Jump to content

Tips for beginner pilots


jackjack
 Share

Recommended Posts

So I've had a few flights now, but can't quite seem to get it all under control. Able to hover a little bit. Can hold a somewhat steady hover sometimes indef sometimes not at all. Having lots of problems with the approach. I just don't feel like it's connecting for me. I understood going into this it would be difficult but I feel as if I'm not progressing as I should be.

 

What I'm asking from all you experienced guys is, do you have any tips or advice for beginners such as myself? How about a website that offers these types of things. Been looking but haven't found anything yet. Also have been talking to different instructors but I just want to hit this from as many angles as possible and become the best pilot out there. So any help would be great! Thanks in advance

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Have you spoke with your instructor about your issues? He/she is your first line of help when it comes to learning to fly. Ask your instructor what you are doing wrong and/or let him/her know what problems you are having. Maybe you just need to go over some more ground with your instructor to better understand approaches and how to properly fly them.

 

You mentioned you were only a few flights into your training and that you can "somewhat" hold a hover. You definitely shouldn't be discouraged about making approaches yet. Give it some time. It will all come in.

 

Talk with your instructor though. That is why he/she is there ; To help you get through your helicopter rating. Good luck!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm not sure if this has been posted before, but I just found this great site with a lot of useful information written in easy to understand language (unlike most textbooks out there). I think you will find it most useful to you as a beginning student. Here is a link to the "Helicopter Flight Information" section of the site:

 

http://helicopterflight.net/toc.htm

 

Whatever you do, do not give up. At first everything seems impossible, but you will learn it all in good time and you'll look back wondering what all the fuss was about :-)

 

Update: I have updated the link above that includes much more information. I also would like to second the recommendation of Kodoz's site (link in his post below). Lot's of information from a very knowledgeable guy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The first couple hours is almost always tough. Stick with it, and don't be discouraged. And ya, like Ragman said, talk with your instructor about your concerns. He will be able to help you break through the slump, or show you that you are not failing or behind the curve.

 

Remember, everyone learns at different rates. I've had students who hovered in the first 30 minutes, and students who took 6 hours to hover. Hell, I was even told about a student (albeit in his 70s) who had 80 hours and had yet to solo.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What I'm asking from all you experienced guys is, do you have any tips or advice for beginners such as myself? How about a website that offers these types of things.

 

Yeah, I had that idea: wikiRFM. My website is for guys like you who are looking for tips and advice, and for instructors to share their experience. Likewise, if you find something that works for you as a student, you can add it so other instructors can add it to their repertoire.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If flying a helicopter was easy, everyone would do it! :) The first several hours are always the hardest so don't let it get you down. The FAA min might be 40 hours but average is about 60 - 70 hours for a PPL. Be sure you understand the backside of the power required curve and how it affects making an approach.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Like everyone says the first flights are the hardest and you shouldn't get down on yourself. A few simple things you can do. Loosen your grip on the cyclic, most new students keep a death grip on that thing and it makes it hard to feel how it moves and how the helicopter moves. Also, keep your eyes outside and keep your movements small, really small. Other then that...listen to your instructor and relax. Sometimes it's tough when you are learning but if you relax you can process the information coming in better. You will get it for sure... it just takes time. Stay at it and good luck.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

While your instructor is your first line of information, be aware that each instructor has their own strong points and their own weak points. So asking others can help you fine tune your skills. Very light touches on the controls is all that is needed. I tell my students that to handle the controls, they only need to have thoughts about having fantasies about moving the controls. As for hovering, look at a point off in the distance. It will steadier than a close in point and help smooth out your handling.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Like they say RELAX, ( easy to say harder to do ) as Dboy says if it was easy!.

Looking well out on hover will make things easier, looking at the grass under you will give false sense of movement,your natural response is to look close in,When I was learning I nearly chucked it in because there was no way was I ever going to get there, the first solo was like a dream come true along with a scare but the training kicked in and it was a non event in the end.

It was the most difficult thing I have ever done, there were times that talking required more brain than I had to spare, 2 of us learnt in winter every one was bundled up we were in shirt sleeves sweating like the proverbial.

The Feet were the most problem, kept forgetting the things.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So any help would be great! Thanks in advance

 

Like most areas, you will get mixed reviews...but I believe you can benefit from sim time in your early hours...say less than 20 hours TT. It helps you figure out how all the controls interact and the basics...Beyond that, it's probably not very useful until you get to instrument work.

 

On the approaches just check your altitude and rate of descent. Should be 500AGL, then 400 on base, 300 starting final. Try to hold your descent rate at 500fpm, but dont slow down too much! If you start slowing down then the descent rate goes back to zero! See, told you a sim would help!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Flying helicopters is as easy as walking. Believe it or not, learning to walk took each of us a considerable period of time, especially compared to learning how to fly a helicopter. The problem each of us has is not the process itself, it's our unrealistic expectations of the simple process. It will take time. It will take practice. Your success will depend on your intelligent involvement as you work at it.

Once it starts to 'click' for you, and you find the 'hover button', you also need to remember that just because you can walk (as it were), don't expect to be able to move, to 'dance', like Balanchine. That takes a lot more work and talent.

I don't have a lot of experience teaching, but I do remember learning, and those memories are VIVID. My experience is that if I did it, anybody can, with applied practice and analysis.

 

If it's any comfort, I've been flying helos since 1968, have better than a hundred thousand landings (I stopped counting years ago), and the same fundamentals that were a challenge as a student continue to be the key now. I still abort operations, "shake it out" and intentionally relax the muscles, analyze my mistakes in order to finish whatever I'm doing successfully- just like I did pre-solo. Then, when I'm done, I analyze and critique so I might be able to do it better next time.

 

The only universal truth is the hardest of all for students- slower is always better, unless you're en route.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think that being optimistic is the best way to approach flying helicopters. I don't nearly have the flight experience as Goldy and Wally, but I do know that things that may seem (and probably should be) simple can be a pain in the butt. I still find myself practicing straight and level flight, level turns, and all that other stuff that probably should be second nature by now.

 

I look at flying like I look at the dating game in your younger days, some days you have it and other days you don't.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...