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Terminology Cheat Sheet


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I sure don't but that would make a GREAT thread for students!

 

 

well.. why don't you start one.

 

Talk about:

 

ATIS

VFR

IFR

IMC

VNE

VOR

DME

FL

AGL

DA

 

Hmmm..why does this sound so familiar??

Edited by Goldy
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I'll Start with the "A" section first lol! But in all seriousness, in the back of the rotorcraft handbook (one of my favorites) most of these are listed for reference. But there are some that are missing or the definitions are a little too basic or complex.

 

AGL: Above Ground Level (In reference to elevation)

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Funny, I've been thinking about writing one for my students, since this is a fairly common lunchtime topic. Usually it will start with somebody asking "what is *insert acronym here.*" Then it turns into a game of stump the instructors, with the students trying to find an acronym that will stump one, or all of us. It is a great learning tool, and sometimes they actually stump us.

 

GPS

GNSS

RNAV

TCAS

TAWS

EFIS

FADEC

LNAV

VNAV

INS

LORAN

MSL

VHF

UHF

HF

RF

MLS

 

And the list goes on...

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There is a glossary in the back of the AIM with all this stuff.....funny how 90% of the stuff people want cheat sheets for is readily available in the reference materials. Not picking on you, I was the same way until I started to realize the resources that I didn't even know I had were right under my nose.

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The point of a cheat sheet is to not have to find it in the AIM or other books. It's a quick reference...

 

I guess I thought opening up the AIM to the Glossary tab was quick. I see your point, but by the time you made a cheat sheet for every reference it would be just as hard to find what you needed among your cheat sheets. Maybe a better cheat sheet would be one that had a list of page numbers/books for different topics. It is my understanding that the DPEs want to see the ability to find references in the approved FAA materials, too many cheat sheets might diminish those skills.

 

Just my 2 cents, everyone has different study methods.

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I agree with Tenacious, know where it is in the references. The references are subject to change and always knowing where to find the information means that you will always be able to access up-to-date information.

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I know where it all is in the reference material. As another person mentioned, for training purposes, its handy to have it all in the same place.

 

I was talking about aerodynamics and other terminology as well not the regularly used stuff.

 

I agree with Tenacious, know where it is in the references. The references are subject to change and always knowing where to find the information means that you will always be able to access up-to-date information.
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I guess I thought opening up the AIM to the Glossary tab was quick. I see your point, but by the time you made a cheat sheet for every reference it would be just as hard to find what you needed among your cheat sheets. Maybe a better cheat sheet would be one that had a list of page numbers/books for different topics. It is my understanding that the DPEs want to see the ability to find references in the approved FAA materials, too many cheat sheets might diminish those skills.

 

Just my 2 cents, everyone has different study methods.

 

Very true, DPEs do want to see the ability to find references, but how often does the definition of GPS or VFR change? The real question is how many cheat sheets are too many? And what cheat sheets do you give students. My answer: Give cheat sheet for commonly referenced information that rarely changes, and for which rote memorization is only needed, i.e. GPS, VFR, IFR, etc. Teach your students how to find information, but the stuff that only needs to be memorized can go on a cheat sheet. A good example of this is a cheat sheet with limitations and general information about the helicopter. How often will the max gross weight change after all?

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Exactly. Thats what I'm talking about, a learning aide for terms not used outside of aviation or in some cases rarely used outside of rotorcraft. Not for terms that will change frequently or likely at all. Relative wind isn't going to be redefined, nor swash plate, etc. :).

 

Aerodynamics related terms being the hardest to remember in general, at least for me. I've already started my own document for me. I honestly figure someone would chime in and upload something, but it's not that hard to type and copy/paste from the 'net.

 

Thanks.

 

Very true, DPEs do want to see the ability to find references, but how often does the definition of GPS or VFR change? The real question is how many cheat sheets are too many? And what cheat sheets do you give students. My answer: Give cheat sheet for commonly referenced information that rarely changes, and for which rote memorization is only needed, i.e. GPS, VFR, IFR, etc. Teach your students how to find information, but the stuff that only needs to be memorized can go on a cheat sheet. A good example of this is a cheat sheet with limitations and general information about the helicopter. How often will the max gross weight change after all?
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IFR- I Follow Roads.

 

Sorry, I remember that one from my airplane days.

 

Later

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Teach your students how to find information, but the stuff that only needs to be memorized can go on a cheat sheet. A good example of this is a cheat sheet with limitations and general information about the helicopter. How often will the max gross weight change after all?

 

Good idea, you got me thinking. A good cheat sheet would be one with info from the POH (as long as you include what section it came from) such as normal ranges and red lines for gauges, min/max oil temp/pressure, fuel capacity, min/max GW, required equipment, drive system RPMs etc. I guess whatever study method that works for you is a good one as long as you don't under value the ability to quickly find something in the appropriate reference material (especially the FAR-use tabs!!).

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I know where it all is in the reference material. As another person mentioned, for training purposes, its handy to have it all in the same place.

 

I was talking about aerodynamics and other terminology as well not the regularly used stuff.

Last I checked, the RFH had a glossary that included aerodynamics. I never had a Cheat Sheet, but I was always asked to diagram certain things to demonstrate that I had an understanding of certain aerodynamics. I remember that my Instructor always had me drawing on the backs of envelopes (he said that he used to have paper but everyone would take stuff from his desk); the difference between Hover IGE and OGE, transverse flow, dissymmetry of lift, induced flow, etc..
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