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mickey77

Which offshore company?

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Ok yall...I want to fly offshore, but which company should I go for? Are they all the same? Or maybe...is there any I should stay away from? I know NOTHING about the offshore flying. What's involved, if its any fun? Thanks much for any info!!

Mickey

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Ok yall...I want to fly offshore, but which company should I go for? Are they all the same? Or maybe...is there any I should stay away from? I know NOTHING about the offshore flying. What's involved, if its any fun? Thanks much for any info!!

Mickey

As much as they pissed me off, I do not deny that PHI is the Gulf Company to shoot for...the training and upgrades are worth the pain...They, Phi, Will train you in a Pro manner and it is Gold should you ever leave.......

Roger...33 years PHI....Bell 47 to the S92

 

 

BTW...I quit during the Strike with PHI...BUT...as mad as I am, I will NEVER deny how GOOD the old PHI was to me, but how Pro the New Phi is....As far as FUN...VERY LITTLE!!!....BUT flying being Fun and a joy in itself is a mind game...What a beauty to enjoy a short minute without pax and remember where you are AT and the LOVE of an ability to prance the machine.....Hope all is well.

Roger

Edited by PhotoFlyer

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Ok yall...I want to fly offshore, but which company should I go for? Are they all the same? Or maybe...is there any I should stay away from? I know NOTHING about the offshore flying. What's involved, if its any fun? Thanks much for any info!!

Mickey

 

The training at Air Logistics and the opportunities available make it the best out there. Upgrades to B407s and the S76 are readily available. Yes, you will drive a B206 for a while, but upgrades come within a six months to year. If you want to fly in Alaska or Africa, those opportunities are available as well. We've pilots moving over there regularly.

 

Also, if you want a high time job, there are a LOT of them available here. The weather and customer requirements keep it interesting. If you are NOT up to living in a rural area in somewhat spartan conditions, then you may not be happy here. No Starbucks or bagel shops near the bases. But the food offshore is generally very good if not a bit heavy, lots of steaks and seafood. The upside is you have 7 or 14 days off to do what you want, where you want. If your commute is long distance, take two days off for travel.

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The training at Air Logistics and the opportunities available make it the best out there. Upgrades to B407s and the S76 are readily available. Yes, you will drive a B206 for a while, but upgrades come within a six months to year. If you want to fly in Alaska or Africa, those opportunities are available as well. We've pilots moving over there regularly.

 

Also, if you want a high time job, there are a LOT of them available here. The weather and customer requirements keep it interesting. If you are NOT up to living in a rural area in somewhat spartan conditions, then you may not be happy here. No Starbucks or bagel shops near the bases. But the food offshore is generally very good if not a bit heavy, lots of steaks and seafood. The upside is you have 7 or 14 days off to do what you want, where you want. If your commute is long distance, take two days off for travel.

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Thanks for the info guys! What about RLC? And also,was the training hard? I have NO idea what to expect!! Everyone tells me its hard working with the customers. That they try to push you into doing things not safe. Is that true? I think RLC and Air Log don't make you sighn a contract. But how is the training? I mean, if Im not comfortable with something, are they gonna can me over it?

Mickey77

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Thanks for the info guys! What about RLC? And also,was the training hard? I have NO idea what to expect!! Everyone tells me its hard working with the customers. That they try to push you into doing things not safe. Is that true? I think RLC and Air Log don't make you sighn a contract. But how is the training? I mean, if Im not comfortable with something, are they gonna can me over it?

Mickey77

I work at RLC and I think it is a pretty good place to work. I have not worked at another Gulf

company, so I cannot compare. The one thing I do wish was different about RLC is that the Gulf

is pretty much the extent of their operation. NOBODY is going to make you do anything unsafe.

In fact, it's the opposite. If you get a reputation for flying unsafe, you're history. If you don't like

the weather and no-go, that's the end of it. If you're not comfortable flying over water and doing

approaches to pinnacles all day, don't apply. It's pretty routine. You do everything the way they

taught you in training (I mean no hot-dogging), you'll do fine.

Edited by helonorth

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... And also,was the training hard? I have NO idea what to expect!! Everyone tells me its hard working with the customers. That they try to push you into doing things not safe. Is that true? I think RLC and Air Log don't make you sighn a contract. But how is the training? I mean, if Im not comfortable with something, are they gonna can me over it?

Mickey77

 

"Was the training hard?" No- do it the company way, no matter how you used to do it.

 

As to the customers push "you into doing things not safe"- you're the expert, the guy responsible- The PIC. Customers buy a service, some have done it long enough that they know stuff, some think they know stuff, and some couldn't tell a Bell from an Ford F250. They are always the customer, so sometimes you have to find a polite way of saying no. Works better if you followed by "but if we..." Follow the rules all the time, give 100%, be professional and consistent- and remember, you never win an argument with a customer.

 

"I mean, if Im not comfortable with something, are they gonna can me over it?" Yes, and this is why I'm posting- Yes, yes, yes!- you can be terminated for "not being comfortable with something". Offshore is different, and the offshore oil patch has it's own idiosyncrasies. Most pilots screw themselves outta the job, though.

Some guys never get used to flying over water- By bye, friend.

Some guys only have a problem when the weather's skosh, or never say no for weather- adios.

Some guys have problems with fuel calculations; they can never have enough; or always have too much. If you can't be trained outta this, you're probably never going to work out. Boudreaux might not be a professional aviator, but he notices when you can never do what the other pilots he's worked with routinely have done.

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I work at RLC and I think it is a pretty good place to work. I have not worked at another Gulf

company, so I cannot compare. The one thing I do wish was different about RLC is that the Gulf

is pretty much the extent of their operation. NOBODY is going to make you do anything unsafe.

In fact, it's the opposite. If you get a reputation for flying unsafe, you're history. If you don't like

the weather and no-go, that's the end of it. If you're not comfortable flying over water and doing

approaches to pinnacles all day, don't apply. It's pretty routine. You do everything the way they

taught you in training (I mean no hot-dogging), you'll do fine.

 

 

Helonorth,

 

How much flying are you getting in at RLC? I heard rumors of pool pilots at PHI sitting around most of the time. Don't know how much of that is true and how much is fiction, but would like to know.

 

Any input?

 

Five0

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If you plan to work in the GOM, you really, really need to learn the Nancy Reagan method. Learn to just say no, and mean it. I've had foremen and operators from companies which preach safety the loudest and longest try to get me to do some of the stupidest things, usually forbidden in their manuals, just because they thought it was the expedient thing to do at the time. You need to be tactful about it, and it helps if you have a previous history of getting the job done, but they will eventually try to get you to do things that will get you (and them) killed. I was never worried about the ones who wanted me to do stupid stuff, because running me off the job was doing me a favor. My boss wouldn't fire me, I would just be assigned to another job, usually better. I was never run off a job, but I was threatened a few times, and I stood my ground every time, because I knew I was right. You have to know your stuff, and do the job, but never give in to BS. It's not easy, but it is essential.

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I wholeheartedly agree with everything Gomer says above. In the offshore environment, as in others, people's survival literally depends on it.

 

Bob

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I've had foremen and operators from companies which preach safety the loudest and longest try to get me to do some of the stupidest things, usually forbidden in their manuals, just because they thought it was the expedient thing to do at the time. You need to be tactful about it, and it helps if you have a previous history of getting the job done, but they will eventually try to get you to do things that will get you (and them) killed.

 

And we all would hate to lose another Friend...

 

P.S. I know this isn't the right place to put this, but have they released his full report?

Edited by Future206Pilot

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And we all would hate to lose another Friend...

 

P.S. I know this isn't the right place to put this, but have they released his full report?

 

Funny you ask...checked yesterday and not yet

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Helonorth,

 

How much flying are you getting in at RLC? I heard rumors of pool pilots at PHI sitting around most of the time. Don't know how much of that is true and how much is fiction, but would like to know.

 

Any input?

 

Five0

 

Last summer I flew about 50-60 hours on my 14 on. I would work over a lot, but usually as a spare,

so not much flying. We don't have pool pilots. Just about everyone gets a contract in one or two

hitches. Low flying time contracts are in the 20 hour range. High flying time contracts can fly

80-100 hours. I also have heard about PHI being heavy on pilots and the pool pilots doing very

little flying. That's what good about RLC. Everyone gets a contract, so you go to the same base,

fly the same aircraft and work with the same people all the time. On a side note, I have not in

my mere 9 months of Gulf time, been pressured to fly. Most of the time everyone is flying or

no one is flying. I think the attitudes have changed. The companies an their passengers don't

want to end up in the water anymore than you do. You are paid to do a job safely and they

respect your decision. But if it's marginal, you are expected to fly. If you are not comfortable

with 500 and 3 miles, do yourself a favor and do something else.

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... We don't have pool pilots. Just about everyone gets a contract in one or two hitches. ...

Does one bid or get assigned a contract? Do they "shadow" anyone first or are they "thrown to the wolves"?

 

... That's what good about RLC. Everyone gets a contract, so you go to the same base, fly the same aircraft and work with the same people all the time. ...

Maybe you're on a contract where these work out. They aren't all good things in every case.

 

... On a side note, I have not in my mere 9 months of Gulf time, been pressured to fly. Most of the time everyone is flying or no one is flying. I think the attitudes have changed. The companies an their passengers don't want to end up in the water anymore than you do. You are paid to do a job safely and they respect your decision. ...

I'm glad you've not been pressured, but flying just because everyone else is flying has gotten people killed. Change? Respect? Safety? I won't even get started except to state that perceived safety and actual safety are two different things.

 

... But if it's marginal, you are expected to fly. If you are not comfortable with 500 and 3 miles, do yourself a favor and do something else.

How about less than 1.55 NM visibilty and a 300 foot indefinite ceiling? I've been seriously pressured to fly in exactly those conditions on break day to the point that a lead operator was beating the walls with their fists because I wouldn't launch. Or flying in 40+ knot winds? I know of a pilot run off a contract because they refused to when "everyone else is doing it". Think about taking a swim in those conditions. Or being asked to take off for the beach 95+ NM away 38 minutes before down time. Or ...

 

Good judgement keeps people alive. Pressure, overconfidence, and bravado can be deadly. I hope to continue discussing things here rather than posting to another condolence thread .. or having someone post to mine ...

 

Those reading please don't get me wrong. The GOM can be a great place to work and provides lots of experiences and fullfillment. But like anything in aviation, things can and do go wrong. Sometimes the very best decision is the one we'd rather not choose.

 

Bob

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If you haven't felt pressure to fly, you're either very lucky or haven't been paying attention. It happens all the time, and I just expected it. You have to be strong enough to stand up to it when you need to. Sometimes 500/3 is fine, and sometimes you really have to refuse it - it depends on the weather pattern, your load, and lots of other things, and you have to know when to just say no. It takes judgment, and judgment comes from experience. If you're really lucky, you'll just scare yourself a few times and learn from it. If you're not, you'll end up sleeping with the fish.

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If you haven't felt pressure to fly, you're either very lucky or haven't been paying attention. It happens all the time, and I just expected it. You have to be strong enough to stand up to it when you need to. Sometimes 500/3 is fine, and sometimes you really have to refuse it - it depends on the weather pattern, your load, and lots of other things, and you have to know when to just say no. It takes judgment, and judgment comes from experience. If you're really lucky, you'll just scare yourself a few times and learn from it. If you're not, you'll end up sleeping with the fish.

 

Let's see... maybe I haven't been paying attention. Been pressured to fly? No. Not really. They

certainly make it clear they have things to do, but until I say we go, they leave me alone. As far

as taking off "just because everyone else is flying", how stupid do you think I am? (don't answer).

I fly when I can fly, period. You're customers sound like a real drag, relyon. Probably because

the pilot before you DID fly in those conditions. You guys sure make it complicated. It's not.

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... You're customers sound like a real drag, relyon. Probably because the pilot before you DID fly in those conditions. You guys sure make it complicated. It's not.

Exactly how am I making things more complicated? Because I refused to fly in conditions that were against federal regulations, company operational rules, and could have very well gotten my passengers and me killed? I think you are either over-simplifying the realities of flying in the GOM or you have been fortunate not to have encountered situations that often occur. It's not just my current customer as I've seen many examples on many contracts. None of this is to say that all or most things are bad about flying in the GOM. Quite the opposite in my experience as I've found most things to be good.

 

Bob

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