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Getting ready to start CFI


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alright, fixing to start my CFI, lookin for all pointers, help, or heads up's i can get.... i found a book CFI lesson plans anyone tried it?

 

I've heard bad things and good things, there's a thread about it on the forum VertRef Lesson Plan Thread. I borrowed lesson plans from a few CFIs and meshed it with my own thinking to creat mine, I'm not done yet and still haven't started the training, but they look decent :rolleyes: You going to be doing that rating in the Hiller or Enstrom?

Edited by svtcobra66
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im going to go ahead and knock it out in the enstrom's since im familiar with it and then maybe back to the hiller's. what is the best way to start studying or what books did you guys start studying with?

Edited by clay
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  • 3 weeks later...
im going to go ahead and knock it out in the enstrom's since im familiar with it and then maybe back to the hiller's. what is the best way to start studying or what books did you guys start studying with?

 

Basically anything that I could get my hands on. Most examiners like to see some sort of Instructor guide. Mine was 3 inches thick when done. Used the PTS as the basis of the guide. I wrote lesson plans for each manner in the PTS. Used photos and drawing to illustrate the maneuvers and key points. Some of the best advice I got before the training was that this checkride is mostly talking. Be such a fountain of information that the examiner tells you to shut-up. Be factual and exact. Humor is always welcome, as it usually makes for better learning.

 

good luck.

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I just took my CFI ride on the 2nd so I'll share some of the insights of the examiner. I don't have my notebook with me, so this is just from memory.

 

1) Have a lesson plan for everything you might teach. I had lesson plans for everything in the PTS, but didn't have a plan for teaching ADM or SFAR 73 (robbie) for example. I was approaching the ride as "master everything in this PTS", which in hindsight was blindingly obviously wrong. Go beyond not only in knowledge but in preparation. When you're done and have you ticket, you CAN walk right out and teach. Make sure you have the tools to do just that.

 

2) Generate a syllabus summary. Another one I didn't even think of before the ride. Just a list of all the lessons and their order, with an area to write down the estimated hours and completion date. Also add an endorsement checklist for the specific rating. This gives you and your student an easy way to look and see what's left, what to study next, and ensures you cover everything. Where it would have helped me is when i was asked "how are you going to teach commercial compared to private?" I could have just whipped out the two summaries and said "bam! here are the lessons for each etc etc." Instead I flipped through the pages of my syllabuses (syllabi?) and kinda tripped over myself a bit.

 

3) Have everything printed or marked. Mark every inspection in the maint log for the aircraft to prove airworthyness. Have a list of all AD's and know which ones apply to your aircraft. Teach this to your students. Example: AD 88-26-01 R2 for the R22, MR spindle inspection.

 

4) When it's time to take control, take control. I did ok on this front, but make sure that when things are going bad on the flight, take the controls and leave no doubt who's in control. My examiner was going to try to fly us into a confined at 45kts, I recognized it early, offered advice to fix it, but when I saw no response it was time to go around.

 

That's all I can remember without my notes. Of course this is just from my ride, not all my training. Some stuff is pretty standard: Be a fountain of knowledge, never stop talking, say what you want (forward cyclic) not "Nose down". Also, learn to be confident saying "i don't know, but I will find out for you."

 

As for the writing of lesson plans, I wrote most of mine from scratch. I looked at a lot of other plans for format and content. They are in a constant state of change, I've re-written 3 since checkride alone.

 

For those that do care, I did pass my ride. Better feeling that my first solo, far greater sense of accomplishment for me personally. I can't wait to get my first student and start sharing.

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For those that do care, I did pass my ride. Better feeling that my first solo, far greater sense of accomplishment for me personally. I can't wait to get my first student and start sharing.
Who knows, I may end up being your first commercial student... ;)
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A couple of other quick notes. First expect to discuss MEL's and CDL's. MEL being Minimum Equipment List and CDL being Configuration Deviation List. The FAA is getting heavy on these items right now. Also to cover the sign offs, there is an Advisory Circular that is quite clear and concise which works good in your Instructors Guide. Go into the oral with a copy of the FAR's. You don't need to know them cold, but ytou do need to know where to look.

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