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What's more valuable??


BigBird7
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I'd like to hear your opinion!

 

As a CFII searching for that initial job,

 

would you rather have long line and high altitude experience on your resume with maybe 65-70 PIC R44II hours?

 

or

 

100 hours PIC R44II and no long line or high altitude training/endorsements?

 

 

What's more valuable for that initial CFII spot?

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I'd stick go with as much 44 time as you can acquire. If you've already got a fair bit of 22 and 44 time, depending on the school you're trying to get into you might want to consider some 300 time as well. Having all of that would make you as marketable as possible IMO.

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I'd like to hear your opinion!

 

As a CFII searching for that initial job,

 

would you rather have long line and high altitude experience on your resume with maybe 65-70 PIC R44II hours?

 

or

 

100 hours PIC R44II and no long line or high altitude training/endorsements?

 

 

What's more valuable for that initial CFII spot?

 

Not really enough info to respond. If you don't have 300 hours PIC TT, then do whatever you can do or need to do to get that first. If you already have it, then get as much R44 time as you can up to maybe 100 or so hours. Get your Safety course and endorsement to teach in the 22/44. Remember you can get R44 time pretty cheap flying second seat on tours and such.

 

I think over 5K DA time is more important than a long line 10 hours. You're a better pilot flying regularly at high altitude and you can always come down and teach at sea level......but not the other way around. Most of my flying is done from 300 to 800 MSL, not real tough, and easy to pick up and keep bad habits. Besides, flying an R44 cost the same regardless of altitude, so why not pick up some high DA time for the same price?

 

You're going to be teaching, not running a 100' line as your first job. Some schools require high DA experience, none of them require long line to start.

 

My thoughts, fly safe,

 

Goldy

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I’m with Jimbo… Neither.

 

In my opinion, you’re over thinking this.

 

The altitude stuff is beneficial if you believe you can compete with other CFII’s who’ve earned their CFII certification in that environment, meaning; you’d need to bring something else of higher value to the table to compete with those guys. The Vref stuff is a no brainer, meaning no value whatsoever.

 

For initial CFII maximum marketability, you should concentrate on meeting the Robinson SFAR requirement for both R models and proficiency in the S300. Any additional time spent in the R44 beyond the minimum SFAR requirement is a waste of money. Truthfully, there is little to no difference between the R44 scenarios you provided. If you’re proficient in the machine, then you’re proficient in the machine…… The added peripheral fluff if just that, fluff…..

 

Earn the CFII certification as suggested above and after that, spend all of your extra cash on finding a job. Sadly yes, it takes money to find a job. Many will attest, the worst place a CFII can find himself in is, broke and no job. Don’t be that guy……..

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Thanks for the insightful replies! The reason I ask is, I need hours to meet requirements for my commercial. So I have to spend the money on something. Getting those hours in the 44 would be at half price than the usual wet charge. So I would be saving money by doing it that way. But, I wasn't sure if long line and high altitude training would help me more in the long run. All of your comments are helpful. Thank you.

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Just get hours the cheapest way you can if your building for your commercial. If you can have some fun beyond flying straight and level watching the Hobbs tick over, do that. But at this point, dont "overspend" on training that your not going to use for probably a few years ie. long line training. I am in a weird position that I am a CFI but I only have about 15 hrs in a Robinson. All of my time is mainly in the 500E and about 60 in the 300. No flight schools in my area have 300s. I would love to teach on the side but all the local schools have R22s. So now have to pimp myself out for free to build my Robbie time doing ferry or frost control jobs until I can get the 50hrs I need.

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