Jump to content

Is it really that hard?


Guest rookie101
 Share

Recommended Posts

Guest rookie101

I've read through this forum, and several others, and a lot of you pro guys say that this job is really hard to find work. My question is, is it really that hard? With all of the stuff I've read, it makes a rookie like me want to run for the hills!! Could anybody in here please clarify how hard it really can be to get a job. I know that the liklehood of getting a job will vary with helicopters already flown, total hours, current location and even if you like the place you're going to work at, but what other things might it inquire, i.e. your personality, people skills, or knowing a second or even third languge. I know a lot of the guys who say that it can be hard to find a job are just telling the truth about the helo business, and the truth is always better than a lie. My decision to fly is not for money, but for the love of flying and I can't really fly if I don't have any work to do.

Hope everyone has a safe and merry Christmas and lets not forget on this Christmas our men and women over in Iraq, and everywhere else in the world, who are away from home protecting use from what ever may come our way :)

 

rookie101

Edited by rookie101
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Having contacts are great, but you think they are almost as important as your experience flying? You could know every bigshot in the industry but they still won't hire you unless you have sufficient experience and flight time to be safe. Of course if you have a good amount of hours and flight time, then I can see where your contacts are almost as important.

 

Anywho, rookie101, who cares if it's easy or hard to find work? If it's what you truely love to do, and you work hard at it, then you'll be better off and happier than you've ever been before. The jobs are out there, just do the same amount of research on where you want to go work as you do searching for a flight school.

 

Merry Christmas (or Happy Holidays if you're one of those critical people),

- Robert

Link to comment
Share on other sites

With a CFII ticket, it's easy to find an instructing job, easier still if you have 50 R22 hours and the SFAR, and a job will be yours in less than a week if you have 200 R22 hours, the SFAR and the double I.

 

With only a CFI (no instrument rating), finding a CFI job will take much longer, but they do appear (think months instead of weeks).

 

With only a Commercial rating, finding ANY work will be hard untill you have over 1,000 PIC in helicopters. You'll have to buy or beg hours, and employers WILL look harder at your logbook to see what kind of flying you've been doing. People may talk up or talk down instruction flying, but everyine knows pretty much exactly what you've been doing (and that you've actually DONE it) over the last 800 hours. Not necessarily true of those 800 Rotorway hours in the old logbook...

 

Barring relatives in the industry or phenomenal luck, there are no easy ways in, but if you do the work, get the instrument and CFII, do a solid job as an instructor while keeping out of trouble, you will have no problem moving into the next level. There is no critical shortage of 1,000-hour pilots, but there is plenty of opportunity for good new ones.

Edited by flingwing206
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Having contacts are great, but you think they are almost as important as your experience flying? You could know every bigshot in the industry but they still won't hire you unless you have sufficient experience and flight time to be safe. Of course if you have a good amount of hours and flight time, then I can see where your contacts are almost as important.

 

 

well, obviously not AS important as flight experience....i mean, who cares who you know if you don't know how to fly a helicopter! But it is important in that it can help you get an interview, etc etc.

 

just my 2 cents

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Experience, contacts, & location.

 

First you have to have the minimum requirements for the job to get on the insurance. Any extra experience above those minimums (hours, ratings, degrees, etc) is a plus.

 

Second, make contacts. Go to Heli-Expo and talk to everyone at the job fair. Stop by other flight schools and take an hour of instruction. Post a lot of messages here. The main thing is, get your name out there. This is such a small industry......that works in a bad way too.

 

Finally, be willing to move. The jobs are out there, they're just scattered around the country. If you can move around for a few years, you build hours FAST. If you're holding out for your home town, major city, or even region, it may take a while longer.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Greetings,

 

Jobs like logging, fire fighting, ems, etc. are all about hours logged and, I've noticed, turbine hours. But, having worked at my flight school refueling, customer service and what not; I got a few rare opportunities to actually fly scenic and photo flights. After not too long people I had never met or seen would come in looking for such a flight and request me as the pilot. :blink: I don't know if such instances are common. Perhaps it was just luck.

 

But, I agree, instructing is the best way to get hours. It also expands your knowledge when you have to teach someone else the ropes. Having heard stories from other instructors, it also keeps you on your toes!

 

Cheers

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 months later...
With a CFII ticket, it's easy to find an instructing job, easier still if you have 50 R22 hours and the SFAR, and a job will be yours in less than a week if you have 200 R22 hours, the SFAR and the double I.

 

With only a CFI (no instrument rating), finding a CFI job will take much longer, but they do appear (think months instead of weeks).

 

With only a Commercial rating, finding ANY work will be hard untill you have over 1,000 PIC in helicopters. You'll have to buy or beg hours, and employers WILL look harder at your logbook to see what kind of flying you've been doing. People may talk up or talk down instruction flying, but everyine knows pretty much exactly what you've been doing (and that you've actually DONE it) over the last 800 hours. Not necessarily true of those 800 Rotorway hours in the old logbook...

 

Barring relatives in the industry or phenomenal luck, there are no easy ways in, but if you do the work, get the instrument and CFII, do a solid job as an instructor while keeping out of trouble, you will have no problem moving into the next level. There is no critical shortage of 1,000-hour pilots, but there is plenty of opportunity for good new ones.

 

 

I finished my CFI/CFII and it took me about 3 months to find a CFI job, and even for that i had to move 1200 miles from home. I always thought it would be really easy getting a job after I was all done. Well that was untrue. Obviously this will not be true with some people, they will get jobs right out of school.

Take care, Fly safe

 

P.S. I had over 300 hours in the R22 and my SFAR 73 sign off when looking for a job

Edited by Autorotator
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...