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D.Kenyon Crash


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Does anyone know what type of ship it was..? Sorry guys and gals - just noticed the video link on the right.

 

Didn't know you could do that with a Hughes?

Edited by TomPPL
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Pretty hard impact. Glad he's ok!

 

Wow, check out the coning on that main rotor...you cant do that in an R 22 !

What is it I always say about having another 100 feet of altitude ?

Hey, you can't really say much when one guy can outfly 30,000 helicopter pilots in the US. He is fantastic just to watch.

 

Glad he's ok.

 

Goldy

Edited by Goldy
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Just another example of poor judgement by an experience pilot. To all the inexperienced pilots who seem to really admire this guy I'd say this:

 

- He's a stunt pilot, not a WORKING Commercial pilot flying a machine with the responsibility for PASSENGER or CREW safety everyday.

 

- However good he is, and apparently he does quite well, he is flying a machine that IS NOT certified for aerobatics, and doesn't have the performance margins to get out of trouble.

 

- He used poor judgement ATTEMPTING to perform his own little airshow in front of his friends/audience at that low an altitude. . It's obvious that he did not think out his routine well and factor in a safe altitude to perform his stunts. He's just another example of a pilot trying to show off and it biting him in the butt.

 

- To the dufus's who think he can out fly everybody, I just say PULLEESSE! I'm sure he is a good pilot, but let's see him in a revenue producing machine on a 200' LL, a B-206 at MGW in the GOM in summer, or bouncing between heliports in downtown NYC, flying everyday, safely and efficiently. Pilots that can do that everyday are my idea of pilots to be admired.

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Bayou06

 

You obviously don't know who or what you're talking about. Sounds like you belong over on the JH forums, mouthing off in ignorance.

 

I tend to agree, and have to believe that this guy doesn't know who DK is, else he would've had the sense to keep his trap SHUT.

 

Dave Blevins

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Taken from Dennis Kenyon's website.

 

Dennis is an ex Royal Air Force fixed wing pilot who has been involved in rotary wing flying instruction for 30 years and has trained around 200 pilots.

 

He has 13,000 flying hours and is CAA qualified to instruct on Enstrom 280 and 480 turbine, all models of Schweizer/Hughes 269 (300 series), plus all Hughes and McDonnell Douglas (MD500 models including the 520N) the fabulous Bell Jetranger series and the Robinson R22.

 

He is a CAA type rating examiner approved to conduct your PPL (H) skills test and annual LPC

 

 

And just to show he can still put on a show when required, he is a former world freestyle aerobatic champion, so you know you will be getting some superb training.

 

Dennis Kenyon has been flying helicopters since 1972 and will be happy to talk/chat/E mail to anyone interested in the Enstrom or the other corporate helicopters. Just make contact through this site.

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- To the dufus's who think he can out fly everybody

 

I believe that would be me. Mr Dufus to you. I do not take away from commercial pilots that fly day in and day out with the responsibility of lives on board. I would comment that when I am flying as a PPL in the 44, I have not just my own, but 3 other lives in my hand. A life is a life, doesnt matter if I'm getting paid to do it or not.

 

I have great admiration for this pilot. He screwed up yes he did. He wont be the last. But I also have great respect for the many hours he has flown before he ever started flying stunts, especially his military service.

 

Enough said, I'm done now.

 

Still glad he is ok. He can come fly and share some of his experiences with me anyday.

 

Goldy

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In a response to those who what to throw rocks, let me respond;

 

a. I know who Kenyon is and I've seen his performances. while some of the newbies on this thread think he's the end all be all of helo pilots, let me give you an analogy: While Thunderbirds and Blue Angel Demonstration pilots are great aerobatics pilots, the pilots that other pilots most RESPECT are the pilots flying the same F-16s & F-18s into harms way in Iraq and Afghanistan, doing their job while getting shot at. Those are the pilots deserving of respect.

 

b. While I did put a rather blunt point on it, DK misjudged his performance envelope and the performance of his machine (rented?) Is this arguable?

 

While it may be obvious that I am not overly impressed by stunt pilots. They are to be admired for spending lots of time flipping and flying around an aircraft in one very small discipline of aviation. It's studs like the USCG pilots that fly out in the pukiest weather at night, under goggles, hover over a boat in 50 knots winds and winch some poor schmuck from a sinking boat that impress me. Call me old fashioned.

Edited by Bayou06
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I get it now.....

 

So using your logic.....NASCAR drivers are not "real" drivers to be respected. It is the truck driver who logs 200,000 miles in a year on the highways without an accident or even a speeding ticket. He is the one that deserves our adoration. :rolleyes:

 

How about this..... I may be a fool in your eyes, but I still admire Dennis Kenyon. I would have loved the opportunity to fly with him but as he is retired, I will never have that opportunity.

 

I am not attacking you...but the whole tone of your posting on this topic sounds awfully negative. As a pilot, I am more then capable of figuring out whom to admire....and believe it or not, there is room for all kinds of pilots.....From guys like Dennis, to engineer test pilots like Nick Lappos, and all the way to the Russian pilots who flew giving their lives to put out the fires at Chernobyl. In closing, I dont think there is anything wrong with taking notice of great skill when you see it, and in the case of Dennis Kenyon, it would be hard to argue otherwise.

 

While your "truck driver" analogy is somewhat humorous, it does illustrate a good point. Stunt/demonstration pilots and NASCAR drivers both have one thing in common, they are both entertainers. While both are very skilled at what they do, are they the people who we should really hold on high? I compare that to all the admiration we give to professional athletes and actors. Me, I admire the Cop and Firefighter.

 

If I came off negative, it was because it seemed like everyone was giving Kenyon a pass because he was such a "great pilot". Yet we castigate, second guess, and judge the working pilot who flies day in and day out, who makes a error in judgement. I don't buy that. He screwed up and should be held accountable for it, just like any other pilot who didn't use the best judgement.

 

Regardless, I think we've beat this part of the thread up enough.

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Bayou6

 

I think you might want to check into the background of the person you slam before you do so. You might just google him.

 

Dennis Kenyon up to this accident, logged over 13,000 accident free hours. He has put on over 1200 displays, is certified by the CAA as a display pilot. If you were familiar with his displays he has incredible talent and had provided a spectacular and SAFE show for many years. Anyone who flies makes mistakes and when you operate as close to the edge as he does, it is amazing that it has not happened before. It is just another testament to his skill and professionalism that it has not.

 

Even the Blue Angles and Thunderbirds have accidents and it would be hard to argue they are not professional.

 

He was operating at a field elevation of almost 5000' which he is not used to and the temp was 32C out. He was aware of the higher DA and had practiced earlier in the day. He had flown for an hour and a half practicing prior to the show. He had the helicopter 300 lbs lighter in fuel for the show, and lifted the height of each maneuver by 50' and speed by 10 kts. He said "it wasn't enough and [he] just didn't have enough induced lift to recover from the steep descent following the 270 degree wing over".

 

This is a link to one of his performances:

 

 

 

JTravis

 

This must be the first time someone has used my words in a quote, even if it was JH, I am impressed. I am happy to find out someone thought it was not completely useless :P . Thanks.

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