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Have you of you guys had problems with instructors? What is the best way to handle them? I don't want to make my instructor mad because I know i will have to deal with him in the future, yet I know I am not getting where I need to be. I know I am not the only student in this position under his instruction, either. Just looking for some advice...

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You are the customer! if not for you that Instructor would not have a job!

Be polite and professional but be assertive. If there is another instructor that you would prefer then request them.

This business is like any! There are good and bad in all. That's is your choice as it is your money and your future.

There is no need to be fearful of your instructor. Those times of learning through fear are gone the wayside.

You need to enjoy your time in the air and on the ground and your learning curve will skyrocket!

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I know I am not getting where I need to be

 

Without much more information on your situation, I'll play Devil's Advocate here.

 

Question: How do you know that you are not getting where you need to be?

 

Are you an instructor?

 

Joker

 

Nuke!

 

Something about your post makes me grit my teeth. It is mainly correct and good advice I think...its just your first line.

 

Yes, the student is the customer and has a certain choice, but let's not immediately assume that the instructor is in the wrong here. (I think that is what is suggested in your first line here.)

 

There are some industries where the old adage, "The Customer Is Always Right," may work. Aviation Training is not one of them!

 

Joker

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Old-

 

You need to clearly communicate your concerns with assertiveness - be specific with what you think are areas that are problems, and also consider if you have contributed to them (be realistic and remember it takes two to tango). If most of the issues are primarily instructor related, from your perspective, discuss the training goals and expectations and the failings. If the instructor does not provide AND accept critical feedback willingly, I would be looking elsewhere, like PA Pilot wrote. My pre & post flight briefings are almost always bilateral - obviously it helps the student understand what they are progressing on and areas that will need work, but it helps the instructor adjust training tactics to get the student to standards as well as helps the instructor continue learning.

 

Another way to think about it is this is not only flight training, but survival training; what you learn - or don't learn - may ultimately bring you to end up in a situation where your bacon is over the fire. Whether you get away from the fire or become grease could be determined by the type, quality and effectiveness of your training. Keep posting & let us know how things proceed.

 

 

-WATCH FOR THE WIRES-

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Have you of you guys had problems with instructors? What is the best way to handle them? I don't want to make my instructor mad because I know i will have to deal with him in the future, yet I know I am not getting where I need to be. I know I am not the only student in this position under his instruction, either. Just looking for some advice...

 

 

Sounds like the situation I was in. I am not flying helicopters if that tells you anything. What school are you training at?

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Nuke!

Something about your post makes me grit my teeth. It is mainly correct and good advice I think...its just your first line.

 

Yes, the student is the customer and has a certain choice, but let's not immediately assume that the instructor is in the wrong here. (I think that is what is suggested in your first line here.)

 

There are some industries where the old adage, "The Customer Is Always Right," may work. Aviation Training is not one of them!

 

Joker

Joker,

I think the adage is spot on! If the student does not feel like he is getting what he needs then the Instructor needs to adjust!

No two students are alike, and Instructors need to understand that more than anything. If the student is not getting it, they will shut down and the learning curve will flatten! The reason may be the students ability or just the method the Instructor is presenting it.

The Instructor is in charge of what happens in the aircraft, no doubt about that. But the student is the one that makes the decisions with the checkbook!

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I have been in training for 8 months now. I don't wanna say the school just because I am not sure who from my school is on here and its a pretty close knit group. The problem is becoming more personal. It didnt start out as a personality conflict, but its slowly becoming one.

I guess the best thing to do is to have a serious talk with my instructor. I am ready to admit what my faults are, but I see my instructors as well. I think he is just done being an instructor and ready to move on to bigger and better things and me and the other students under this instructor are paying the price for it. Is there any hope for recovery once an instructor reaches that point? Cause we got along great in the begining and flying was going along well and now it just is making me mad. Has this happened to anyone else?

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OldBold,

 

It certainly sounds like an instructor change may be the best thing for you. Maybe not a permanent one. Sometimes just a couple of lessons with another, can help to freshen things up again. I used to call on other instructors just to sit in with my students and vice versa. It was a 'tool' that we used to keep the ball rolling when a student plateaued.

 

Also, as people have said, a good honest chat could go along way too.

 

That being said, my first post was aimed to suggest a couple of things. Here I aslo address Nuke's response.

 

Nuke, I really agree with your description of the training process (student / mentor relationship).

 

However, there are some student's who seem to never be able to function with any instructor you give them. Some students just appear to be incompatible with being trained. What to do with them?

 

Another point (relating to 'The customer is always right',) is this. Yes, the student knows best their learning style. They do not necessarily know their own progress though. How can a new student judge their own standard? The CFI is a professional, and is trained to make the decision. The danger emerges if the student BELIEVES they are further on or better than they actually are. In this case, 'The Customer is Not Right'. That's all.

 

Joker

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