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Ferry Route for R22 Calif to Fla any recommendations?


shb47
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The safest thing to do would be to have someone else come with you if you aren't already.

 

I also take it you are coming out of Torrance? If so just get a helicopter route chart for Los Angeles. Follow the 110 North to the 91 East to the 710 North to the 60 East. The 60 will meet up with the 10 East near Banning Pass. Now, just follow the 10 all the way to Buckeye,AZ(located East of Phoenix). Then direct to Tucson,AZ. Halfway to Tucson you'll pick up the 10 again. Follow the 10 East all the way to FL.

 

Just do your flight planning very well. Be conservative with fuel and weather.

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I can't believe all the useful info I'm getting here!

 

You should probably check this, but...a Cfi once told me that the R22 can run off automotive gas? :huh: So, if true, I would stick to the freeway, just in case you missjudge a fuel stop. :unsure:

 

I've only flown to Arizona on I-10 (from L.A.), but I've driven at least half the distance on I-40, and I can say, there's not a whole lot to see up there ^_^ , so stick to I-10, (you probably won't have to climb as high either)? Of course if its not too far out of your way, definitly stop in Vegas! :lol:

 

And remember, if you get lost (along the freeway), you can just dive down and check out a road sign. I actually did that once! :blink:

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The safest thing to do would be to have someone else come with you if you aren't already.

 

I also take it you are coming out of Torrance? If so just get a helicopter route chart for Los Angeles. Follow the 110 North to the 91 East to the 710 North to the 60 East. The 60 will meet up with the 10 East near Banning Pass. Now, just follow the 10 all the way to Buckeye,AZ(located East of Phoenix). Then direct to Tucson,AZ. Halfway to Tucson you'll pick up the 10 again. Follow the 10 East all the way to FL.

 

Just do your flight planning very well. Be conservative with fuel and weather.

 

Thanks for the info. If I take someone with me, I'll need a fuel stop every 100 miles.

 

I once flew a Cessna 120 through the Banning Pass going east - it was one of those Santa Ana Wind days and my groundspeed was around 30 kt.

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You should probably check this, but...a Cfi once told me that the R22 can run off automotive gas? :huh: So, if true, I would stick to the freeway, just in case you missjudge a fuel stop. :unsure:

 

I've only flown to Arizona on I-10 (from L.A.), but I've driven at least half the distance on I-40, and I can say, there's not a whole lot to see up there ^_^ , so stick to I-10, (you probably won't have to climb as high either)? Of course if its not too far out of your way, definitly stop in Vegas! :lol:

 

And remember, if you get lost (along the freeway), you can just dive down and check out a road sign. I actually did that once! :blink:

 

There is an STC for running mogas in the R22. Doing so without the STC is illegal and, most important, could void insurance in the event of a problem.

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If you're coming out of torrence, I'm assuming you're getting a bird from the factory.

Does Robinson still have their big list of requirements as to pilot qualifications for leaving in their aircraft?

And do you meet them?

 

Just mentioning it from hearing the stories of owners not being allowed to leave with their new aircraft.

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If you're coming out of torrence, I'm assuming you're getting a bird from the factory.

Does Robinson still have their big list of requirements as to pilot qualifications for leaving in their aircraft?

And do you meet them?

 

Just mentioning it from hearing the stories of owners not being allowed to leave with their new aircraft.

 

True about requirements. I'm not coming from the factory.

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Like JD said, follow I-60 or I-10 east. Leave before dawn and do that first hour in the dark, you don't want to be in the pass in the heat of the day, nor do you want to be in the desert in the thermals. Robinson will not even allow east bound flights during the summer, and there is a reason for it!

 

While I understand that you are not ferrying a ship from the factory, you may still want to compare Robinsons requirements with your own.

 

Here's a link if you haven't seen it.

 

http://www.robinsonheli.com/pdf_files/ferrying.pdf

 

Plenty of female pilots out there in that 100 pound range that would not hurt your ability to carry full fuel. Unless you are a really big guy like some of us...

 

Fly safe, land often, I would be on the ground by 11am.

 

Goldy

 

Just noticed your in Florida. Most of the Class B is 1500 feet AGL min. over LA unless you get in close to LAX. LA ships use 123.02 exclusively now, even around the LA Harbor area. If you have any questions about local procedures in the LA area, just send me a PM or post it.

Edited by Goldy
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Fly safe, land often, I would be on the ground by 11am.

 

Ground by 11am? How many weeks is this trip going to take?

 

Plenty of female pilots out there in that 100 pound range that would not hurt your ability to carry full fuel. Unless you are a really big guy like some of us...

 

If you have a wife that wouldn't object to a multi-day trip with a 100 lb fermale, then I envy you.

 

Seriously, thanks for the info. I've made the trip in airplanes (low and day VFR, just like the helos), but my range capabilities were a lot better. Just want to pick some rotorbrains because it's a different trip in a Robbie.

Edited by shb47
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Ground by 11am? How many weeks is this trip going to take?

 

 

If you have a wife that wouldn't object to a multi-day trip with a 100 lb fermale, then I envy you.

 

Seriously, thanks for the info. I've made the trip in airplanes (low and day VFR, just like the helos), but my range capabilities were a lot better. Just want to pick some rotorbrains because it's a different trip in a Robbie.

 

Sorry, I was really just speaking of the Mojave desert and Banning Pass areas, try not to be there in the afternoon. As far as the girl pilot, she probably wouldnt like it, but you do what you have to do!

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If anybody has specific recommendations re fuel stops and layovers, please post. For instance, any known FBOs who are likely to provide hangar space overnight? I'm sure there are some (or many) typical preferred stops for Robbie ferry flights.

 

I'm not trying to outsource my flight planning - just looking for "common knowledge" from those who have done it.

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You're typically not going to be buying enough fuel to justify hangar space overnight. They save that for the big boys buying hundreds of gallons of Jet A. Bring your tiedowns.

 

I didn't mean FREE hangar space. Doesn't take a very big TRW to trash a Robbie.

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I have flown this route a few times, once in a 22. I was headed west however. The major area of concern in regards to fuel was the area along I-10 in West Texas. Get as much fuel in El Paso as you can (within limitations of course). I stayed in Fort Stockton one night. Everyone there was very helpful and hanger space was easy to get. After West Texas you should be able to pick and choose your stops much easier. Good Luck!

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I agree with J.Grant - west Texas will be your biggest problem. Not only are the airports inconveniently spaced, not all of the airports will necessarily have avgas as well... regardless of what the guide says. Be sure and call ahead to ensure that there'll be fuel and some way to purchase it.

 

Also like J.Grant, I was headed westbound as well, albeit in a Schweizer, and our departure point was in New Jersey. I'll send you a PM with a link to a Google Map showing the various airports we landed. You may want to consider sticking with I-20 rather than risk the gulf coastal weather along I-10. Distance-wise, it's not going to be that much different.

 

Best of luck to you. I'm sure that this will be a flight you will remember for quite some time. I've done coast-to-coast in a fixed wing as well, but it doesn't begin to compare to what you will see from the cockpit of a helicopter.

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