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Why do you want to be a military aviator?


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This section has been pretty slow lately, maybe we can give it a jump start.

 

I've been curious lately about people's motives for wanting to become a military aviator. Are you attracted to the aircraft? Getting paid for flight training? Just want to be in the military? A dream since you were a child? Just want to challenge yourself?

 

I'm not looking for your WOFT packet essays (unless, of course, that's what you want to post). I'd rather not have your political answer, if you know what I mean. Just the straight honest truth.

 

For me, I hated going to my college classes every day and working towards a degree I had no intent on using. I had been trying to get through flight training by working flight line, and I ended up not even being able to afford my PPL without taking out another loan.

 

Watching guys come in every day and go out to the aircraft, fire it up, and head off over the horizon was driving me nuts. I wanted to be doing that, not sitting out there in the rain pumping gas and pulling planes in and out of hangars.

 

Air Force/Navy/Coast Guard were out, as I didn't have a degree and had no real desire to get one. I was forcing myself through school because I thought it was my only option. Found out about WOFT while doing some reading, and decided to look into it more.

 

I'd never desired to be a helicopter pilot, don't ask me why. But I read as many books as I could pull off the shelves on Army Aviation and before long it was all I could think about. Since I was young I wanted to be a military aviator, I just never thought I'd be a chopper pilot.

 

The aircraft fascinated me, the missions I was reading about fascinated me, and finally the training sucked me in. By training I mean all the stuff you go through before flying. Crawling around in the dirt, shooting guns, pushing myself. It all sounded awesome to me.

 

I will admit, there are some things I did not anticipate. It's impossible to understand military life without actually living it. There are little things during the day that I could have never forseen. And there are bigger things too, like having to do a stack of paperwork every time I want to take some time off. All in all, though, I love it and wouldn't change a thing.

 

So that's my story, what's yours?

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My grandfather was a B17 pilot for the Army during ww2. My father retired as a Colonel in the USMC as a fighter pilot. I have wanted to be a military aviator my whole life. Literally.

 

However, I wore glasses since 5th grade, and back in 1998 no one accepted vision correction. So I became a civilian commerical pilot and CFI.

 

2007 came around, and I discovered the WOFT program, and how PRK would be accepted. I lost 75 pounds, got PRK, finished my packet in winter 2009. Got accepted Jan 2010, and boom fast forward to today, a week from starting the 58 course.

 

I chose 58s cause I wanna shoot people in the face.

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I'm not looking for your WOFT packet essays (unless, of course, that's what you want to post). I'd rather not have your political answer, if you know what I mean. Just the straight honest truth.

 

It just makes sense. Plain and simple. I have 6 years and 11 months TIS already, want to retire from the military either in a reserve or active capacity and figure what cooler job to have than being an aviator. The WOFT program whether through the USA/USAR/ARNG, from what I'm aware, is the most direct way to becoming a pilot in the military. You don't need a college degree or ANY prior aviation experience. You tell that to anyone in any other branch besides the Army (and even to some in the Army) and they won't even believe you the majority of the time.

 

Now, having that said, I wouldn't recommend anyone attending a board have it go down anything like this: "So, Sergeant, why do you want to be an Army Aviator?" "Well, Sir, I think it'd be really cool and it just makes sense." :lol:

 

There are two types of answers to any kind of interview, I don't care what it is for; political and real life. Let common sense guide you in that. :ph34r:

Edited by Marine4WOFT
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I used to use orange for EPs, green for limits, yellow for warning and caution messages. I hope you're studying those by the way, you're going to need to know the entire list of warnings and caution messages. Memorize everything that's not info/system status that way if you don't recognize one you know what it is.

 

I can almost garuntee you will see a few caution messages while flying.

Edited by SBuzzkill
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I have read it cover to cover about 10 times. I could pass a written 5&9 test right now. Right now i am trying to get all the notes, cautions, and warnings verbatim. Now I will start to memorize all the warning and caution messages. Thankfully I know a good chunk of them already.

 

Oh, our flight will be the first one taking systems tests that count. Joy.

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For me, I hated going to my college classes every day and working towards a degree I had no intent on using. I had been trying to get through flight training by working flight line, and I ended up not even being able to afford my PPL without taking out another loan.

Really glad to read that I'm not alone in this feeling.

 

It's disparaging to read that most of the people who post their stats have achieved eagle scout, bs degrees and the like. I took a number of college courses, getting A's in my physics/engineering/math/english classes. However I had a hard time staying interested in the asian religion/art history classes. I worked throughout school to pay my way and chose to take a semester off because not doing well in the "extra" classes was ruining my transcripts. I've since worked 8 years at different a few different jobs from retail, to land scaping to working in a hospital monitoring heart rhythyms 3rd shift (present). I've always preferred a good day of useful work helping people to a day of listening to a professor talk about the differences between dynasties.

 

I've always been interested in military aviation, the earliest stories of my dad (passed) being an Army mechanic on UH-1s. I don't feel I'm the best candidate on paper, but given the opportunity to fly and train to expertly support soldiers on the ground, I can't help but try.

 

69.1% of WOFT applicants were selected last year. I might end up in the 29.9% still sitting at home, but atleast I'll know that those selected were better than me to someone at the point the decision was made.

 

If chosen, I'll be living my dream life. Have to try for that.

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This section has been pretty slow lately, maybe we can give it a jump start.

 

I've been curious lately about people's motives for wanting to become a military aviator. Are you attracted to the aircraft? Getting paid for flight training? Just want to be in the military? A dream since you were a child? Just want to challenge yourself?

 

I'm not looking for your WOFT packet essays (unless, of course, that's what you want to post). I'd rather not have your political answer, if you know what I mean. Just the straight honest truth.

 

For me, I hated going to my college classes every day and working towards a degree I had no intent on using. I had been trying to get through flight training by working flight line, and I ended up not even being able to afford my PPL without taking out another loan.

 

Watching guys come in every day and go out to the aircraft, fire it up, and head off over the horizon was driving me nuts. I wanted to be doing that, not sitting out there in the rain pumping gas and pulling planes in and out of hangars.

 

Air Force/Navy/Coast Guard were out, as I didn't have a degree and had no real desire to get one. I was forcing myself through school because I thought it was my only option. Found out about WOFT while doing some reading, and decided to look into it more.

 

I'd never desired to be a helicopter pilot, don't ask me why. But I read as many books as I could pull off the shelves on Army Aviation and before long it was all I could think about. Since I was young I wanted to be a military aviator, I just never thought I'd be a chopper pilot.

 

The aircraft fascinated me, the missions I was reading about fascinated me, and finally the training sucked me in. By training I mean all the stuff you go through before flying. Crawling around in the dirt, shooting guns, pushing myself. It all sounded awesome to me.

 

I will admit, there are some things I did not anticipate. It's impossible to understand military life without actually living it. There are little things during the day that I could have never forseen. And there are bigger things too, like having to do a stack of paperwork every time I want to take some time off. All in all, though, I love it and wouldn't change a thing.

 

So that's my story, what's yours?

 

Thanks for sharing your story! Some people never find their path, but finding, pursuing, and finally walking down it is a worthy accomplishment. You should be proud.

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Ditto.

 

Typical young boy obsessed with military aviation. Of course, 99% of the books and tv/video I was glued to were fixed wing. After all... who doesn't love fighter jets? But I loved them all. General aviation, commercial aviation, all generations of military aviation around the world, historical aircraft, experimental aircraft, ect. My father was a private pilot and took me up in rented Cessnas occasionally. Those flights around scenic southern Utah really sparked my interest in the joy of flight. Not the same as the desire to be a pilot or an Army Aviator. That desire came as I realized it would be a good 'in between' career that would help me pay for finishing my degree and give me the monetary stability to start a family.

So there's an honest answer. I get to fly something cool and get paid to do it. Once in a while I experience 'the joy of flight' while airborne. The Army does its best to eliminate that, but it does happen.

Also, before I enlisted in the Army I went to see an Air Force recruiter for a near by ANG unit and didn't even get past the gate. They wanted to know if I had an appointment and their attitude was anything but helpful. I kind of wanted the 'Army' experience anyway. Another consideration was service to country. I was single when I joined and my brothers were busy serving the nation by raising good kids. (a worthy service) I figured I could represent the family in the military.

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I want to be an Army Aviator because there are always going to be those who have to fight for our country and I have an overwhelming desire to help them. I want to fly Medevac. I know it might sound funny because, in turn, I would end up being one of those people, regardless of what airframe/mission I am given. I grew up always doing whatever I could to do help people. I was heavily involved in Search and Rescue. I have always loved, loved aviation and helicopters in particular. I have read every single Army Aviator memoir from Vietnam ever published. Several times. I want to serve alongside those who are willing to do anything and everything for a cause greater than themselves. And, if given the opportunity, I want to be the one to take them out of harms way when the call for help comes over the radio.

 

That's all.

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I want to be an Army Aviator because I think helicopters are the neatest thing on planet earth! If i had to fly fixed wing I would be pissed, that's why I choose Army WOFT so there's a minimal chance of getting fixed wing. I want to fly low nap of the earth with the doors off and fire machine guns at the enemy. I want to be able to fly in the most remote areas day or night and to the extreme. I want to do it being warrant officer and not a commissioned officer because warrant officers get all the REAL time. I want to become an artist and perfectionist at flying helicopters. I'm almost finished with the packet and when i graduate Purdue i will submit my packet over and over until i get accepted. It's been a lifelong dream of mine to fly for the military and with PRK it can be done. Also i chose the Army because i want to support the guys on the ground, I want to be part of the fight to help support the soldiers in boots. I feel that to be close air support like helicopter pilots are, you must be a soldier first. That's why I like the Army and that's why I want to be a Army Warrant Officer Aviator.

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I want to be an Army Aviator because I think helicopters are the neatest thing on planet earth! If i had to fly fixed wing I would be pissed, that's why I choose Army WOFT so there's a minimal chance of getting fixed wing. I want to fly low nap of the earth with the doors off and fire machine guns at the enemy. I want to be able to fly in the most remote areas day or night and to the extreme. I want to do it being warrant officer and not a commissioned officer because warrant officers get all the REAL time. I want to become an artist and perfectionist at flying helicopters. I'm almost finished with the packet and when i graduate Purdue i will submit my packet over and over until i get accepted. It's been a lifelong dream of mine to fly for the military and with PRK it can be done. Also i chose the Army because i want to support the guys on the ground, I want to be part of the fight to help support the soldiers in boots. I feel that to be close air support like helicopter pilots are, you must be a soldier first. That's why I like the Army and that's why I want to be a Army Warrant Officer Aviator.

 

Excellent! Remember that enthusiasm after you finish at Ft Rucker.

 

I wouldn't mention this if you hadn't said you are anti fixed wing. But you did so I have to tell you that Close Air Support is an air force/fixed wing task. It's a small doctrinal difference, but what we do is actually called Close Combat Attack.

 

The ground troops love us because we have much, much lower danger close ranges. The fighter guys do good things way up there in the stack and they carry way bigger warheads, but there isn't much place for big warheads in this environment. We, apaches and kiowas, are a lot closer to the fight. Kiowa guys fly really low and do really good recon work, but I much prefer the situational awareness tools and accuracy tools of my apache.

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