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What is your “intraday” checklist.


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#1 RisePilot

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Posted 17 November 2017 - 06:01

If you are flying a machine after it has already been flown that day and had someone do the full “A-Check” prior, what is your personal quick checklist.

 

Of course the obligatory check of the scroll-fan nut and stripes (R44) with before/after photos should always be done.  But what does your intraday check & walkaround consist of?


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#2 Thedude

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Posted 17 November 2017 - 07:28

A full preflight like normal.
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#3 r22butters

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Posted 17 November 2017 - 10:38

If someone else flew it, I still do a full pre-flight!

However, while on a rather long cross country once where we had to stop many times for fuel, I did abbreviate a bit after each fill up. Basically, a look at the gearbox levels, belts, and walk around to see if anything is sticking out, or puddled beneath!

,...and of course check the fuel! :)
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#4 RockinRob

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Posted 17 November 2017 - 10:40

Kick the tires and light the fires boy!

 

I run the same machine all day each day. I will do a full pre and post flight each morning/evening, and stop every 3-4 hours to add oil and take a quick peek.


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#5 Azhigher

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Posted 17 November 2017 - 19:27

Every preflight is an additional layer of safety, and I don't trust another pilot to catch the thing that's going to kill me soooo, I'd just do a full preflight. 


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#6 HeliHunter

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Posted 18 November 2017 - 13:32

 Of course the obligatory check of the scroll-fan nut and stripes (R44) with before/after photos should always be done.  But what does your intraday check & walkaround consist of?


Okay this one confuses me, if I come out and the scroll-fan nut is out of wack, I am not flying it period. That indicates a massive overspeed, or something wrong. You do realize that the rotor/engine can overspeed and show no indication on there right? So why would there ever be a need to take a picture?

Doing that for the Tail stinger makes more sense. A scrape doesn't necessarily make it un-airworthy but that the previous person was messing around.


But I agree with everyone else, if it's you first time flying the machine for the day then do a full check, unless you trust that person with your life, because that is what it comes down to. But we are human and even honest people make mistakes/miss things.
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#7 RisePilot

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Posted 18 November 2017 - 17:49

In Europe, the PIC for the first flight of the day must enter their confirmation of performing a full “A-Check” with their license number in the tech log for the first flight of each day.  I’m just curious as to other’s checks regimes for later flights of the day (even when you piloted the previous leg).

I always perform a thorough A-Check for my first flight.  Following behind another pilot on same day) it will vary with who the given pilot was.  If I fly somewhere for lunch, I do not do a full A-Check an hour or two later when I’m done eating.  I do have a general abbreviated check I do for subsequent flights.  Example, I don’t really need to do a fuel sample of the tanks as it’s quite unlikely condensation will have accumulated in the short time I was eating lunch.

As for the photo of the scroll fan nut; you do this so that should someone fly the same machine after you and overspeeds, you have proof it was not you. 

I’m an R44 private owner with both EASA/FAA licenses and have attended the Factory Safety Course in Torrance - been flying for many years; not looking to take shortcuts


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#8 SBuzzkill

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Posted 20 November 2017 - 15:19

I think I understand what you're asking and it sounds similar to our procedures in the US Army.  We essentially have three levels of checks/procedures that can be done on a given day.

 

If you're the first flight of the day the checklist specifies doing the fuel sample, HIT checks on run-up, deceleration checks, etc.

 

If the aircraft has flown earlier you can skip the fuel sample, HIT check, and deceleration check.

 

If you have flown the bird yourself we have an abbreviated "through-flight" checklist that you can use which is basically a quick check of fluids and visual inspection of the aircraft.  It also cuts out a lot of the runup procedures since the equipment was already set up during the flight prior.  It saves a lot of time if you are just stopping to refuel on a long cross country or something like that. 

 

So I suppose that's similar to what you're asking about?  My personal list of things that I check in addition to the required checks will vary depending on the situation. 

 

Edit:  These procedures apply to the OH-58 airframe, I assume it's similar in other airframes but can't say for sure.


Edited by SBuzzkill, 20 November 2017 - 15:20.

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#9 Wally

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Posted 20 November 2017 - 18:11

How detailed my inspection will be of an aircraft before I fly it depends a great deal on the EXACT circumstances.  The small ship maintenance chief at one base I flew out of regularly called my preflights a daily annual inspection...

 

Start with the maintenance record (log book, ALWAYS!!!!).

Talk to the pilot who flew it that day, if it's someone I know well and TRUST a great deal, my check might be fluids and obvious damage.  Mostly I look the whole aircraft over in this process.

 

Otherwise it's my personal preflight, look at everything, grab it and if it requires/allows push/pull/twist, it gets it. Rock the aircraft to see if fluid moves in the sight glass or is it a stain. I carry small disposable inspection mirrors, and use a flash light for some checks.  A familiar aircraft type and with inspection stands convenient, it adds between 5 and 10 minutes to the bare naked preflight card.

 

Twins run to the longer side of the list, there is more to check, and one must get out the RFM for W&B stuff.

 

The idea is to KNOW what is what before you takeoff.

 

The maintenance log book is your FRIEND, read it.


Edited by Wally, 20 November 2017 - 18:13.

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Just a pilot (retired, so I have a LOT of time)...


#10 RisePilot

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Posted 21 November 2017 - 07:39

I think I understand what you're asking and it sounds similar to our procedures in the US Army.  We essentially have three levels of checks/procedures that can be done on a given day.

 

If you're the first flight of the day the checklist specifies doing the fuel sample, HIT checks on run-up, deceleration checks, etc.

 

If the aircraft has flown earlier you can skip the fuel sample, HIT check, and deceleration check.

 

If you have flown the bird yourself we have an abbreviated "through-flight" checklist that you can use which is basically a quick check of fluids and visual inspection of the aircraft.  It also cuts out a lot of the runup procedures since the equipment was already set up during the flight prior.  It saves a lot of time if you are just stopping to refuel on a long cross country or something like that. 

 

So I suppose that's similar to what you're asking about?  My personal list of things that I check in addition to the required checks will vary depending on the situation. 

 

Edit:  These procedures apply to the OH-58 airframe, I assume it's similar in other airframes but can't say for sure.

 

Yes, this is what I'm asking.


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