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Memorizing take off procedures

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Does anyone have any good advice, memory prompts that can help with memorizing the pre-start check thru hover ? I am trying to visualize everything in my head, I have a picture on powerpoint with the steps (every time I say a piece, I click and that step comes up ), When I am at stop lights, I state the process outloud in my car to myself... But, I still am not getting thru the whole process without looking at a cheat sheet.

Thanks ahead for any advice

:huh:

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You don't have to memorize pre-start to hover - That's what the checklist is for. Use it every time and you won't forget something important. The time will come when you have a helicopter full of people paying alot of money to be there and the last thing you want to do is light it off from memory. Especially if flying multiple makes or models. Just use the checklist and you won't be the guy that departs with less than sufficient fuel to complete the mission.

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You don't have to memorize pre-start to hover - That's what the checklist is for. Use it every time and you won't forget something important. The time will come when you have a helicopter full of people paying alot of money to be there and the last thing you want to do is light it off from memory. Especially if flying multiple makes or models. Just use the checklist and you won't be the guy that departs with less than sufficient fuel to complete the mission.

 

 

Thanks, I agree that the checklist is the tool to use. I may be misinterpretting a comment my cfi made, but I am doing this based on suggestion. I am sure that my cfi just wants me to speed up the process a bit, because I like to be thorough and meticulous with the checklist...and I THINK the goal is to know enough about the next few steps that I dont go too slow. Example might be...when I roll off throttle to separate the needles... Make sense? (I know, I'm slow and border line neurotic about being perfect)

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The efficiency will come as you proceed through your training. Go be anal about the emergency procedures and what to do when one of those lights or horns goes off. Sitting on the ground taking your time to get it started will never hurt anyone. Reacting properly when lights and horns are blazing will save lives.

 

Success and Happiness

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Thanks, I agree that the checklist is the tool to use. I may be misinterpretting a comment my cfi made, but I am doing this based on suggestion. I am sure that my cfi just wants me to speed up the process a bit, because I like to be thorough and meticulous with the checklist...and I THINK the goal is to know enough about the next few steps that I dont go too slow. Example might be...when I roll off throttle to separate the needles... Make sense? (I know, I'm slow and border line neurotic about being perfect)

The more you become familiar with the checklist, the more you will find that it should Flow....not jump from one side of the cockpit to the other in no order..let it flow and you will find a reasonable and Professional rythem with OUT doing it because you Have to, but recognizing why you are doing it...

Roger

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Thank you, it all makes sense...that is what my hed is telling me, so that means...you guys must be smart :D

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Something I did that helped me a lot was, I made my own checklist. It has exactly the same procedure as the original, but it is color coded and broken up into groups. I had it rigid laminated for durability. This gets you very familiar with the checklist too.

 

Like:

 

1. Adj. Tail Rotor Pedals and check security and condition of pins.

2. Check seatbelts and harness.

3. Clear center collective of all obstructions.

 

4. Release Frictions.

 

25. Turn fuel boost ON. Check for pressure.

26. Push mixture in for 5-6 sec. then pull off.

27. Turn fuel boost off.

 

32. Fuel boost ON

33. Alternator ON

34. Beacon ON

35. Radio ON

36. Transponder ON (alt. encoding)

 

68. Check switches and circuit breakers.

69. Check engine gauges.

70. Check all warning lights – OFF

71. Check fuel quantity.

 

 

You can load a short sequence in your head without having to refer back to the list after each line item.

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The best thing to do is to keep using the checklist. By doing so you will, with more practice, develop a flow pattern. Then you will be able to use your flow pattern and cross reference against the checklist to ensure you didn't forget anything.

 

You might as well just keep the checklist in hand becuse if you ever decide to fly outside of FAR part 91(PART 135 air taxi) then you will find in the regs that use of the checklist is mandatory. I still pull the checklist out everytime. The one time you don't, you will forget something.

 

Also, I tend to move around from aircraft types. For example, my last job had me flying the AS350D and the AS350BA. While simular, the procedures and start up are a little different. Using the checklist will prevent me from "forgetting" something when moving between aircraft types. I also fly airplanes so add that to the mix. It's almost impossible to memorize everything for every aircraft I fly with out using a reference of some sort.

 

RotorRunner is on to something. I also made my own quick reference checklist for each aircraft type I fly. This includes all normal procedures and emergency procedures. I will reference the emergency procedures before the first flight in a new aircraft type. Then I will reference the normal procedures for every start and shutdown as required.

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You should know the checklist and procedures well enough to make the checklist a reminder. You should be able to do the procedures, and refer to the checklist to make sure you didn't forget anything. It shouldn't take a long time to read the checklist, and that comes with practice and familiarity. Like hovering and flying, it's a matter of practice, and the more you do it the easier it gets.

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There have been several good points raised here. The biggest is the checklist is a CHECK list not a do list. For the most part the items do not have to be accomplished in the order listed. Usually they are listed in the most efficient manner, but not always. SOME items do need to be done in order, especially emergency procedures. If you get a chance, sit in an empty helicopter and run through the checklist several times. After while, it will become second nature to you. Keep in mind, each type machine and even different machines within the same type are different, with different switch positions and names.

 

It sounds like your instructor is trying to force you to become more efficient in your checklist usage. Don't worry, it will come with practice.

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That is alot to read...alot of thoughts about checklists.. I might need a checklist to ensure I get through it all. Is your name Pokey, or instigator (trying to make people think)??? :rolleyes:

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Does anyone have any good advice, memory prompts that can help with memorizing the pre-start check thru hover ? I am trying to visualize everything in my head, I have a picture on powerpoint with the steps (every time I say a piece, I click and that step comes up ), When I am at stop lights, I state the process outloud in my car to myself... But, I still am not getting thru the whole process without looking at a cheat sheet.

Thanks ahead for any advice

:huh:

 

Two philosophies on checklist. One is the "Check Do" type of list where the checklist tells you what to do in a sequence. The military uses that style because some check lists are very long and detailed. The second is the "check done" type of list where you learn a flow pattern (like during the startup sequence), then once you have completed your flow pattern, you do the check list to make certain you didn't miss anything. This is the style the airlines use.

 

I'm now evolving between the two types incorporating the best of both ways. As time progresses, you will have memorized the startup to hover flows just by repetition. At that point, use your check list as a "check done, did I forget anything" checklist!

 

Cheers

 

New Student :)

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Two philosophies on checklist. One is the "Check Do" type of list where the checklist tells you what to do in a sequence. The military uses that style because some check lists are very long and detailed. The second is the "check done" type of list where you learn a flow pattern (like during the startup sequence), then once you have completed your flow pattern, you do the check list to make certain you didn't miss anything. This is the style the airlines use.

 

I'm now evolving between the two types incorporating the best of both ways. As time progresses, you will have memorized the startup to hover flows just by repetition. At that point, use your check list as a "check done, did I forget anything" checklist!

 

Cheers

 

New Student :)

 

Very cool

Thanks (to everyone)

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A lot of check lists jump all over the cockpit for no real reason.

 

A flow that goes from top to bottom and left to right works in almost every aircraft, removing the out-of-sequence steps.

 

Then the pre-takeoff Vital Actions are those memorised 35 years ago for the Huey, and which apply happily to everything from an R22 to an S76:

Hatches

Harness

Heaters

Electrics

Fuel quantity, pressure and selection

Instruments - in limits, lights out

Audio

Auto

Full throttle

100%

 

Each section, such as electrics, involves a check that generators, inverters etc are on

and Instruments covers the IF checks for AI/ DG / HSI / glass.

Audio can be a check for the low RPM audio switch or it can be a check for radio frequencies, transmitter selectors, intercom volume, whatever.

Auto can be auto governor or autopilot switches to desired position.

100% can be 6600 N2 RPM for a Huey or 107% for an S76.

 

If it was able to stick in MY brain this long, it will work for anybody. :rolleyes:

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It depends a lot on the helicopter. The before takeoff checklist for a Robbie, or a 206, is far shorter and easier to memorize than the IFR before takeoff checklist for an S76C+. I can do the 206 from memory, after about 15,000 takeoffs, but I won't even try it for the S76.

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