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Quick Question


txflyer
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Hey guys, I am just starting my instrument and commercial rating and have a quick Q. When I am building hours for my commercial rating, is there a problem with taking up passengers with me? I know I cannot fly for hire, and can't be compensated more than their share of airport fees, fuel, etc.

 

Thank You All

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Take all the passengers you can. Enjoy the freedom and responsibility that comes with it ! Enjoy & have fun showing off your newly learned skill.

 

Remember to pay attention to whats going on aroung you, and alwats fly the helicopter first. Keep it safe !!!

 

Keith

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always fly the helicopter first. Keep it safe !!!

 

Keith

 

 

Very important to remember. Enjoy your private rating. You earned it, but be careful not to get excited or let your non-aviation friends distract you with curiosity when it's important. Don't forget the pax brief even if it feels stupid to be telling your friend or parents what to do. Most of all though have fun.

Edited by rotormandan
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If your school will let you take somebody up do it. As with a lot of things in this country, the insurance companies make this call. I have clients who are Private Pilots and their insurance (Pathfinder or Domestic) will not let them carry passengers until they have 200hrs.

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I got to wondering whilst reading this thread, are we too cautious when interpreting rules or seeking clarification from administrators or operators?

 

Just wonderin'.

 

Later

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Of course you can take passengers, but don't forget to get the additional 10 hours solo for your

commercial. I have said in the past (wrongly) that the solo time for your private is enough. It's

not according to a clarification letter I read from the FAA. Some examiners and DPE's are not

aware of this.

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Of course you can take passengers, but don't forget to get the additional 10 hours solo for your

commercial. I have said in the past (wrongly) that the solo time for your private is enough. It's

not according to a clarification letter I read from the FAA. Some examiners and DPE's are not

aware of this.

Can you post a link or the letter for us?

 

Jerry

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From fltpro

 

As a result of Mr. Tucker’s query to FAA Headquarters (AFS-800) on this issue in the Part 61 FAQ’s, the following was posted on the FAA’s web site. Nothing has changed since then: "Question 1: Ref. §61.129©(4); Does the aeronautical experience requirement for “. . . 10 hours of solo flight in a helicopter on the areas of operation listed in §61.127(B)(3) of this part . . .” have to be accomplished after the applicant first holds a private pilot certificate? Or can the aeronautical experience earned as a student pilot be credited for meeting this requirement? Answer 1: That aeronautical experience [i.e., “. . . 10 hours of solo flight in a helicopter on the areas of operation listed in §61.127(B)(3) of this part . . .” ] has to be earned while the applicant is seeking commercial pilot certification and the applicant must first hold at least a Private Pilot Certificate. As the rule [i.e., §61.129©(4)] states, it has to be “. . . on the areas of operation listed in §61.127(B)(3) of this part . . .” Otherwise, AT THE COMMERCIAL PILOT LEVEL. The answer is no, this aeronautical experience cannot be earned during the student pilot level. Question 2: The situation is I have an applicant who is seeking a Commercial Pilot Certificate-Helicopter rating via §61.123. The applicant accomplished his Private Pilot Certificate-Helicopter under a Part 141 approved training program. Therefore, what is the minimum solo time required to be shown on the FAA Form 8710 1 for accomplishing a Commercial Pilot Certificate-Helicopter rating when the applicant initially completed the Private Pilot Certificate- Helicopter rating under a Part 141 approved training program? Answer 2: Ref. §61.129©(4) and Part 141, Appendix B, paragraph 5.©; The answer is 15 hours of solo time. As per Part 141, Appendix B, paragraph 5.©, requires a minimum of “. . . 5 hours of solo flight training in a helicopter on the approved areas of operation in paragraph (d)(3) of section No. 4 of this appendix . . .” and as per §61.129©(4), requires a minimum of “. . . 10 hours of solo flight in a helicopter on the areas of operation listed in §61.127(B)(3) of this part . . .” However, this minimum solo time requirement may be less because keep in mind the provisions of §141.55(d) and (e), which state, in pertinent part, “. . . approval for a period of not more than 24 calendar months for any of the training courses of this part without specifying the minimum ground and flight training time requirements of this part . . .” So if a Part 141 school has been approved for a reduced course time approval under §141.55(d) and (e), the total solo hours may be less. In these cases, it would be prudent (and HIGHLY RECOMMENDED) of the examiner to attach a note on the application to highlight this difference to the Airman Certification Branch, AFS-763, in Oklahoma City who process the application and issue the pilot certificates. Question 3: The situation is I have an applicant who is seeking a Commercial Pilot Certificate-Helicopter rating via §61.123. The applicant accomplished his Private Pilot Certificate-Helicopter under a non approved training program. Therefore, what is the minimum solo time required to be shown on the FAA Form 8710 1 for accomplishing a Commercial Pilot Certificate-Helicopter rating? Answer 3: Ref. §61.129©(4) and §61.109©(4); The answer is 20 hours of solo time. As per §61.109©(4) requires a minimum of “. . . 10 hours of solo flight time in a helicopter, consisting of at least . . .” and as per §61.129©(4), requires a minimum of “. . . 10 hours of solo flight in a helicopter on the areas of operation listed in §61.127(B)(3) of this part . . .” So the answer is a total of 20 hours of solo time. Inquiry from: Tim Tucker, Pilot Examiner, Torrance, CA Answered by: John Lynch, AFS-840 Q&A-234" This guidance remained on the FAA’s web site until the Part 61 FAQ’s were pulled in November, 2005. However, FAA ASI’s and DPE’s have have followed this guidance ever since it was published. Please note the Director of Flight Standards Headquarters (AFS-1’s) March 31, 2006 memo to all Flight Standards Headquarters and Regional Division Managers, where he stated: “… Henceforth, the answers provided in the Part 61 and 141 "FAQ" files are not to be considered official Flight Standards policy without first receiving verification from the General Aviation and Commercial Division, AFS 800. … “…The public will address their questions to the appropriate field office. Inquiries that cannot be answered within the Flight Standards District Office will be elevated to the regional Flight Standards office. If, at that point, an answer still cannot be provided, the regional office may contact headquarters for resolution.” Some time after the above Part 61 FAQ was published, the AFS-640 Pilot Examiner Standardization Recurrent Course instructors discussed this requirement in our training and I even remember mention about it in a slide in their PowerPoint presentation, since it is equally applicable to airplane Commercial (SEL) solo requirements. It is still well settled by AFS-760 and AFS-800 that the 10 hours of solo flight time required by Part 61.129 is required to be accomplished after Private Pilot certification. Moreover, I would like to draw your attention to a document titled “Aeronautical Experience Checklist” (aero-exp.doc) currently on the AFS-800 web site that outlines the flight time requirements for certificates and ratings. This document may be currently found on the FAA’s web site at: www.faa.gov/about/office_org/headquarters_offices/avs/offices/afs/afs800/afs810/checklist/media/aero-exp.doc Please take note of the “Commercial Pilot Certification” section of that document, especially “Note 2.” A quick perusal of that document will show that, at least according to that document, evidently the FAA still requires a minimum of 10 hours of post-Private solo flight time to qualify for a Commercial Pilot Certificate. And solo means just that: sole occupant of the aircraft. Except for those airmen who have obtained their Private Certification (helicopter) in a Part 141 program (5 solo permitted), any 8710 submitted for commercial certification with less than 20 hors of solo will be returned by AFS-760 as unqualified. Tailwinds, Antique Examiner

Edited by IFLYEVERYTHING
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