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Bell 214B compared to a Super Huey


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#1 mudkow60

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Posted 15 October 2018 - 12:48

Does anyone have knowledge of the pros and cons of operating a Bell 214B compared to a Super Huey on fires?

 

Thanks!



#2 kona4breakfast

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Posted 15 October 2018 - 14:03

Temsco has had a 214B at Fairbanks for years. The fuel tanks take up most of the wells, and IIRC it has less than 2 hrs of legs. They use a basket for the cargo that would otherwise go in the wells. It does have a big ass bucket, I think around 500 gallons.


I told my mom I wanted to be a pilot when I grew up.  She told me I couldn't do both.

#3 iChris

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Posted 15 October 2018 - 16:29

Does anyone have knowledge of the pros and cons of operating a Bell 214B compared to a Super Huey on fires?

 

Thanks!

 

That’s a very broad question, you need to be more specific; however, here’s some general numbers. Also, the term “Super Huey” has been grossly misused with respect to its specific and actual configuration. You’ll need to be more specific with respect to the actual helicopter’s upgrades and engine type. 

 

The TCDS for both rate the minimum crew as 1 pilot; however, most fly the 214B with two pilots. Also the 214B gross wt. @ 13,800 requires a type rating.

 

Maximum weight 

12,500 lbs. for 214B-1 (See Note 10)
13,800 lbs. for 214B
16,000 lbs. for 214B and 214B-1 external cargo operations (See Note 4) 

 

Bell 214B / 214B-1 TCDS

 

Yn18acx.jpg


Edited by iChris, 15 October 2018 - 16:29.

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Chris

#4 mudkow60

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Posted 16 October 2018 - 11:12

Well, there is a Super Huey and Huey II... and some form in-between.  Was looking at the lifting capacity with fuel, etc.  

 

I am trying to compare it to either a +, ++, II, or the Frankenbird Hueys we fly.


Edited by mudkow60, 16 October 2018 - 11:13.


#5 iChris

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Posted 18 October 2018 - 00:18

Type II (medium) helicopters in the restricted category are basically assigned bucket or longline missions. That being the case, you going to be limited to around a 324-gallon water bucket for most of your fire work and maybe a 420-gallon working down at sea-level.  Most Bell type II ship fall within 200 - 300 pounds of each other on the load calc., so for fire, trying to compare them is largely academic.

 

The USFS Type II exclusive contracts were already awarded, link below, they were all Standard Category helicopters. The new USFS CWN contract coming soon. That’s what’s left for Restricted Category UH-1s along with some state contracts like Cal fire CWN and ODF.

 

(1) Minimum USFS Performance HOGE Standard and Restricted Category Type II 

 

Helicopters. Capability of hovering out-of-ground effect (HOGE) with a minimum 1600 pound jettisonable payload, in the following conditions: 

 

•200 lbs. for each required flight crewmember 

• 1½ hours of fuel (includes reserve). Use 7-lbs per gallon to compute weight of Jet A. 

• 5,000’ Pressure Altitude (PA) Dependent on Solicitation 

• 30°C (86ºF) Dependent on Solicitation 

 

(2) Example Bell  205A-1 working-load calculation (water bucket mission) at the same conditions:

 

8,500 Lbs. - Gross HOGE 5,000 PA@30°C

-5,200 Lbs. - BEW

-924 Lbs. - 1½ hours of fuel

-200 Lbs. - Pilot

-2,036Lbs. - 324-gallon water bucket @ 70% (226-gal x 8.33 + 154 Lbs. bucket wt.)

---------------

163 Lbs.  - Useful load remaining

 

Type I (Heavy) Helicopter: A helicopter with a certified internal gross weight of over 14,001 pounds. Under the ICS helicopter typing system, a heavy helicopter is a Type 1 helicopter and has 10 + passenger seats (unless restricted category). 

 

Type II (Medium) Helicopter: A helicopter with a certified internal gross weight between 7,001 and 14,000 pounds. Under the ICS helicopter typing system, a medium helicopter is a Type 2 helicopter and has 9 or less passenger seats (unless restricted category). 

 

Type III (Light) Helicopter: A helicopter with a certified internal gross weight of less than 7,000 pounds. Under the ICS helicopter typing system, a light helicopter is a Type 3 helicopter and has 9 or less passenger seats. 

 

Type IV (Extra Light) Helicopter: Between 2-3 passenger seats or 600 to 1,199 lbs. payload and 75 to 99 gallons retardant capacity.

 

Awarded Exclusive Use - Type II Helicopter Contracts - Initial Attack

 

National Call When Needed (CWN) Type I and II Helicopter Specifications

 

 Questions submitted and responses to upcoming National Call When Needed (CWN) Type I and II Helicopter Contract.


Edited by iChris, 18 October 2018 - 09:35.

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Chris

#6 mudkow60

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Posted 30 October 2018 - 11:10

We fly tank ships...



#7 adam32

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Posted 05 December 2018 - 17:21

The 214's "usually" fly with two pilots.

 

They aren't used much if any here in the Lower States anymore. Really popular in Australia and Alaska. 






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