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The Most Life-Threatening Jobs

According to BLS data, the following jobs had some of the highest fatality rates for 2005:

 

Fishers and related fishing workers

Fatality rate (per 100,000 workers): 118.4

Average salary: $29,000 per year

 

Logging workers

Fatality rate (per 100,000 workers): 92.9

Average salary: $31,290 per year

 

Aircraft pilots and flight engineers

Fatality rate (per 100,000 workers): 66.9

Average salary: $135,040

 

Structural iron and steel workers

Fatality rate (per 100,000 workers): 55.6

Average salary: $43,540

 

Refuse and recyclable material collectors

Fatality rate (per 100,000 workers): 43.8

Average salary: $30,160

 

Farmers and ranchers

Fatality rate (per 100,000 workers): 41.1

Average salary: $39,720

 

Electrical power-line installers and repairers

Fatality rate (per 100,000 workers): 32.7

Average salary: $49,200

 

Truck drivers

Fatality rate (per 100,000 workers): 29.1

Average salary: $35,460 (for heavy or tractor-trailer drivers)

 

Miscellaneous agricultural workers

Fatality rate (per 100,000 workers): 23.2

Average salary: $24,140

 

Construction laborers

Fatality rate (per 100,000 workers): 22.7

Average salary: $29,050

 

Copyright 2007 CareerBuilder.com. All rights reserved. The information contained in this article may not be published, broadcast or otherwise distributed without prior written authority.

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The Most Life-Threatening Jobs

According to BLS data, the following jobs had some of the highest fatality rates for 2005:

 

(Snip)

 

Aircraft pilots and flight engineers

Fatality rate (per 100,000 workers): 66.9

Average salary: $135,040

 

(Snip)

 

Copyright 2007 CareerBuilder.com. All rights reserved. The information contained in this article may not be published, broadcast or otherwise distributed without prior written authority.

 

Who the Frack is earning "$135,040" flying helicopters? That number must be for 747 pilots at United after 30 years. I know one guy who makes over 100K but he is flying a G4 for a well known rich guy (name will remain a secret).

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Who the Frack is earning "$135,040" flying helicopters? That number must be for 747 pilots at United after 30 years. I know one guy who makes over 100K but he is flying a G4 for a well known rich guy (name will remain a secret).

 

People that fly here in oilrigs do...and overseas flying for a home grown company too.

Edited by volition
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Who the Frack is earning "$135,040" flying helicopters? That number must be for 747 pilots at United after 30 years. I know one guy who makes over 100K but he is flying a G4 for a well known rich guy (name will remain a secret).

 

Federal law enforcement Special Agent/Pilots are typically GS-13's with AUO (25% automatic overtime). Add haz duty pay to the equation and it's easy to earn between $120,000 and $140,000. If that person also happens to fly in the National Guard/Reserves (many do), add another $15,000 to $25,000.

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I think you might be surprised what some airline Capitan's make. The owner of our FBO is an overseas 767 Capitan for one of the major package shippers, been there maybe 12 years, just made Capitan last year. According to him (unverified) he made around 150k as a first officer, and is making in excess of 200k as a Capitan. His bonus check for signing their new contract was over 60k……… Pretty sure that is true cause I’ve swam in the pool that it bought!

 

That $135,000 figure is an “average” there had to be several well in excess of that amount.

 

Clark B)

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Clark,

 

If you "swam" in his pool, does that make you a "swami"

 

(In Hinduism, when one becomes a swami, one is considered to be liberated from material desires. Swamis have full control of their bodies, and are all-knowing. Many swamis no longer need to eat or sleep,)

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(In Hinduism, when one becomes a swami, one is considered to be liberated from material desires. Swamis have full control of their bodies, and are all-knowing. Many swamis no longer need to eat or sleep,)

 

In Americanism we call them a Flight Instructor. They are also liberated from material desires (having paid for flight training through eBay sales), they have full control of thier boddies (Fighting panic as students keep trying to kill them on a daily basis, and avoiding puking from students inability to obtain level flight), and most are all-knowing and will inform anyone of that fact within ear shot. Many Flight Instructors no longer eat or sleep either. Food is beyond thier meger means to obtain, and sleep is hard to find due to night sweats and terror dreams of the latest dumbass who tried to roll the helicopter at 10 feet. :lol:

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Bristol,

I’m not sure what it makes me Paul, probably just another hick from Indiana.

“Swami”….. I don’t think so….. according to my girlfriend, I have no control over my body, know very little, and all I want to do is drink, eat and sleep. <_>

 

I’ll be in Florida next week, we’ll discuss it over a couple cold ones. :)

 

Permison,

Ha, I like that, good answer :lol: :lol:

 

Clark B)

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I had a good fixed wing link, I will try to find it again, that showed many companies, like Brians list. I remember UPS/FedEx topped at about 11 yrs Capt. didn't matter the airframe, they were within a few dollars per month of each other. They topped at $14,000 ish per month, and based on about 70-80 flight hrs a month, if memory serves.

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I had a good fixed wing link, I will try to find it again, that showed many companies, like Brians list. I remember UPS/FedEx topped at about 11 yrs Capt. didn't matter the airframe, they were within a few dollars per month of each other. They topped at $14,000 ish per month, and based on about 70-80 flight hrs a month, if memory serves.

 

Still Fixed wing stuff. We rotor heads are never going to see that type of money. Sigh.....sux to be us.

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I was trying to remember the guy that was around here that "said" he was corp and made Mid 100's in heli's.

 

I would like to know how accurate this survey is?

Salary.com

2001 link

 

I took this from another forum. I think if I was gonna do the fixed wing scene, I would go major cargo.

 

Why some passenger pilots switch to flying cargo

 

COREY DADE

 

June 2, 2006

 

The Wall Street Journal

 

Kevin Smith saw his pilot friends at Delta Air Lines rattled when it filed for bankruptcy last September. So when the pilot union at Mr. Smith's employer, AMR Corp.'s American Airlines, started cost-cutting talks several weeks later, he decided it was time to look for a new job.

 

In December, the 42-year-old Mr. Smith landed in the cockpit at United Parcel Service Inc., where he flies cargo planes packed with boxes - and is paid 74 percent less than the $100,000 a year he made at American. Even though it will take Mr. Smith four years to work his way back to his old paycheck, he is willing to endure it in hopes of holding on to the things that used to make being an airline pilot so alluring: job security, advancement and steadily rising wages.

 

''Guys who flew commercially (once) looked down on guys who flew freight,'' Mr. Smith says. Now, though, ''I've got my buddies at Delta, Northwest and United calling me.''

 

The turbulence that has led to $38 billion in combined losses since the start of 2001 for the six largest hub-and-spoke passenger airlines in the U.S. is causing their pilots to flood major cargo airlines with job applications - even as contract negotiations are heating up between pilots and cargo airline management. FedEx Corp. had 14,000 applicants for the 420 pilot slots it filled last year, while UPS picked the 233 new pilots it hired from 10,000 applications, including 8,000 from passenger pilots.

 

FedEx and UPS did 28 percent of all pilot hiring at major U.S. airlines last year, up from 8 percent in 2004, according to AIR Inc., a pilot-placement firm in Atlanta. Smaller cargo carriers also are expanding, including Kalitta Air of Ypsilanti, Mich., which flies 14 planes, up from three in 2000.

 

Pay concessions at passenger carriers, including Northwest Airlines last month, have pushed annual base pay for their pilots with five years on the job down by 7.5 percent since 2000 to about $81,500. The most-experienced senior captains have seen their pay shrink 12 percent to about $180,744 a year. In contrast, five-year cargo pilots now make an average of $108,330 a year, while top captains are paid $194,566.

 

Click Here!

 

The reversal in the pilot pecking order reflects surging global freight demand that is filling cargo planes with everything from computers to toys to flowers. FedEx and UPS, which operate the world's two largest cargo airlines, made about $22 billion in combined profit since the start of 2001, and more growth is expected as they expand their delivery networks in China.

 

But the diverging fortunes of the two pilot groups are fueling labor strife at several unionized cargo carriers, where management insists that pay levels should reflect the downturn in pilot wages and employment at passenger airlines. Union leaders claim that FedEx, UPS and other growing cargo carriers are trying to use the financial crisis at passenger airlines to deprive cargo pilots of well-deserved increases in pay and benefits.

 

Thriving cargo airlines such as FedEx's ''not only have the ability to pay, but the ability to pay very easily,'' says David Webb, a FedEx captain who is chairman of the Air Line Pilots Association unit at the Memphis, Tenn., company. FedEx and the union are in their eighth month of federally mediated contract talks after 17 months of negotiations on their own failed to yield an agreement.

 

So far, it looks like the cargo carriers have much more leverage than their pilots. Last September, pilots at Atlas Worldwide Holdings Inc., which is merging the crews of subsidiaries Atlas Air and Polar Air Cargo, went on strike - but returned to work two weeks later after agreeing to a raise in line with the Purchase, N.Y., company's original offer.

 

Atlanta-based UPS and the union representing its 2,700 pilots started contract talks four years ago. Efforts to reach a deal on a new contract hit a snag again last month when union board members rejected a recommendation from their own negotiating committee, causing an indefinite recess in the talks. The union's board ''is in a state of dysfunction,'' Tom Nicholson, president of the Independent Pilots Association, told UPS pilots in a recorded message. The split centers on a proposed pay scale as well as retirement bonuses for pilots hired when UPS launched its airline in 1988 and who now are approaching retirement age, according to people familiar with the situation.

 

Mr. Nicholson told members last week that the union and UPS are ''working together in good faith'' in informal discussions at the direction of the mediator. However, UPS spokesman Mark Giuffre said this week that ''we've not been instructed or directed by the National Mediation Board to conduct any formal or informal negotiations with the union at this point.''

 

UPS and union officials declined to comment on the specifics of the talks, citing a media blackout imposed by the mediator. The pilot union has said it wants pay raises that are consistent with recent revenue growth rates at UPS, without disclosing specifics. In the first quarter, UPS's revenue rose 17 percent to $11.52 billion.

 

UPS says its pilots make an average of more than $175,000 a year, while the union says pilot pay is about $168,000 annually. The union has said the two sides are about $40 million a year apart in their contract talks.

 

Meanwhile, four-year contract proposals by FedEx and its pilots differ by about $100 million, according to union official Wes Reed, who is coordinating pilot demonstrations outside Kinko's shops owned by FedEx. FedEx spokesman Maury Lane says the company has offered more than $500 million in raises and signing bonuses that would boost average yearly base pay 14 percent to $208,000 from $182,428. FedEx's current pilot pay is among the highest of any U.S. airline.

 

Except for seats and flight attendants, cargo and passenger planes are basically identical. But cargo pilots pass through different security checkpoints than passenger pilots and board planes parked at out-of-the-way hangars. Most freight moves at night, meaning cargo pilots can make outbound and return flights on a shift entirely in the dark.

 

Flying at night is ''not one of my favorite things to do,'' says Steve Hunter, who started flying at Atlanta-based UPS last year after 20 years at US Airways Group Inc. He recently bid for a seat on routes to Asia and Europe with more daytime flying.

 

Mr. Hunter, 50, took a $104,000-a-year pay cut to join UPS. ''We burned through a tremendous amount of savings'' before his annual pay was bumped up to about $75,000 - still less than half his peak earnings at US Airways. He says the sacrifice was worth it because he isn't worried anymore that his job could vanish before he reaches retirement age. ''Now we're plugging along,'' he says, ''working my way back up.''

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I'm not agreeing with that list. Coal miners, and us hose jockeys aren't on it at all.

 

It's more dangerous to work in a scrap yard than it is to walk into a burning building? :huh:

 

Sure, Farmer's are always getting tangled up in PTO shafts, Fishermen get yanked into the sea, construction workers get bonked on the head, but no firefighters or coal miners?

Edited by Fastlane
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Still Fixed wing stuff. We rotor heads are never going to see that type of money. Sigh.....sux to be us.

 

I think you'll be pleasantly surprised in the next decade or so. Even as we speak there are real aviators making that kind of coin. It will be much more common than it is at present.

Several caveats- Not all autorotationally impaired pilots make flag carrier pay, and the same holds true for real aviators.

The competition for good jobs will be, as now, intense.

It will take effort to aquire the bona fides to compete.

The top will approach the bottom as the pool of old far...- er, that is, "experienced" pilots becomes smaller. Minimums for hire will actually be applicable to the successful candidate. The days of having many candidates with multiples of the minimums are rapidly disappearing, if they're not already history.

It won't be any easier to get from "X" (license) to "Y" (rated) and "Z" (500, 1000, 2000) hours and journeyman status.

 

Finally, the other jobs on the list are inherently hazardous. We control our risk, and can be enormously successful in making the job safer. PHI, and some other helicopter operators, have had years where the accident statistics compare favorably with the airline's much vaunted numbers by supporting conservative pilot decision and actions. Pilot error accounts for somewhere between 75 and 90% of accidents. No matter what the boss says he wants me to do, I'll die if I screw up. I can get another job if I have to leave this one to survive.

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After 11 years of Truck Driving I made $52,000 in my last year driving. I think I should have been closer to 60k. Wal-Mart drivers can make over $70,000 the 1st year but keep in mind they hire drivers that have plenty of safe driving experience though I imagine there are exceptions. For them 90K is not unheard of. I think the the average for truck driving is low because the turnover rate at most large over the road companies is close or more than 100% turn over, which means no one stays anywhere long enough to see much of a pay increase.

Now, I talked to a guy when I was home last month who worked for Rotor Craft Leasing and he said he made 106K last year. He said he does works the 2 week on/off shift but instead does 3 weeks on and one week off. I guess that extra week of over time makes a big difference. He flies an S76 and had been with RCL for 3 years and is happy. It seemed resonable to me. In our discussion he never said anything that me made question his honesty. What do yall think?

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Wal-Mart drivers can make over $70,000 the 1st year but keep in mind they hire drivers that have plenty of safe driving experience though I imagine there are exceptions.

 

I have a good customer that drive's for Wal-Mart. He won't say what he makes, he drives part time. He said that the top paid driver at his warehouse runs $90's per year, but lives on the road. He was just in the shop today wanting me to consider coming to work for the local Wal-Mart Truck Shop.

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I have a good customer that drive's for Wal-Mart. He won't say what he makes, he drives part time. He said that the top paid driver at his warehouse runs $90's per year, but lives on the road. He was just in the shop today wanting me to consider coming to work for the local Wal-Mart Truck Shop.

 

 

Funny, people knock Wal-Mart for not paying well but their drivers are at the top pay in the industry AND they treat them extremely well. I talked to bunch of drivers because I was thinking of applying with them and every driver was happy...that or they were lying...but back to helicopters and not trucks LOL

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I'm not agreeing with that list. Coal miners, and us hose jockeys aren't on it at all.

 

It's more dangerous to work in a scrap yard than it is to walk into a burning building? :huh:

 

Sure, Farmer's are always getting tangled up in PTO shafts, Fishermen get yanked into the sea, construction workers get bonked on the head, but no firefighters or coal miners?

 

 

You definitely have a dangerous job but it looks like they base the danger level on this list by fatality numbers. So I guess it's a good thing your job isn't on it?

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  • 3 weeks later...

CR's post under the utility forum had me going back to this thread. Just more fun with statistics, specific to long-liners. The full report is here. It's almost a decade-old study and the numbers are fairly small to begin with, but that rate of 67 per 100,000 for all pilots looks pretty good compared to the rate they found for Alaskan long-liners in logging (about a 3% risk for a fatal accident per year, if you count the data through 1994 that lowers the risk).

 

Statewide occupational injury surveillance in Alaska through a federal-state collaboration was established in mid-1991, with 1992 being the first full year of comprehensive population-based occupational fatality surveillance for Alaska. During the time these incidents occurred, an estimated 25 helicopters in Alaska were capable of conducting long-line logging operations; approximately 20 were single-engine models from one manufacturer (Federal Aviation Administration {FAA}, unpublished data, 1993). Approximately 50 helicopter pilots were employed in long-line logging operations in southeastern Alaska (FAA and Alaska Department of Labor, unpublished data, 1993). Using these denominators, the events in this report are equivalent to an annual crash rate of 16% (six crashes per 25 helicopters per 18 months), 0.24 deaths per long-line helicopter in service per year (nine deaths per 25 helicopters per 18 months), and an annual fatality rate for long-line logging helicopter pilots of approximately 5000 deaths per 100,000 pilots (four pilot deaths per 50 pilots per 18 months). *** In comparison, during 1980-1989, the U.S. fatality rate for all industries was 7.0 per 100,000 workers per year; Alaska had the highest overall occupational fatality rate of any state (34.8 per 100,000 per year) for the same period (4).

 

According to NTSB investigations to determine probable cause, all six crashes involved "...improper operational and/or maintenance practices" that reflected a lack of inspections of long-line helicopter logging operations (1). In incidents 4, 5, and 6, investigative evidence also indicated that log loads routinely exceeded weight and balance limits for the aircraft. Following increased inspections, no additional logging-related helicopter crashes were reported through June 30, 1994.

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