, out of the way.

You'll still be a nervous son of a gun-

No big deal, join the club, we all been there.

 

Good luck and most of all, have fun.

gft

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I think qft said it right. My PPL checkride was one of the easiest things i did in training. My DPE gave me a scenario we talked through it. Litteraly that is what u do. We went out i preflighted then he asked some more questions we flew did a pinacle, run on, 180 and a quick stop without a hitch.

Thinking about what i was going to do telling him. then doing it was natural and fun to no end.

 

PS: I can't wait for my commercial checkride hopefully i can go with the same examiner.

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Goldy that was kind of my point. you need to be autoing your ass off. I was just warning him that if he continues onward at the same school he might not be able to practice emergency procedures solo even with his private. You should use your CFI as much as you can while you have him/her, besides its your "in command" time anyway. Thats all i was saying, its not complete freedom after your private unless you own a bird.

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Thanks for all the advice...it really helps.

 

As far as practicing the advanced maneuvers solo, I was refering to Shallow App. RO landings, running TO's, slopes, quickstops, etc... My school has the same policy of no autos without a CFI when you rent. Scheduled to fly and hopefully nail my autos in a lesson or two.

 

I have the ASA book for Oral Exam ?'s and PPL Practical Test Standards. Should I expect to perform all the maneuvers listed, or will the examiner just pick 1/2 and ask me to do them. If I screw up a maneuver, do I get a second chance on a go-around? If you fail a maneuver, do you keep going with the exam and fix it later or do you end the flight and come back in?

 

Thanks again.

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From a member on VM on the very same subject

 

Show up early.

 

Be dressed for the conditon of the day/enviroment.

 

Be curdious and personable.

 

Thank him for the opportunity. (before the ride / interview)

 

Display a willingness to listen.

 

Know the FM for type...WELL!

 

Answer questions honestly, saying "I do not know" is not a bad thing.

 

Fly to the best of your ability.....same as you did with your instructor. (good night rests helps here as you know)

 

Thank him after the ride and interview, wether you get it or not!!!!!

 

ATITUDE wins most time.

 

and most importantly, enjoy it!

 

(dam I sound like a old woman)

 

______________________________________________________

some more good advise from north of the border

 

All real good points

 

Also try to find out some info on the airport / heliport for traffic patterns and radio frequencies - nothing like taking off into wind by darting across the active fixed wing runway without looking either right or left to wake up the check pilot- of course the check pilot should brief you on this but it is best to stay alert.

 

If the check pilot is doing more than one ride or is taking two of you up at once with a seat change mid-flight ask to ride along or try to sit in the back and fly second then listen and watch to learn what the check pilot is expecting - learn from the mistakes of others.

 

Be sure to take off the tiedown and fasten your seat belt - I'm not joking - I had one guy forget both. I think the tie down gaff made him so nervous that it lead to the seatbelt problem - I aborted the ride and we went and had a coffee then started again - he did a lot better on the second attempt. People do weird stuff on assessment rides - nerves and the fact they may not have flown for a while can do that.

 

Do not do anything you think is not safe or beyond your abilities. There is a fine line here but err on the side of caution.

 

In the air, when given a task explain briefly, repeat briefly, what you are doing but then shutup and concentrate on the flying.

 

Keep in mind you not only have to land in the confined area but have to take off too so plan your departure on you recce. I only say this as I have seen some interesting departures on these type of rides caused by a good approach followed by a take off towards an obstacle 5 or 600 feet from the confined area.

 

I used to have a set ride that I would brief and have all candidates fly. While not designed to screw the person up or overload them it had some interesting stuff to show whether the person had situational awareness. The ride took about 30 minutes but some were much, much shorter. One fellow never did find the airport again. even when it was directly below him.

 

Oh yeah you won't make any points by dicussing your expected high salary and the fact you don't do tent camps or a tour over 4 weeks! Trust me it happened - I refered him to Air Canada.

 

Don't show up with your girl / boy friend in tow so she / he can "come along for the ride."

 

Some very strange people show up that do not in any way resemble the resume or the person you had that great phone conversation with.

 

Having said all that - relax and enjoy.

Edited by 67november
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Bring cash along to pay your DPE. They don’t like checks or credit cards. ;)

 

RDW

 

Or you can have the school take it out of the loan like they did for me and the other students. I highly do not recommend this because while they are paying the dpe, they are taking money for themselves, out of your loan. Before you get your cfii the money is all gone. Actually the first loan is gone right when you are scheduled to get your comm. Also the dpe for the pri and the comm is the pres of the school. He has control over everything, which is not good for the students.

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So I'm finished with all my req's at about 50 hours and am nearing my checkride for PPL. My maneuvers are OK, but my autos need work for confidence, especially 180's.

 

When do you know you're ready for a checkride. I've heard the phrase, 'trust your CFI, he won't send you if you're not ready'. However, my CFI just left for the Gulf and I'm finishing with another CFI I haven't really flown with much.

 

I'm stuck between wanting to finish quickly and start logging PIC time, but can't practice the advanced maneuvers just doing solos before my checkride.

 

How did you know you were ready for the checkride? Any checkride horror stories that I should know to avoid pitfalls?

 

Thanks

 

Hi Fallguy,

 

I had the same situation only i had more instructors than you, The disadvantage is that they first wanne see what your level is. They all have got an different ways of teaching autorotations and quickstop.

 

I hope you can go up quickly for your checkride and put deadlines for you checkride.

 

benny

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