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Anyone ever seen the one like that where the helicopter is using a hotel's rooftop pool to fill his bambi bucket (somewhere in Mexico or South America)?? About the third or fourth time he gets too low and sticks his TR in the fence and ends up in the pool.

 

If you ever go through Bell Helicopter's HeliProps training, you'll see it.

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Anyone ever seen the one like that where the helicopter is using a hotel's rooftop pool to fill his bambi bucket (somewhere in Mexico or South America)?? About the third or fourth time he gets too low and sticks his TR in the fence and ends up in the pool.

 

If you ever go through Bell Helicopter's HeliProps training, you'll see it.

 

Yeah, I think it was in Spain. Killed an innocent bystander with the t/r. completely unecessary and foolish. If you're going to get water from a swimming pool, have the FD send someone to keep people away.

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Yeah, I think it was in Spain. Killed an innocent bystander with the t/r. completely unecessary and foolish. If you're going to get water from a swimming pool, have the FD send someone to keep people away.

When I watched the pool usage, I thought the very same thing...danger of power lines, etc.

 

The pool in the original post looks like a pretty good candidate for doing what they are doing, but I'd agree that it would seem like a last resort vs. a lake, pond, etc.

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Yeah, I think it was in Spain. Killed an innocent bystander with the t/r. completely unecessary and foolish. If you're going to get water from a swimming pool, have the FD send someone to keep people away.

 

I think I found the clip - part of a compilation at 1:46 in: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jY8gASTk4qc&NR=1 - bad bad bad.

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I don't see the slightest problem in the video or using that pool. There's lots of space around, enough power to lift the pucket clear of surrounding opstacles before getting forward speed... Looks just fine to me.

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Although I don't see any problem taking water for a fire from a pool, obvious caution must be applied. The approach must be similar to a confined area approach. The first one certainly appeared as if the pilot had been to that pool a number of times. He certainly looked confident on his approach and departure with a bucket load of water.

 

But on the second video compilation, the B206 coming in on approach and striking his T/R on the fence was just, bad judgement. Why make the approach perpendicular to the obstacle, when he could have come in lengthwise with the pool and avoided the worse of the hazards? If he had wind to contend with, the worse he could have had was a cross wind. Just my observation.

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doesn't the chlorine in the pool make the fire worse?

 

At some point, a HIGH chlorine percentage to water solution could cause a problem. But at a few parts-per-million its not an issue. Have used pool water many times here and haven't seen any problems yet (from a ground pounders POV!)

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I wonder how long it would take for a crane to empty that pool?

 

Just a thought.

 

Later

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Lets do a little math! From the video and looking up an AS350 (just for some rough specs) and doing a half ass visual comparison, I am going to say the pool is around 20'x50'x5' avg depth (3-8'ft range).

 

20'x50x'5' = 5000 cubic feet

5000 x 7.48 (gallons in a cubic foot) = 37,400 gallons in the pool

 

37,400 gallons

----------------- = Aprox 14 drops until empty!!!!!!

2,640 gallons per drop (S-64 per Erickson Spec's)

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Lets do a little math! From the video and looking up an AS350 (just for some rough specs) and doing a half ass visual comparison, I am going to say the pool is around 20'x50'x5' avg depth (3-8'ft range).

 

20'x50x'5' = 5000 cubic feet

5000 x 7.48 (gallons in a cubic foot) = 37,400 gallons in the pool

 

37,400 gallons

----------------- = Aprox 14 drops until empty!!!!!!

2,640 gallons per drop (S-64 per Erickson Spec's)

A pool we built in AZ measured about 30 x 14 feet, and contained roughly 17,000 gallons of water.

 

A standard Arizona pool (small, kidney-bean shaped play pool) is about 12-15,000 gallons.

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