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What's your FIRST thought as a pilot or student?


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How do you react? What's your FIRST thought? How do you feel? ...when you hear about, read about, or see a helicopter accident...whether fatal or non-fatal. I mean after thinking..."I hope everyone is ok" or "My condolences to the family"...How do you feel about your pursuit of... or profession in... the helicopter industry.

 

Is it...

 

I'm risking my life in this thing... :blink:

this is inherently unsafe... :angry:

why do I do this??? :huh:

This is happening more and more... :(

 

or

 

It's avoidable... :rolleyes:

I'll be fine... ;)

It can't happen to me... <_>

It won't happen to me... :P

What were the facts and causes??? :mellow:

 

What is your FIRST thought? (The thoughts above are only suggestions...try to describe what you actually think or feel)

 

I think my first thoughts are a mix between "what was the cause?", "was it avoidable?" and "this could've been anyone including me"...but I continue to look forward to my next lesson. In my case...I think of my family and the possibilities of leaving them pre-maturely, but I also believe that life must be lived despite fear and in faith. I also find confidence in the facts and the statistics regarding helicopter accidents. Bottom-line for me is...If we do all we can do...the rest is NOT in our hands...ofcourse that means ALL we can do.

 

Either way...this is a gut check for everyone...what do YOU think when you first hear the news???

Edited by zemogman
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First thing I think of is the pilot and his family.

 

Then, I look at what happened and why.

 

The I keep in mind:

It can happen to me.

It very well may happen to me.

And, what can I do to avoid an accident like this?

 

Never be ashamed of turning down a flight because you lack the experience. Be honest about what you are doing, and your limitiations.

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I think of the family and friends and what if it was MY family and friends and then I think, ok, I need to be on my A-game every single time I climb in, no exceptions. I also think that even though it FEELS like there are lot more accidents, in reality I just didn't hear about them before I became embedded in the industry. I will push on with my training, I love it.

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I think "Who screwed up?". And then I immediately think of my life long saying. "When it's your turn, it's your turn."

 

I've seen people on "no alcohol" prescriptions that had ONE beer and died. I've also seen a kid in a horrible roll-over car crash, he ended up in the passenger's seat halfway UNDER the car. Took us 35 min to cut him out of it. He was treated and released that night.

 

When it's your turn, it's your turn. No 2 ways about it.

 

Honestly what I think when I watch those videos is "I wish there were more GOOD helo vids. There are TONS of good pilots out there, but crashes get more views than a good pilot."

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Guest pokey

Its sad, its too bad, what happened? (in that order too) then aside from thinking about the family & friends, "flying is dangerous". But i still do it & dont think about it anymore once i'm in the air. Alot of things are dangerous, (i met a few girls that even fall into that catagory) ;) But? we dont let that stop us, HECK ! as soon as you step foot onto the floor outtah bed in the morning?--the WHOLE wold is out to gitcha ! :o

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Oh Sh..., er- Sadness. 39 years, and it still feels like I've lost a friend. We've chosen to do this, we share that particular personal inclination. Even if you've only "stirred the stick" once, you're different than you were before that flight, and so am I, we're connected by that experience. The world's a different place after you've seen it from the bubble.

Next, curiosity- what happened? While there are exceptions, my fellow aviators are intelligent and rational, and yet things went wrong this time, somehow. What can I learn from it?

I've made enough mistakes to know it could be me, unless I work very hard to make my mistakes as small and few as possible.

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I think to myself, even if there is a risk, i would rather die flying helicopters then be hit by a car when i walk out of a 9-5 office job :rolleyes:

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I think exactly like you, I read another heli accident that happened the other day in Alabama and the guy had 2,000 hours. I am very discouraged again, just the other day I had agreat day flying, we did a bunch of autos. I have about 40-50 hours and every time I here about an accident I feel like giving up. I know I have said things like if its your time to go its your time but I certainly don't want it to be sooner than it should be. Meaning what if I wasn't suppose to die this way and I hurried it along. I have three great kids and we do everything together I spend the most time with them, if it wasn't for me they would not get to there soccer games, bowling, school events, etc. I just feel like I don't wont to rob them of having a healthy life growing up with their real mother and father. They mean everything to me and if it means quitting heli lessons, I would do it for them. I would really like some advice before I surrender. I know on my other replys I talked pretty confident, but its just all this negative stuff that brings me down.

 

Rotorchic

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Rotorchic...

 

I know what you mean about family...I'd stop for them too...we'd both do anything for them...but if I stopped, it would be fear and that's no way to live. For me, as long as the negative is fear-driven I'm not planning to let it stop me...There are truly many other professions, hobbys and interests that are far more dangerous than flying helicopters...I don't even know if that's the way to compare it, but it's true.

 

None of us want to "speed up the process"...or invite calamity...but when I think about flying in the proper context and frame of mind...outside of the latest crash news...we are not inviting calamity anymore than a passenger on a commercial flight (how many people touch those engines), or a fire-fighter, or a police officer, or a construction worker...or even driving in Miami :P

 

I'll stop before this one gets too long...but I know how you feel...

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Rotorchic...

 

I know what you mean about family...I'd stop for them too...we'd both do anything for them...but if I stopped, it would be fear and that's no way to live. For me, as long as the negative is fear-driven I'm not planning to let it stop me...There are truly many other professions, hobbys and interests that are far more dangerous than flying helicopters...I don't even know if that's the way to compare it, but it's true.

 

None of us want to "speed up the process"...or invite calamity...but when I think about flying in the proper context and frame of mind...outside of the latest crash news...we are not inviting calamity anymore than a passenger on a commercial flight (how many people touch those engines), or a fire-fighter, or a police officer, or a construction worker...or even driving in Miami :P

 

I'll stop before this one gets too long...but I know how you feel...

 

 

GREAT POST ZEM.

 

Rotorchic: i dont have that same issue currently in my life, but you do have my respect for the courage you are showing your family.

 

 

as for me: Im new to this profession so i havent had my first thought per say....but i faced similar questions when i first bought my motorcycle or "chrotch-rocket" as the oldies may refer to it hahaha....but when ever i did hear the news about a good friend of mine who wrecked his bike one night and didnt walk away... i felt some what of a HUGE gut check but like ZEM. said and even my own mother said; If i never rode again then it would be out of fear and life isnt about fear but faith....and when it is my time to go i hope and pray ill be doing something i love.

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BLG...I rode a CBR900RR in 1993 and an FJ1100 before that totalling about 3 years...I personally knew 3 friends that died on bikes in that time frame and I knew about another 5 or 6 that died in the same time frame. It was always hard to get back on the bike...especially after a few close calls of my own. My bike got stolen and I never got another one...I'm glad for that because they are just toooo temping.

 

However...I do have to add that out of those...90% of them were "eating-crap", "hot-dogging" and/or excessively speeding (sometimes fleeing from the police) when they were killed. I never fled from the police but I did plenty of the other two. Thank God I'm alive...

 

BTW...my mom said encouraging stuff like..."keep riding that thing and your going to be next" ---- :o

Edited by zemogman
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Well I feel sad for those that won't see their loved ones again but know that time heals. I imagine that situation happining to myself and take comfort that all who know that I would rather die that way than most. I hope that I will it will not end up that way but I won't live in fear.I have seen too many friends pass on (mostly to car accidents at too young)and try always to live without regrets i.e. tell all you love them. Would it make me quit? Not a chance.

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