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Situational Awareness


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The first one could have been avoided by just having a painted square to land and take off from...$5 bucks worth of paint vs a 350,000.00 aircraft...hmmm..probably not worth the time.

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old vid but still entertaining, just glad everyone was ok.

 

As a curiosity, here in oz when ground marshaling or being crew chief you are supposed to check and shout clear if it is ok for the pilot to lift off - how does being under the door count as clear?? :huh:

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Haven't seen the first one before. Daayum! Good tip, and glad everyone was OK.

 

On the second clip, I read somewhere on the net that the passenger riding left seat, hit the cyclic exiting the aircraft WAY TOO SOON. Didn't listen to the pilot. The stick did a darn good job saving that one, IMHO. Never under-estimate the power of stupidity.

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One of the perils of hovering so %$#*& high. Lots of things will hurt you trying to hover way up there. A standard 3-ft hover will save your a$$ more often than not. There's a reason it's standard. Lots of reasons, actually.

 

Why is a 3 foot hover safer then a 6 foot hover?

 

RW

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Why is a 3 foot hover safer then a 6 foot hover?

 

RW

 

 

If you had a total engine or tail rotor failure while hovering you will be on the ground in one form or another in about one second. Would you like to fall from 2 feet or from 10 feet?

 

2 feet doesnt even scratch the skids...from the video you can see what 10 feet feels like.

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Gomer, it wasn't his tail rotor, it was his main. See how the machine was pushed back and down. If it was a tail, he would have spun first. The gouge on the door would have looked different, too. It was ripped from the side, not buzzed from underneath.

 

And ask Frank Robinson if he prefers pilots to hover at 6 feet or 3 feet. He will tell you that there has never been an R22 crashed because they hovered too high and had an engine failure, but the books are full of aircraft which dug a skid into the ground and rolled up because of hovering too low.

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I've never talked to Mr. Robinson, but I'm not sure he would say that. Surely the Robbies have a height-velocity diagram, and surely it has a maximum safe hover height. If you hover inside that area, then you are guaranteed to bend metal if the engine fails. If you are outside it, then you should be able to do a successful autorotation, provided you're reasonably competent as a pilot. Hovering too high will always result in an accident if the engine fails. Of course students have dug a skid and rolled up, almost always when moving backwards, and usually when trying to land from a hover. Hovering at the proper height is an essential skill, and should be taught by an experienced instructor. That isn't always the case. I still believe that hovering at a skid height of 3 feet is the safest, and it makes me cringe when I see someone hovering at 10 or 20 feet when there is no reason to do so.

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Gomer, it wasn't his tail rotor, it was his main. See how the machine was pushed back and down. If it was a tail, he would have spun first. The gouge on the door would have looked different, too. It was ripped from the side, not buzzed from underneath.

 

And ask Frank Robinson if he prefers pilots to hover at 6 feet or 3 feet. He will tell you that there has never been an R22 crashed because they hovered too high and had an engine failure, but the books are full of aircraft which dug a skid into the ground and rolled up because of hovering too low.

 

 

Eric- you are absolutely correct. Frank teaches a 5 foot hover to keep from snagging a skid...due to the fact that you have student pilots hovering the thing....the extra margin of safety compared to the minimal risk of engine failure is worth it. However, once you learn to fly the damn thing, I feel much safer at 2-3 feet...cause I have figured out what that collective stick thingy actually does! So, like anything I think a lot has to do with where you are in the learning curve. I still have a lot to learn, but I think I have hovering pretty down pat. Now in wind or gusty conditions, I will hover higher because the 22 is such a light bird even a 7 or 8 knot gust will surprise you.

 

Goldy

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