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tip jet flying?


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Imagine doing auto's in that... tail-strike-be-gone

 

Hmm, I wanna see that video, wonder how it handles? I'm thinking it is a pretty low inertia rotor system. But yeah, no boom to chop or TR to stick in the ground, that's a plus.

 

Rudder pedals in a heli, that should be nice for a dual rated pilot.. less correction by peers and more correction of peers. B)

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gary-mike

 

My felling for a No of years did you read the whole site regarding investment & share dealing ? + $2m investor.

Still was wrong about the thing never flying, and it being a SS style thing.

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I did read a few of the news letters they had in there, looks like they have gained some interest but still in the very early stages of getting started.

 

They also said it was going to be cheap, Frank said the same thing. Well I'm an average income American and I still can't afford a R-22 Frank.

Edited by gary-mike
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Hi to all members and website creator. Good website and a good forum.

Would love to ask this forum, is it possible to find some one or how to go about finding a designer or a engineer who could help us directing in to right direction on how to design a APJ TipJet or a no torque Rotorcraft like VilJet or Pegasusheli.com. Any help is Appreciated. Thanks my email address is TIPJETHELI@gmail.com

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I wonder if it will have a H/V diagram. If its a very high inertia rotor you may be able to autorotate from any speed/altitude combination, thoughts? Also I remember my flight instructor telling me that Bell built an experimental 206L LongRanger with massive weights built into the rotor such that the helicopter had NO low airspeed HV curve. It could autorotate to a safe landing from any combination of altitude and airspeed. I always thought that was interesting.

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I wonder if it will have a H/V diagram. If its a very high inertia rotor you may be able to autorotate from any speed/altitude combination, thoughts? Also I remember my flight instructor telling me that Bell built an experimental 206L LongRanger with massive weights built into the rotor such that the helicopter had NO low airspeed HV curve. It could autorotate to a safe landing from any combination of altitude and airspeed. I always thought that was interesting.

 

That is interesting. Bet they cost a fortune too. I wonder if that was the limiting factor to their production.

 

Actually it would be an extremely high rotor inertia system since its got so much weight at the tips.

 

I wonder how it controls yaw in a hover?

 

It looks as though it has a "rudder" behind the engine that just deflects whatever thrust is produced by the exhaust.

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Looks pretty stable in a hover, the lack of a tailboom and leverage means better crosswind performance I would guess. Too bad the cameraman has never heard of a tripod....

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If understand how this think works correctly it uses bypass turbine air or some type of compressed air out of the rotor tips. Neat... you could put a pressure accumulator (bladder) somewhere in the system that if power was lost would give you a few more seconds of thrust before RPM deteration began, that would make all the difference in the world....

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Ray Prouty wrote an article on this subject some years ago. Downloadable at the link below, click the green “Download” button at the site.

 

I think the last major effort in Tip-Drive Rotors was the Hughes XV-9A (See Below).

 

Tip-Driven Rotors By Ray Prouty

 

“Two of the most troublesome components in most helicopters are the transmission and the antitorque system. Getting rid of either or both to save weight and development headaches has long challenged helicopter designers. One of the most obvious answers is the tip-driven rotor. This has been tried a number of times; so far without much lasting success There are those who think it should be reconsidered.

 

We can trace the principle back 2,000 years to Heron of Alexandria, who used it to make a steam powered whirligig. By shooting gases out an aft-facing nozzle at the blade tip, a rotor can be made to spin like a rotary lawn sprinkler.

 

A variation of the scheme was first applied to helicopter designs in the 1930s when blade-mounted propellers were used to pull the rotor around. This configuration was also used in the da Vinci, a man­powered helicopter developed by the students at the California Polytechnic University at San Luis Obispo (Figure 3-1).

 

It was not until after World War II, however, that the more direct approach of using jet propulsion in one form or another was developed to an almost successful conclusion.”

 

 

 

Download: Tip-Drive Rotors By Ray Prouty

 

mcdonnel_hot_1.jpg

 

Hughes_XV-9A-1.jpg

Edited by iChris
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this is really really cool, i thikn someday all helicopters will be like this. I just wonder what happens if the engine stops?

 

You would autorotate like you would in any other helicopter. Like I mentioned before these helicopters are likely to have no H/V curve because of the heavy rotor tips which give it a very high inertia rotor system.

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http://www.tecaerome...ingles/RH-i.htm

A lot of info regarding past tip jet

 

86% of fatal helicopter accidents are due to tail rotor failures? huh?

 

Other than that one, there are some cool advantages to this type of tip rocket technology...basically it's a 2 or 3 engine ship depending on the number of rotor blades..

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What happened to those two Hugh's 500's that were converted to hydrogen peroxide jet tips? It did seem to solve a lot of problems, I remember they said they were very easy to fly and in the YT videos they could hover hands off.

If you will remember, there was a H2O2 powered jet pack that was all the rage in the late 60's early 70's time frame. Maximum flight time to fuel exhaustion...11 seconds. Endurance has been the bane of H2O2 propulsion designs.

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this is really really cool, i thikn someday all helicopters will be like this.

 

Unlikely, unless someone finds a way to reduce the ridiculous fuel consumption, and the noise level. Especially the latter will be hard...

Essentially, you have two rockets travelling in circles at nearly the speed of sound, creating a noise like you've never heard before. Tip Jets have been around for a long time, but so far every design study was eventually given up.

Edited by lelebebbel
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