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Manual Throttle in the OH58D. We have FADEC that controls it normally, but when it fails, we only have an NP overspeed protection. So we spend a couple of weeks training manual throttle.

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Manual fuel in a what? A Huey?

 

We flew Hueys in manual throttle before solo at 11 hours - it wasn't all that difficult if you lead with throttle : throttle up, lever up; throttle down. lever down.

If you use the collective slowly enough going up, you can lead with collective. Putting the collective down requires leading with throttle reduction as overspeeds are more problematic than underspeeds of the same magnitude.

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Flying a turbine in manual throttle requires being ahead of the aircraft all the time. With a FADEC, or even just an analog governor, you can get by much of the time being just even with the aircraft, or even behind it for awhile. And lots of pilots I've flown with tend to stay just about even, and some are behind it almost all the time. That won't work in manual throttle. Like hovering, you have to see what the aircraft is going to do before it does it, and make the appropriate correction in advance. If you stay ahead of the aircraft, it's not so hard. Get behind, and you'll have problems.

Edited by Gomer Pylot
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Flying a turbine in manual throttle requires being ahead of the aircraft all the time. With a FADEC, or even just an analog governor, you can get by much of the time being just even with the aircraft, or even behind it for awhile. And lots of pilots I've flown with tend to stay just about even, and some are behind it almost all the time. That won't work in manual throttle. Like hovering, you have to see what the aircraft is going to do before it does it, and make the appropriate correction in advance. If you stay ahead of the aircraft, it's not so hard. Get behind, and you'll have problems.

 

This raised a question that I thought about for a while today on my drive...

 

How does one know where they are in relation to the aircraft?

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This raised a question that I thought about for a while today on my drive...

 

How does one know where they are in relation to the aircraft?

The art of Zen flying. Or you can just assume your relation to the aircraft. If you have any air sense at all, your flying touch will confirm your assumption, or update it.

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This raised a question that I thought about for a while today on my drive...

 

How does one know where they are in relation to the aircraft?

 

Scan-1-5.jpg

 

The above is from an old Army Field Manual (FM 1-51)

 

You’ll know you’re starting to get behind when current situations and aircraft actions start coming as a surprise. If you fall further behind, you’ll become overwhelmed by the oncoming situations and the actions of the aircraft. At that point, the aircraft will be flying you, and you’ll find yourself consistently reacting.

 

When you’re ahead of the aircraft and in full control, the opposite is true; your actions cause the aircraft to react to a situation you create. Staying ahead requires knowledge, preplanning before the flight, the ability to project, and predict the likely outcome of your mission based on that knowledge and preplanning.

 

Flying manual throttle seems challenging because some haven’t mastered that 95% (will come with experience). The new guys seem to always work from the 5% side of the equation.

Edited by iChris
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If you're ahead of the aircraft, you always know what it's going to do, and you make it do what you want, making control movements before they seem to be necessary. If you're behind it, things happen you didn't see coming, and you keep getting surprised. You need to be thinking several seconds ahead, and not just reacting to events. That takes experience as well as planning, and concentration on your flying, not just lollygagging along. Everyone gets behind now and then, but it's not a good place to be, and you need to be able to recognize when you're behind, and make an effort to catch up. Some people just never seem to be able to recognize it.

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I agree with

Gomer Pylot

 

The hands on stuff is just eye hand coordination, and muscle memory. Anyone with a modicum of coordination can learn that. Most of the rest of it is knowing what to do, and when to do it. The final ingredient is judgement, ADM, wisdom, or having a good idea how to handle a situation you have never experienced.

Edited by aeroscout
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This raised a question that I thought about for a while today on my drive...

 

How does one know where they are in relation to the aircraft?

If you have to ask or you don't know, you are probably behind the aircraft! LOL

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If you have to ask or you don't know, you are probably behind the aircraft! LOL

 

Haha... I knew that would come up. As my own worst critic, I hardly think I'm a good judge, though. I can only make assumptions that I'm doing alright if all the people who've signed off on me to this point are letting me do what I do.

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