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Transitioning ATL's Class B


RotorRunner
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I am planning a night crosscountry from 47A to FFC. This will put me flying right through the heart of ATL's Class B. Anybody have a lot of experience with this, that would like to share some words of wisdom? Thanks!

 

I havent looked at a chart, but isnt there a N/S VFR corridor running across ATL?

 

Most Class B's have multiple VFR corridors and some have designated helo routes. Sorry I don't fly in that end of the world much.

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I havent looked at a chart, but isnt there a N/S VFR corridor running across ATL?

 

Most Class B's have multiple VFR corridors and some have designated helo routes. Sorry I don't fly in that end of the world much.

 

Goldy,

 

Thanks for your response. I have studied the TAC chart and sectional and I do not see any VFR corridor.

 

Once again, THANKS!

 

RR

Edited by RotorRunner
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Goldy,

 

Thanks for your response. I have studied the TAC chart and sectional and I do not see any VFR corridor.

 

Once again, THANKS!

 

RR

 

 

I think ATL doesn't have a VFR corridor. If it were me I'd just give ATL ATC a quick phone call and ask them how they would like you to transition in a helicopter. Or just file a flight plan and request flight following.

 

 

Who you flying with out of 47a? Sharp Mountain Aviation?

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No, ATL doesn't have a charted route. They cooperate as much as they can and still keep the traffic moving, but you will be vectored and have altitude restrictions. The process works better if you're familiar with the airport layout, main terminal, runways, etc.

I have a personal- perhaps irrational- inclination to avoid operating around airport traffic. If there's a reasonable possibility of vectors, I'll route around the problem as early as possible, that adds minimal delay. A direct course would route you through MGE, FFC and ATL, for 57.6 nm. Circumnavigate RYY on the NW side and then direct, it's 61.9 nm, an extra 2-3 minutes but far less hassle and exposure. Me, I'd probably plan direct to a point West of ATL the put me comfortably clear of heavy arrival and departure traffic, and opt for a transition through the B if traffic wasn't bad. You can see ATL traffic if vis is good; and if it isn't, I'm definitely going around.

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I have not seen too many VFR corridors, and even if Atlanta had one, I wouldn't use it unless I had a very good idea of where it was or would first go with somebody else who has used it before. Busting a Bravo will really screw up your day. I enjoy going through class Bravo because it's kind of challenging and interesting. Call the tower 15 miles out and see what they say. If it's after 8-9 PM they may let you go right through with few instructions or often they will send you up to around 3500 and have you go straight over the top. If you are a lower time pilot, or like me, go into a Bravo once in a blue moon, it's good practice and you will learn something. All Bravos treat helicopters and VFR traffic a little different, but the worst that can happen is they'll just make you go around. Of, course you have to be vigilant, but going through a Bravo at night would have to rank very low for a collision risk, IMO. On initial call up get ready to write down your code. I always forget to have a pen handy.

Edited by helonorth
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I think ATL doesn't have a VFR corridor. If it were me I'd just give ATL ATC a quick phone call and ask them how they would like you to transition in a helicopter. Or just file a flight plan and request flight following.

 

 

Who you flying with out of 47a? Sharp Mountain Aviation?

 

Redhawk,

 

I have been emailing them. They have been very helpful.

 

Thanks,

RR

Edited by RotorRunner
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No, ATL doesn't have a charted route. They cooperate as much as they can and still keep the traffic moving, but you will be vectored and have altitude restrictions. The process works better if you're familiar with the airport layout, main terminal, runways, etc.

I have a personal- perhaps irrational- inclination to avoid operating around airport traffic. If there's a reasonable possibility of vectors, I'll route around the problem as early as possible, that adds minimal delay. A direct course would route you through MGE, FFC and ATL, for 57.6 nm. Circumnavigate RYY on the NW side and then direct, it's 61.9 nm, an extra 2-3 minutes but far less hassle and exposure. Me, I'd probably plan direct to a point West of ATL the put me comfortably clear of heavy arrival and departure traffic, and opt for a transition through the B if traffic wasn't bad. You can see ATL traffic if vis is good; and if it isn't, I'm definitely going around.

 

Wally,

 

I know what you mean, but part of it is just to have the experience and to learn more about dealing with situations like this. Then I will know how bad I should avoid them.

 

Thanks,

RR

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I have not seen too many VFR corridors, and even if Atlanta had one, I wouldn't use it unless I had a very good idea of where it was or would first go with somebody else who has used it before. Busting a Bravo will really screw up your day. I enjoy going through class Bravo because it's kind of challenging and interesting. Call the tower 15 miles out and see what they say. If it's after 8-9 PM they may let you go right through with few instructions or often they will send you up to around 3500 and have you go straight over the top. If you are a lower time pilot, or like me, go into a Bravo once in a blue moon, it's good practice and you will learn something. All Bravos treat helicopters and VFR traffic a little different, but the worst that can happen is they'll just make you go around. Of, course you have to be vigilant, but going through a Bravo at night would have to rank very low for a collision risk, IMO. On initial call up get ready to write down your code. I always forget to have a pen handy.

 

Helonorth,

 

You are exactly correct. I want the experience.

 

Thanks for your response!

 

RR

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Looks like an interesting flight coming up for you, last time I tried to overfly Phoenix my radio didn't work very well and was told to go around and stay under their airspace.

 

After your flight let us know how they vectored you through or around ATL.

 

Jerry

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You might consider contacting a ATL local operator to get the skinny on what to expect. Preplanning will make all the difference.

He's just going through a Bravo, not going to the moon. Either he will hear the magic words "cleared into the Bravo airspace" assigned an altitude to stay below, a code and given some headings, or he won't. It ain't that complicated. If they aren't very busy, ATC will bend over backward to help you if you have a question. And if they are busy, they probably won't let you in. The dudes a rated pilot, it won't be anything he cannot handle. The Bravo isn't really different than any other tower controlled airspace except you really have to pay attention to the radio. They can talk really fast. Other than a frequency (tower works 99% of the time) not much to prepare. Call them up, tell them what you want to do and then do what they tell you to do.

Edited by helonorth
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He's just going through a Bravo, not going to the moon. Either he will hear the magic words "cleared into the Bravo airspace" assigned an altitude to stay below, a code and given some headings, or he won't. It ain't that complicated. If they aren't very busy, ATC will bend over backward to help you if you have a question. And if they are busy, they probably won't let you in. The dudes a rated pilot, it won't be anything he cannot handle. The Bravo isn't really different than any other tower controlled airspace except you really have to pay attention to the radio. They can talk really fast. Other than a frequency (tower works 99% of the time) not much to prepare. Call them up, tell them what you want to do and then do what they tell you to do.

 

It may not be going to the moon for you and me, but the kid came here looking for help with this specific airspace. Just telling him to contact ATC and blast away is not always the best way to do things and if you read the replies, no one gave specific advice regarding ATL. Do you have any experience with ATL? If you do, why dont you offer up some specifics? If you dont, why dont you offer some suggestions of how to make it easier for him to transition this unfamiliar airspace? If someone asked me about my local class B, I could give them a ton of insider info. IMO, simply suggesting to call the ATC and see what happens is rather shallow advice for a rated guy or not. If it was that simple, why did he come here looking for the advice in the first place? And, since he is rated, dont you think he knows he can just contact ATC and comply.....

Edited by Spike
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Guys,

 

Thanks for all the comments. I am not a kid, but an "over the hill", starting to turn gray, CFI. I have just never transitioned this particular Class B. I emailed ATL's TRACON and they hooked me up with very detailed information on their procedures for handling helicopter traffic transitioning North-South and back. Those guys were extremely friendly and helpful. Thanks again for everyones comments and help.

 

Thanks,

RR

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Guys,

 

Thanks for all the comments. I am not a kid, but an "over the hill", starting to turn gray, CFI. I have just never transitioned this particular Class B. I emailed ATL's TRACON and they hooked me up with very detailed information on their procedures for handling helicopter traffic transitioning North-South and back. Those guys were extremely friendly and helpful. Thanks again for everyones comments and help.

 

Thanks,

RR

 

Maybe post some of those transitions for some of the other guys that may fly thru there now and then....but were afraid to ask!

 

Have a great flight.

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  • 1 year later...

Here is a video we did of getting in and out of Bravo airspace here in Salt Lake City. We use it as a training tool for our students to get familiar with the procedures and steps of getting in and out of Bravo airspace. Here is the link

 

 

Let me know what you guys think.

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