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medical question


Fred0311
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I returned from a combat deployment this year and have moderate PTSD. I know this sounds bad but I was prescribed anti depressants for there anti anxiety properties. This isnt controlling my life but I needed help with it, however I dont plan on taking them when I get out of the military to pursue my flight training. My question is though will having been on them at all prevent me from flying? I understand this may ellicit some response of "are you sure you should be flying?" or "are you sure you should stop taking them?" Take my word I'll be alright.

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You'll have to see what the Aviation Medical Examiner (AME) will say when you go to do your flight physical. I'm not sure how it works if you're prescribed something, but not taking it. I would be willing to say its a no go though. You might have to cancel out your prescriptions in order for them to clear you. Don't take my word for it though. Good luck!

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Fred0311,

 

First, welcome home! And welcome to the forum. I had to appeal my medical because of a med I was on for headaches. The main thing to know with meds is that they want you to have been free of them for at least 90 days. At least with my case it was, so if you are able to get off of them right away, I would do that. They are also going to want to see evidence from the prescribing doc that you are off of them. It will be much easier to start gathering this proof now, as opposed to when you are out. You know how hard it will be to get it once you are no longer in the service.

 

Another option is to go to the FAA website. Find the list of "approved medications". There may be something on there that you can switch to if the med you are on now is on the "not approved" list. You will find a list of both "approved" and "not approved" meds at the same place.

 

If you cannot get completely off of them at this time, I suggest you go the route of switching to something right away.

 

Hope this helped, and best of luck brother!

 

Whiteshadow

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Was I you, I'd find an AME who will talk to you about your situation. I'd make at least the initial consultation a non-aviation medical certificate visit. Don't complete the FAA aviation medical form until you have had professional advice, either from an AME who's familiar with the process or other expert.

 

To your point, a quote from the AOPA site:

 

"Special Issuance Certification for Depression with Antidepressant Usage

 

Effective April 5, 2010, the FAA began considering individuals for special issuance medical certification who are being treated for depression with one of four specific antidepressant medications. All classes of medical certification will be considered, but individuals who are granted a special-issuance medical certificate under this policy may take only one type of antidepressant medication limited to the following four medications: Fluoxetine (Prozac), Sertraline (Zoloft), Citalopram (Celexa), or Escitalopram (Lexapro). All these medications are SSRIs, antidepressants that help restore the balance of serotonin, a naturally occurring chemical substance found in the brain."

 

One vet to another- Thank you, and welcome home.

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Was I you, I'd find an AME who will talk to you about your situation. I'd make at least the initial consultation a non-aviation medical certificate visit. Don't complete the FAA aviation medical form until you have had professional advice, either from an AME who's familiar with the process or other expert.

 

 

Now that is some great advice, I wish I had done that myself!

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You also can contact the office of your regional FAA flight surgeon and just ask questions free of charge.

I don't know where you are located, but here is a list with links to the various offices around the country:

 

http://www.faa.gov/licenses_certificates/medical_certification/rfs/

 

I live in the Pacific Northwest, and I encountered a hick-up in my medical and the regional FAA flight surgeon was able

to help me solve the issue I had. Before that I had dealt with Oklahoma City direct and that was a very slow and frustrating experience.

 

Best of luck to you! And remember, where there is a will to fly, there is way to make it happen.

 

cheers,

 

Swisster

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  • 2 months later...

The FAA doesn't approve or disapprove medications, although certain classes of drugs do prohibit receiving a medical certificate. The FAA operates on a case-by-case basis, and it's the condition for which the drug is prescribed, as well as the effects of the drug, which are considered.

 

Don't go to any AME. You should work with one who had experience handling special issuance medicals and medicals with complications. One I can recommend is myflightsurgeon.com.

 

If you're not a member of the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association, I recommend you join, and avail yourself of their services when it comes to seeking your medical.

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