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Helicopter IFR


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Hi Everyone,

 

I had my first helicopter instrument lesson on Sunday. I managed to keep it upright and we actually did an approach.

 

The instructor said I did a good job.

 

It was interesting to say the least different than in an airplane that's for sure

 

Kandace

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Hi Everyone,

 

I had my first helicopter instrument lesson on Sunday. I managed to keep it upright and we actually did an approach.

 

The instructor said I did a good job.

 

It was interesting to say the least different than in an airplane that's for sure

 

Kandace

 

Actually Kandace, in many ways FW and RW IFR are the same. Except for approach minimums, fuel reserves and the fact that altitude is controlled more by the collective, the procedures are pretty much the same. Some helicopter pilots prefer to use the 80/260 for course reversal instead of the teardrop or the depicted course reversal. But there is nothing in the regulations that restrict how you do the course reversal. Circling approaches for the most part are something you will not do. If the wind was really howling and the terrain is such you thought there was the possibility of unsafe wind conditions, I would consider circling. Plus there are helicopter only approaches and the new fun one PinS (Point in Space) approaches.

 

Have fun.

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Actually Kandace, in many ways FW and RW IFR are the same.

 

Have fun.

 

Thank you for the response, I appreciate it! I was actually referring to the fact that the helicopter requires constant attention where the airplanes will continue to fly at least for a bit while you attend to charts and such.

 

Kandace

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Use your Instructor as an Autopilot. This is not uncommon. Since you'll be required to have one should you be Single Pilot IFR anyway. Of course you'd have to say "autopilot on" and what you want it to do. IE: hold heading, altitude ect...

 

 

 

JD

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Use your "autopilot". Heck, you'll even need it on your checkride, so get used to telling your instructor "autopilot on... altitude 2400, heading 360, speed 70 knots" or whatever you want at that moment.

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Use your "autopilot". Heck, you'll even need it on your checkride, so get used to telling your instructor "autopilot on... altitude 2400, heading 360, speed 70 knots" or whatever you want at that moment.

Just remember that most autopilots don't work that well. They will kill you if you don't pay attention. If it's not a full 4-axis autopilot/flight director, you have to make sure the power setting is correct. Engaging altitude control or airspeed control (you can't use both at the same time unless it's a 4-axis controller) with too little power will eventually result in a loss of control. I've seen it happen in the sim. Autopilots are not smart, they only know one way of controlling a parameter, and will attempt to control it right up to the crash. Never rely completely on any autopilot, you have to keep an eye on the instruments no matter what else is going on. That applies especially to a breathing autopilot. I know whereof I speak.

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Very true, Gomer. My "autopilot" when I was doing instrument was almost guaranteed to be defective, and always at the least convenient time.

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