Jump to content

CFI Checkride


Recommended Posts

I have my CFI checkride this Sunday with Rich Lee in a R-22. The FOI's are killing me, I did all my writtens over a year ago and forgot most of what I learned. I can fly and talk fine, I just have to get to the helicopter. What did some of you do to get the FOI's in your brain?

 

Jerry

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This Sunday, huh? I just passed mine on the 19th.

I think if you re-read the Aviation Inst. Handbook again, wrote out the high points(Characteristics, Princples and such) you'll do okay. Cramming for a test never helped me, but a few days of honest studying can't hurt. A friend to practice Association games and hints works great.

 

Good luck.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have my CFI checkride this Sunday with Rich Lee in a R-22. The FOI's are killing me, I did all my writtens over a year ago and forgot most of what I learned. I can fly and talk fine, I just have to get to the helicopter. What did some of you do to get the FOI's in your brain?

 

Jerry

 

Flash cards...

 

nuf said

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Heres two freebies.

 

The Characteristics of Learning: REEPIR

 

R ecency

E xercise

E ffect

P urposeful

I ntensity

R esult of Experience

 

The Characteristics of an Effective Critique: COATSCOF

 

C omprehensive

O bjective

A cceptable

T houghtful

S uitable

C onstructive

O rganized

F lexible

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Definition of Learning: A change in behavior as a result of experience.

 

Common Defense Mechanisms:

 

C ompensation

P rojection

R ationalization

 

D enial

R eaction Formation

 

F light

A ggression

R esignation

 

Levels of Learning:

 

R ote

U nderstanding

A pplication

C orrelation

 

Yadda, yadda, yadda. Go through the tasks in the FOI section of the PTS and just make sure you know each one. Also, practice creating/teaching lesson plans.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A couple of points. The examiner doesn't expect you to know everything. I have seen a couple examiners who will ask questions they are pretty sure you don't know to see how you handle them. If this is the case or you get a question you hit a blank wall on, I would suggest you at least have an idea where to find the answer. Then look it up. Examiners like to see that. DO NOT, DON'T EVER, DON'T NEVER EVER try to BS the answer. It will blow up in your face.

 

Good luck.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A couple of points. The examiner doesn't expect you to know everything. I have seen a couple examiners who will ask questions they are pretty sure you don't know to see how you handle them. If this is the case or you get a question you hit a blank wall on, I would suggest you at least have an idea where to find the answer. Then look it up. Examiners like to see that. DO NOT, DON'T EVER, DON'T NEVER EVER try to BS the answer. It will blow up in your face.

 

Good luck.

 

EXACTLY!!!

 

 

Good luck!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You're not a good flight instructor because you can recite the book with your eyes closed. A good instructor provides clear expectations, guides the student to the right material, and gives additional insight to the material. If you can tell a student what the book says, why not have them read it instead?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You're not a good flight instructor because you can recite the book with your eyes closed. A good instructor provides clear expectations, guides the student to the right material, and gives additional insight to the material. If you can tell a student what the book says, why not have them read it instead?

 

 

I wish I could recite the book with my eyes closed. ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

i did my checkride a week ago, with a dpe AND the faa (it was a observed ride for the dpe) .... talk about nerve racking! I was told in the beginning that it is open book, no once expects you to know everything. they would rather you look something up and be able to expand on what you read than be able to recite it..and possibly recite it wrong. take your time, have EVERYTHING marked and tabbed for quick reference and you'll do fine. try and teach your family or g/f about retreating blade stall and different things. that is what i did. no offense to my g/f, but if you can make a girl understand dissymetry of lift and retreating blade stall, then you can make ANYONE who is motivated to learn understand it.

 

clay

Link to comment
Share on other sites

i did my checkride a week ago, with a dpe AND the faa (it was a observed ride for the dpe) .... talk about nerve racking! I was told in the beginning that it is open book, no once expects you to know everything. they would rather you look something up and be able to expand on what you read than be able to recite it..and possibly recite it wrong. take your time, have EVERYTHING marked and tabbed for quick reference and you'll do fine. try and teach your family or g/f about retreating blade stall and different things. that is what i did. no offense to my g/f, but if you can make a girl understand dissymetry of lift and retreating blade stall, then you can make ANYONE who is motivated to learn understand it.

 

clay

 

And she is still your girlfriend?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

i did my checkride a week ago, with a dpe AND the faa (it was a observed ride for the dpe) .... talk about nerve racking! I was told in the beginning that it is open book, no once expects you to know everything. they would rather you look something up and be able to expand on what you read than be able to recite it..and possibly recite it wrong. take your time, have EVERYTHING marked and tabbed for quick reference and you'll do fine. try and teach your family or g/f about retreating blade stall and different things. that is what i did. no offense to my g/f, but if you can make a girl understand dissymetry of lift and retreating blade stall, then you can make ANYONE who is motivated to learn understand it.

 

clay

 

Wow, that is so sexist. Is that how your think of women? I have taught several woman to fly in the past and I am teaching one at present. They are much easier to teach than the men who think they know it all because they are a man. Do you think the woman who birthed you and raised you from a helpless infant is inferior to you as well?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A couple of points. The examiner doesn't expect you to know everything. I have seen a couple examiners who will ask questions they are pretty sure you don't know to see how you handle them. If this is the case or you get a question you hit a blank wall on, I would suggest you at least have an idea where to find the answer. Then look it up. Examiners like to see that. DO NOT, DON'T EVER, DON'T NEVER EVER try to BS the answer. It will blow up in your face.

 

Good luck.

 

I also agree with this statement. Come prepared with the materials you need to look something up if necessary.

 

There are something you better have memorized, and others you can look up. Part of the check ride is to insure you know which is which. They aren't looking for perfection, but rather an ability to teach.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guys, I think he meant if you can teach someone like his girlfriend, or my wife, who could not care any less about a helicopter, you will be able to teach someone who is really eager to learn. I don't think he was assuming all females are inferior, just the fact that the vast majority are not interested in rotary wing aerodynamics.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I appreciate the comments, I had most of the acronyms already and I have printed out most of the AC/AD/whatever I need. In the morning I plan on making the index so I can find the information if I need to look it up.

Here is the email I received for what he wants.

 

 

If you have not read "Plane Sense" [ http://www.faa.gov/library/manuals/aviatio...a-h-8083-19.pdf ] , I strongly suggest you do so before the checkride.

 

Know how to check for water in fuel according to the FAA by reading AC 20-125 Water in Aviation Fuel. [ http://rgl.faa.gov/Regulatory_and_Guidance...23?OpenDocument ]

 

Have the 'aircraft/engine records' available and be prepare to prove the aircraft is airworthy.

 

Know the applicable 'AIRWORTHINESS DIRECTIVES' and be prepared to explain each to me. If inspection of a part is involved you should know how to find and inspect the part and if you don't, talk with a mechanic before the checkride.

 

Be prepared to prove that you would be qualified and current to make this flight as if you are a Rotorcraft Helicopter Certified Flight Instructor.

 

Make a VFR flight plan but do not file.

 

Get weather and NOTAMS prior to the checkride and be prepared to brief me.

 

Calculate Gross Weight, CG, Hover OGE, Hover IGE, Limit MP for take-off prior to the checkride. Extrapolate temperature if necessary for a take-off at 1:00 PM (1300 Hrs).

 

The lesson I would like you to give to me is 'CONFINED AREA LANDINGS' at the Commercial Pilot experience level to include a discussion of 'procedures to get permission to land at a shopping at a shopping mall'.

Think about how you would go about such a landing and be prepared to

defend your opinion.

 

You will be required to demonstrate the ability to perform a 'TOUCHDOWN AUTOROTATION' to a pre-selected point within PTS tolerance.

 

You can expect to demonstrate a 'CONFINED AREA LANDING' at the Commercial Pilot experience level so you should have an area selected prior to the checkride that is suitable.

 

You will be expected to demonstrate a 'STEEP APPROACH TO THE GROUND (NO

HOVER)' at the Commercial Pilot experience level to include a discussion of why a landing directly to the ground might be necessary or desirable.

 

You will be expected to teach me how to 'START THE HELICOPTER USING A CHECKLIST' at the Private Pilot experience level to include a discussion of how you would supervise - as the CFI - the start in general, and how you would prevent an inadvertent over speed during start in particular.

 

You will be expected to demonstrate a 'QUICK STOP or RAPID DECELERATION' at the Commercial Pilot experience level.

 

You will be expected to demonstrate a 'HOVERING AUTOROTATION' at the Commercial Pilot experience level and be prepared to discuss the difference in response between stationary hover and a hovering forward situation to an engine out emergency.

 

You will be expected to discuss 'LOSS OF ANTI-TORQUE EFFECTIVENESS' to include an explanation of how you might inadvertently get into that situation and how you as a CFI can demonstrate LTE in the helicopter.

Think about why and/or how we do things (e.g. why we would choose to land to the ground rather than to a hover, how might a helicopter pilot encounter retreating blade stall)

 

If you plan to use GPS check scheduled GPS interference [ http://www.navcen.uscg.gov/gps/gpsnotices/...nterference.pdf ] to make sure the signal will be accurate.

 

There are mandatory tasks in the PTS that you 'WILL' be asked so be

prepared for those because you know each mandatory task will be covered.

 

Know about helicopters [ http://rgl.faa.gov/Regulatory_and_Guidance...soryCircular.ns f/0/412DE833D6BAA71286256F340060C072?OpenDocument&Highlight=heliport ]

Know the difference between a heli-stop and a heli-port. Know what a FATO is.

 

Know the difference between a 'HOVER TAXI' and a 'AIR TAXI' and be prepared to cite sources to back up your definition.

 

Know logbook entry and endorsements. Be prepared to show your 'AUTHORITY' to make logbook entries and endorsements. Know the R-22 specific endorsement and requirements to fly.

 

Know how to find guidance as to the recommended procedure give a 'FLIGHT REVIEW'.

 

Know how to fill out an '8710-1'. If you have not read the instructions attached to the 8710-1 application form and in the CFI handbook - DO SO before the checkride.

 

Nearly all questions to you will be scenario based. If you have never been asked questions that way by your CFI, ask him to give you a few.

As an example, I will tell you I am a pilot who has come to you for a Flight Review and then I will just sit there and expect you to give me one in accordance with the appropriate guidance. There may be a few follow up questions. I might stop you in the middle of an explanation ..... but you will be expected to know what to do and to do it rather than respond to individual questions.

 

 

Sound like fun to you?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wow, that is so sexist. Is that how your think of women? I have taught several woman to fly in the past and I am teaching one at present. They are much easier to teach than the men who think they know it all because they are a man. Do you think the woman who birthed you and raised you from a helpless infant is inferior to you as well?

 

 

alright,

ya threw that one out of context... it was strictly used to demostrate that my G/F doesnt have ANY interest in helicopters, and if she can understand things that im trying to teach her, then someone who is MOTIVATED to learn can definatly remember what im trying to get across.. and i have flown with girls who are very good sticks too. . ( dont take that out of context though)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

alright,

ya threw that one out of context... it was strictly used to demostrate that my G/F doesnt have ANY interest in helicopters, and if she can understand things that im trying to teach her, then someone who is MOTIVATED to learn can definatly remember what im trying to get across.. and i have flown with girls who are very good sticks too. . ( dont take that out of context though)

 

"but if you can make a girl understand dissymetry of lift and retreating blade stall, then you can make ANYONE who is motivated to learn understand it."

 

Yeah, thats not what you meant, but nice try. You need to join the 21st Century and start thinking of women as your equal.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I appreciate the comments, I had most of the acronyms already and I have printed out most of the AC/AD/whatever I need. In the morning I plan on making the index so I can find the information if I need to look it up.

Here is the email I received for what he wants.

 

 

If you have not read "Plane Sense" [ http://www.faa.gov/library/manuals/aviatio...a-h-8083-19.pdf ] , I strongly suggest you do so before the checkride.

 

Know how to check for water in fuel according to the FAA by reading AC 20-125 Water in Aviation Fuel. [ http://rgl.faa.gov/Regulatory_and_Guidance...23?OpenDocument ]

 

Have the 'aircraft/engine records' available and be prepare to prove the aircraft is airworthy.

 

Know the applicable 'AIRWORTHINESS DIRECTIVES' and be prepared to explain each to me. If inspection of a part is involved you should know how to find and inspect the part and if you don't, talk with a mechanic before the checkride.

 

Be prepared to prove that you would be qualified and current to make this flight as if you are a Rotorcraft Helicopter Certified Flight Instructor.

 

Make a VFR flight plan but do not file.

 

Get weather and NOTAMS prior to the checkride and be prepared to brief me.

 

Calculate Gross Weight, CG, Hover OGE, Hover IGE, Limit MP for take-off prior to the checkride. Extrapolate temperature if necessary for a take-off at 1:00 PM (1300 Hrs).

 

The lesson I would like you to give to me is 'CONFINED AREA LANDINGS' at the Commercial Pilot experience level to include a discussion of 'procedures to get permission to land at a shopping at a shopping mall'.

Think about how you would go about such a landing and be prepared to

defend your opinion.

 

You will be required to demonstrate the ability to perform a 'TOUCHDOWN AUTOROTATION' to a pre-selected point within PTS tolerance.

 

You can expect to demonstrate a 'CONFINED AREA LANDING' at the Commercial Pilot experience level so you should have an area selected prior to the checkride that is suitable.

 

You will be expected to demonstrate a 'STEEP APPROACH TO THE GROUND (NO

HOVER)' at the Commercial Pilot experience level to include a discussion of why a landing directly to the ground might be necessary or desirable.

 

You will be expected to teach me how to 'START THE HELICOPTER USING A CHECKLIST' at the Private Pilot experience level to include a discussion of how you would supervise - as the CFI - the start in general, and how you would prevent an inadvertent over speed during start in particular.

 

You will be expected to demonstrate a 'QUICK STOP or RAPID DECELERATION' at the Commercial Pilot experience level.

 

You will be expected to demonstrate a 'HOVERING AUTOROTATION' at the Commercial Pilot experience level and be prepared to discuss the difference in response between stationary hover and a hovering forward situation to an engine out emergency.

 

You will be expected to discuss 'LOSS OF ANTI-TORQUE EFFECTIVENESS' to include an explanation of how you might inadvertently get into that situation and how you as a CFI can demonstrate LTE in the helicopter.

Think about why and/or how we do things (e.g. why we would choose to land to the ground rather than to a hover, how might a helicopter pilot encounter retreating blade stall)

 

If you plan to use GPS check scheduled GPS interference [ http://www.navcen.uscg.gov/gps/gpsnotices/...nterference.pdf ] to make sure the signal will be accurate.

 

There are mandatory tasks in the PTS that you 'WILL' be asked so be

prepared for those because you know each mandatory task will be covered.

 

Know about helicopters [ http://rgl.faa.gov/Regulatory_and_Guidance...soryCircular.ns f/0/412DE833D6BAA71286256F340060C072?OpenDocument&Highlight=heliport ]

Know the difference between a heli-stop and a heli-port. Know what a FATO is.

 

Know the difference between a 'HOVER TAXI' and a 'AIR TAXI' and be prepared to cite sources to back up your definition.

 

Know logbook entry and endorsements. Be prepared to show your 'AUTHORITY' to make logbook entries and endorsements. Know the R-22 specific endorsement and requirements to fly.

 

Know how to find guidance as to the recommended procedure give a 'FLIGHT REVIEW'.

 

Know how to fill out an '8710-1'. If you have not read the instructions attached to the 8710-1 application form and in the CFI handbook - DO SO before the checkride.

 

Nearly all questions to you will be scenario based. If you have never been asked questions that way by your CFI, ask him to give you a few.

As an example, I will tell you I am a pilot who has come to you for a Flight Review and then I will just sit there and expect you to give me one in accordance with the appropriate guidance. There may be a few follow up questions. I might stop you in the middle of an explanation ..... but you will be expected to know what to do and to do it rather than respond to individual questions.

 

 

Sound like fun to you?

 

 

Thank you for posting this. This is at least a great study guide for this one particular DPE. It is great to have a good idea of what the DPE will be expecting.

 

Thanks again,

RR

Edited by RotorRunner
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just passed my checkride! Because I have my Advanced Ground Instructor I didn't have any FOI questions...all that stress for nothing. I learned more than I taught with him, might be the 25,000 hours he has.

Now for CFII

 

Jerry

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just passed my checkride! Because I have my Advanced Ground Instructor I didn't have any FOI questions...all that stress for nothing. I learned more than I taught with him, might be the 25,000 hours he has.

Now for CFII

 

Jerry

 

Congrats! Way to go!

 

Out of curiosity, how long was the oral?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I started at 8:00 and finished at Noon without any breaks, he said not having to do the FOI's knocked about 2 hours off. My flight was a 1.4 and included SFAR73 manuvers including vortex ring state with a tail wind, a teach a couple of confines, slopes, quick stop, running landing, 180 full down, teach hover auto, teach pickups and normal takeoff. It was my worst full down but I touched down 10 feet before the spot and slid to 10 feet past it in no wind. I said it was my worst one and he said it was good enough to get your certificate...and that was when I knew I passed. I thought I blew it on the slope when my skid caught in a rut and my pick-up was jerky and sliding off down hill.

That was the most stressful checkride I've ever had.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...