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200hrs or 300hrs needed to instruct


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Ok, I'm seeing post about some insurance companies requiring 300 hrs to be able to instruct. Does that mean I should save an extra $20,000 so I can pay to fly myself around for an extra 100 hrs after the initial 200hrs? I plan to pay for training out pocket and I hate to be caught unemployable because I need another 100hrs to instruct and then not have any more money. Yes, I suppose I could fly for boat pix or something but nothing is guranteed so I'm trying to plan in advance. Although, I could take one heck of a cross country trip for $20,000. Hmm, $20,000 is 4 months extra of work :unsure:

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Ok, I'm seeing post about some insurance companies requiring 300 hrs to be able to instruct. Does that mean I should save an extra $20,000 so I can pay to fly myself around for an extra 100 hrs after the initial 200hrs? I plan to pay for training out pocket and I hate to be caught unemployable because I need another 100hrs to instruct and then not have any more money. Yes, I suppose I could fly for boat pix or something but nothing is guranteed so I'm trying to plan in advance. Although, I could take one heck of a cross country trip for $20,000. Hmm, $20,000 is 4 months extra of work :unsure:

 

I asked the same at some of the schools that I visited, and have some idea of what is going on (but can't speak with any authority). The 300 hours is an insurance requirement, so it depends who the school has the policy with (or possibly who they lease their heli's from). The instructor I asked at Classic (Seattle), which falls under the 300-hr rule, said that if they see a student they want as a CFI later, they find ways to train them up to the 300-hour mark. The specifics weren't clear (and I don't mean in a shady way--I didn't ask much more), but I think it involved working with another instructor or the chief pilot. Several schools have given the answer that it (the 300-hr requirement) isn't a problem because they "own our own birds" (I think Northwest in Seattle was one of them, but don't quote me--heligirl would be the one to ask), so they have no issue hiring 200-hour pilots. At one school, I did see a

 

It's a good question--I'm starting part-time training end of the month, and am going to ask again a few times.

 

good luck--and I hope you get better answers.

--chris

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There are two frequent ways around the 200hr vs 300hr problem, at least as far as I've discerned. One, is as kodoz mentions. If they want you, they'll find a way. Of course this is most likely in the case of you being hired by your own school. I think it's unlikely they would go to the trouble for a relative stranger unless you have some other particularly desirable qualification(s). The other way is for a school to have one aircraft that is insured by other than Pathfinder (or uninsured I suppose), since Pathfinder is the culprit as far as the 300hr minimum goes (I believe they are the most cost-effective provider, which explains their prevalence in the industry). You would teach only in that aircraft until you reach the 300hr mark. That's the info I've picked up on. Hope it provides some insight, if it doesn't exactly HELP... :ph34r:

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Some schools - if they really dig your personality and skills and CFI/I/professional ambition - will help by getting an insurance rider (might be other than Pathfinder) for those 100 hours. Once you've met the minima, you are covered on the regular ops insurance. GOOD & timely question.

 

-WATCH FOR THE WIRES-

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Another good reason to get some Schweizer 300 time in addition to R-22 time... The Schweizer 300 has no such issues, and is a heck of a lot of fun to fly. :)

 

Yes, some schools do require 300 hours to teach because they use Pathfinder for their insurance carrier. Other schools use AIG or US Speciality, they have lower requirements...

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The school I'm attending allows you to instruct instrument from 200 to 300 hrs, and they also allow you to sit in on some solo commercial X-Countrys as the commercial students don't need all the solo hours that is allocated in the course to be eligable for the commercial check ride.

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The school I'm attending allows you to instruct instrument from 200 to 300 hrs, and they also allow you to sit in on some solo commercial X-Countrys as the commercial students don't need all the solo hours that is allocated in the course to be eligable for the commercial check ride.

 

 

I was thinking more about this again and here is something that I thought of. Schools will almost have to find someway to help with the extra hours because how many students can afford to fly an extra 100hrs on top of the 200hrs so they can become instructors. That could create a shortage of instructors. I think my best bet is to save up for the extra 100hrs and just hope I don't need to spend it. So that way I have nothing to worry about as far as that goes.

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