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R22 & R44 Safety Review


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I have to agree that the POH is hardly used real life except when studying. It isn't always the handiest thing to just pull out and then stow each time you just need a little reminder, that is probably why they make preflight checklists and startup/shutdown checklists, if the POH were that handy, why not just use that for those processes? I am always thinking of making my own little laminated checklists for everything. I think these are a great idea, and hardly think they are over-priced. Maybe if these are successful they will be made for more types of helicopters ;) I would personally be selling them on Ebay also...

 

Dave

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Hmmm,

 

Personally, I think the Emergency section of the R22 (and S300) POH should be committed to memory. At least that's how it was for me and my students. The pilot must be able to reel off words to similar effect as the POH from memory on any of the items.

 

The R22 is such a simple aircraft that there is not a lot that can go wrong. Of the problems you will have (i.e those in the emergency section) most of them are items which require 'immediate' action. Others are simply 'common sense' items which should be rote.

 

In fact as I read through my R22 POH, (with the exception of the 'warning lights' parts) I can't find any of the listed emergencies where you have time to whip out a checklist to save your skin or where you need to whip out a checklist to troubleshoot a problem.

 

This is in stark contrast to a say, a multi-engine dual-crew aircraft, where the systems are complex and many. In this sort of aircraft, only a relatively few emergencies (compared to the total number) are ones which require immediate or 'rote' responses.

 

In fact the number of 'Memory Items' for an aircraft such as this is probably less than found in the POH for the R22. Actually, comparing the S76 POH and R22 POH, the memory items are generally the same ones - engine fire, tail rotor failure, etc etc.... The main bulk of the S76 emergency checklist items are complex procedures for identifiying and troubleshooting the systems.

 

So the 'R22' laminated Emergency Checklist is a good idea for learning or even as a refresher when you are not in the air. (Possibly kept in the car!). It seems an expensive peice of kit to buy though, when you could easily cut and paste the POH one into Word and make one yourself.

 

On the other hand, the passenger briefing is a good idea. I made a similar one for myself and laminated it. Whenever I had a checkride, I'd bring my one out to brief the examiner. On more than one occassion the examiner would cut me short upon seeing that I was using a solid format for my briefing and was therefore unlikely to miss out the important things he wanted to hear. It made things very useful (although I haven't used it since my flight training!)

 

Joker

Edited by joker
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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 4 weeks later...
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  • 2 weeks later...

Of course. One is required to memorize these procedures to pass the checkride for a rating. Six months later the memory fades if not practiced and studied. The point of the review is to refresh the memory during warm-up or pre-flight...just in case. Our research and the FAA says that pilots rarely open the POH unless studying for a rating or installing equipment that would alter the W+B of an aircraft. We have gotten some very positive feedback both from the FAAST team as well as some of our customers..

 

Richard

 

http://heli-safety.com

031003121845020.jpg

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  • 4 months later...
Hmmm,

 

Personally, I think the Emergency section of the R22 (and S300) POH should be committed to memory. At least that's how it was for me and my students. The pilot must be able to reel off words to similar effect as the POH from memory on any of the items.

 

The R22 is such a simple aircraft that there is not a lot that can go wrong. Of the problems you will have (i.e those in the emergency section) most of them are items which require 'immediate' action. Others are simply 'common sense' items which should be rote.

 

In fact as I read through my R22 POH, (with the exception of the 'warning lights' parts) I can't find any of the listed emergencies where you have time to whip out a checklist to save your skin or where you need to whip out a checklist to troubleshoot a problem.

 

This is in stark contrast to a say, a multi-engine dual-crew aircraft, where the systems are complex and many. In this sort of aircraft, only a relatively few emergencies (compared to the total number) are ones which require immediate or 'rote' responses.

 

In fact the number of 'Memory Items' for an aircraft such as this is probably less than found in the POH for the R22. Actually, comparing the S76 POH and R22 POH, the memory items are generally the same ones - engine fire, tail rotor failure, etc etc.... The main bulk of the S76 emergency checklist items are complex procedures for identifiying and troubleshooting the systems.

 

So the 'R22' laminated Emergency Checklist is a good idea for learning or even as a refresher when you are not in the air. (Possibly kept in the car!). It seems an expensive peice of kit to buy though, when you could easily cut and paste the POH one into Word and make one yourself.

 

On the other hand, the passenger briefing is a good idea. I made a similar one for myself and laminated it. Whenever I had a checkride, I'd bring my one out to brief the examiner. On more than one occassion the examiner would cut me short upon seeing that I was using a solid format for my briefing and was therefore unlikely to miss out the important things he wanted to hear. It made things very useful (although I haven't used it since my flight training!)

 

Joker

 

 

 

 

 

J- Thanks for mentioning that - They are not meant to be a checklist. They are meant to be used during flight planning or run-up as a refresher. We just got a great write-up in Vertical magazine about just that point. We will have a 300/300CBI version out soon. (working on it)

 

Richard

 

http://heli-safety.com

 

http://heli-wear.comCAP_BELL_BY.JPG

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  • 4 weeks later...

helipcheli, which hospital room are you in? Are they addressing the mental health issues? Try and get some professional help with the latent issues you've been covering up. Also, I'd be careful about online slander, you might not know who you're dealing with.

 

Worldcrime

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