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Hey people.

 

Just a little Q about training.

 

I want to obviously complete my ppl as cheaply as possible because i really dont have a lot of money. I could probably save a bit of money by doing the ppl in the states compared to doing it here in the UK but is this the best option??

 

I mean i live at home still and im still in college and im not about to get my own place so i would be doing all of my flying locally here in the south of England (uk).

 

For this reason, would it be better to do the ppl at my local cabair in blackbushe airport? This way i learn to fly in the uk where most my flying will be done and i always learn the airport and surroundings, landmarks etc etc.

 

What do you reckon? Is the small saving worth it in the long run?

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Hey people.

 

Just a little Q about training.

 

I want to obviously complete my ppl as cheaply as possible because i really dont have a lot of money. I could probably save a bit of money by doing the ppl in the states compared to doing it here in the UK but is this the best option??

 

I mean i live at home still and im still in college and im not about to get my own place so i would be doing all of my flying locally here in the south of England (uk).

 

For this reason, would it be better to do the ppl at my local cabair in blackbushe airport? This way i learn to fly in the uk where most my flying will be done and i always learn the airport and surroundings, landmarks etc etc.

 

What do you reckon? Is the small saving worth it in the long run?

 

I think it is impossible for anyone to answer that question for you not knowing your specific circumstances. But if you approach this as a "business" decision it may help. Take out a pad of paper. On the left list out all the costs you can think of for training in the U.S. (rent, training, potential income, car, bicycle, gas, plane ticket to the U.S., visits home, food, laundry, etc--be thorough--the "hidden" expenses can add up quickly). On the right side list out all the costs you can think of for training in the U.K. Add up the two columns and there is your answer (if money is your only factor). Don't forget to keep in the back of your mind where you'd ultimately like to fly when you're finished and what you'd have to do to get your licenses transferred to that country if you end-up doing your training in the other. That might cost you too.

 

-V5

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I think it is impossible for anyone to answer that question for you not knowing your specific circumstances. But if you approach this as a "business" decision it may help. Take out a pad of paper. On the left list out all the costs you can think of for training in the U.S. (rent, training, potential income, car, bicycle, gas, plane ticket to the U.S., visits home, food, laundry, etc--be thorough--the "hidden" expenses can add up quickly). On the right side list out all the costs you can think of for training in the U.K. Add up the two columns and there is your answer (if money is your only factor). Don't forget to keep in the back of your mind where you'd ultimately like to fly when you're finished and what you'd have to do to get your licenses transferred to that country if you end-up doing your training in the other. That might cost you too.

 

-V5

Yes i think you are right. I need to really get down all the costs to every penny for it to be a sensible decision. I am not neglecting the fact that doing it in the states will cost be a fair bit in accomadation, food and all the other bits and pieces, not forgetting the plane ticket there and back :(

 

I think i need to look at it from a different point of view and put money aside for a moment. How good/bad would it be to do a JAA in the states but then return to Uk to do ALL ppl flying until im ready to do a cpl? (in terms of the difference between flying in the states and uk)

 

Or am i blowing this out of proportion and the JAA and the general flying experience in the USA going to set me up fine for UK flying?

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Sparks,

If possible, I would like to respond to your questions about training in the U.S. vs. the U.K. First of all, from my information training in the U.K. is quite limited and therefore quite expensive. In this case, training in the U.S. will be comparatively cheaper not only due to more options-competition, but also the relative savings in differences in exchange rates. However, there is a new issue post 9/11 on training in the U.S. if you are not a U.S. citizen. The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and Homeland Security Division are strictly overseeing foriegn nationals taking flight training in the U.S. This may in fact hinder smooth flying training potential. You will go through heavily extensive background checks and actually may deter you from flight training in the U.S. as a first option. Which is why I recommend possibly N.Z. I say this because as a commonwealth country, U.K. citizens enjoy considerably favorable visitor options, visas, etc. In fact, I don't think you need one for N.Z. if you are U.K. resident. You can even work in N.Z. during your training if necessary. And the final kickers? Well, you have a diverse training environment, mountains, etc. But, also and it sounds most important to you now is the huge difference in price. As the exchange rate between the U.S. dollar and N.Z. dollar is absolutely amazing, the difference between the pound and N.Z. dollar might make it a steal. It is worth looking into as the ticket price could actually be absorbed. I don't mean to deter you from training in the States, but it is a practical reality of the world we live in today.

 

Good luck.

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Sparks,

If possible, I would like to respond to your questions about training in the U.S. vs. the U.K. First of all, from my information training in the U.K. is quite limited and therefore quite expensive. In this case, training in the U.S. will be comparatively cheaper not only due to more options-competition, but also the relative savings in differences in exchange rates. However, there is a new issue post 9/11 on training in the U.S. if you are not a U.S. citizen. The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and Homeland Security Division are strictly overseeing foriegn nationals taking flight training in the U.S. This may in fact hinder smooth flying training potential. You will go through heavily extensive background checks and actually may deter you from flight training in the U.S. as a first option. Which is why I recommend possibly N.Z. I say this because as a commonwealth country, U.K. citizens enjoy considerably favorable visitor options, visas, etc. In fact, I don't think you need one for N.Z. if you are U.K. resident. You can even work in N.Z. during your training if necessary. And the final kickers? Well, you have a diverse training environment, mountains, etc. But, also and it sounds most important to you now is the huge difference in price. As the exchange rate between the U.S. dollar and N.Z. dollar is absolutely amazing, the difference between the pound and N.Z. dollar might make it a steal. It is worth looking into as the ticket price could actually be absorbed. I don't mean to deter you from training in the States, but it is a practical reality of the world we live in today.

 

Good luck.

Lasiter,

 

Thanks very much for your reply. It is quite true that my eyes are wide open at the moment and i am not afraid to look to further places as options. I would infact love to do the ppl in N.Z, a place i have always wanted to go to.

 

Can you possibly elaborate on the US background checks? I have nothing to hide and so i cant imagine why it may put me off the USA option. Im only saying this because i have a few friends there that would eliminate the accommadation costs :P

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  • 1 month later...
Lasiter,

 

Thanks very much for your reply. It is quite true that my eyes are wide open at the moment and i am not afraid to look to further places as options. I would infact love to do the ppl in N.Z, a place i have always wanted to go to.

 

Can you possibly elaborate on the US background checks? I have nothing to hide and so i cant imagine why it may put me off the USA option. Im only saying this because i have a few friends there that would eliminate the accommadation costs :P

 

 

Sparks,

Sorry for the long delay in responding to your follow-up question. I still haven't got how to track responses to my posts on the forum. As for the background checks, I actually had to provide a current U.S. passport to train in the U.S. I believe non U.S. citizens must get clearance from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security prior to training. I would before investing any time or money in a U.S. school - ask them upfront for the security clearance requirements. You do not have to pay them and no school worth their salt or even legal ones, will sell you anything prior to your clearance. Although I might be bias, but flight training in the U.S. prepares you for the overall experience and can provide you with enough background in high altitude, cold weather, hot weather, controlled airspace,etc. For me, flight training in N.Z. was an option, but you still need to get some sort of FAA clearance and further testing to fly in the U.S. upon licensing there. I have also met people who are now training here in Alaska who did a majority of training in South Africa.

 

Since my last post I have actually found out more about flying Brazil...which sounds awesome. Anyhow, I hope all goes well and that you find a school which suits your needs and your budget. Believe me, I am flying paycheck to paycheck and getting grief from friends because I am not putting money into equity like a home, etc. But, when I come back to work on Monday and say that I flew a cross country flight over glaciers and have perfect cold winter days in Alaska...I can see their envy. Believe me, flight training is expensive, but seeing their jealousy in their eyes is priceless.

 

Good luck.

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