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SFAR 73 Awareness Training Video - feedback please


Jay Bunning
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Hi all,

 

I have been working on a project to produce free training videos for helicopter pilot students. The idea is that these videos complement, not replace ground school training. They are for the student to watch before the lesson and then come to ground with questions & a level of understanding - so that the ground session can be more productive by delving deeper and be more of a discussion, checking understanding on a topic.

 

I'd really appreciate feedback on my attempt at an SFAR 73 Awareness Training video:

 

 

Many thanks - I appreciate and respect all of your feedback and comments.

 

Jay

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slow-clap-gif.gif

 

Great video! I'll definitely be subscribing to your channel. The videos remind me of Khan Academy, which may be helpful for ideas to enhance your videos (even though its already an excellent presentation). One thing he does is draw over the videos while he's explaining things, which keep the viewer more engaged. That is my only feedback, but I think what you are doing is great just the way it is. There isn't enough free material out there on helicopters, so this is a massive contribution!

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Subscribed!

 

Well done! I do agree with trying to liven it up a bit though. The best way I can think is to add some deflection to your voice, get passionate about it, even if it's fake.

 

Also, isn't it 80% + 1% for every 1,000' DA not MSL?

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Subscribed!

 

Well done! I do agree with trying to liven it up a bit though. The best way I can think is to add some deflection to your voice, get passionate about it, even if it's fake.

 

Also, isn't it 80% + 1% for every 1,000' DA not MSL?

 

It is indeed 80% plus 1%/1k ft DA.

 

To the OP, great video.

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Hey Jay- nice job! I actually watched it all the way through, and I usually *never* watch those sorts of things all the way through. Couple of teensy suggestions...

 

1. Talk more slowly. I know, I know, talking for 20 minutes is a bitch, especially unscripted. And there was a ton of material to cover. But really, force yourself to slow down just a bit, especially that beginning part. Love your delivery though - very listenable. Why is it we Americans like a British accent? I could probably listen to you read the dictionary to me...all the way to zyzzogeton (is that even a word?) without falling asleep (too many times).

 

2. It's "Federal AVIATION Regulations." Probably ought to go back and fix those.

 

That is all. Good job, nicely done :)

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That's just what we were taught, which is why I asked. If I was taught wrong, I'd like to know.

 

But think about it, DA affects every aspect of flying, not just MSL altitude. When you're calculating hover heights by the POH... find weight, go up to temperture = max hover height in pressure altitude... You might be looking at PA, but the temp turns it into DA without telling you. Same thing with your performance calculations.

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That's just what we were taught, which is why I asked. If I was taught wrong, I'd like to know.

 

But think about it, DA affects every aspect of flying, not just MSL altitude. When you're calculating hover heights by the POH... find weight, go up to temperture = max hover height in pressure altitude... You might be looking at PA, but the temp turns it into DA without telling you. Same thing with your performance calculations.

 

Yeah, DA makes sense, but it would be nice to see it in an actual textbook or POH reference!,...just to make it official. :)

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It's not MSL because you can be at 2,000 feet MSL and still be at sea level Density Altitude. I believe it's pressure altitude.

 

 

80% +1% / 1,000’

 

This inflight rule of thumb (an approximation) was intended in reference to the aircraft’s altimeter set to the current reported altimeter setting. When you’re inflight, such rules of thumb should not require you to make any adjustments or calculations to find PA or DA. It’s altitude directly from the altimeter.

 

http://youtu.be/UUitj7NRJBo

Edited by iChris
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I'm not trying to start anything but doesn't your altimeter read in pressure altitude once set? Which then translates into MSL?

 

Your altimeter reads pressure altitude when set at 29.92. When set at the present extrapolated pressure at sea level, it reads indicated altitude, which should be within 75ft of true altitude.

 

I am sure that other guys can say/explain it better, but that was my attempt at it...

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Your altimeter reads pressure altitude when set at 29.92. When set at the present extrapolated pressure at sea level, it reads indicated altitude, which should be within 75ft of true altitude.

 

I am sure that other guys can say/explain it better, but that was my attempt at it...

 

When set to the "local setting" it reads "true" altitude (MSL), which should be within 75' of "field elevation" when on the ground.

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Your altimeter reads pressure altitude when set at 29.92. When set at the present extrapolated pressure at sea level, it reads indicated altitude, which should be within 75ft of true altitude.

 

That's correct...

 

 

 

I'm not trying to start anything but doesn't your altimeter read in pressure altitude once set? Which then translates into MSL?

 

 

Pressure Altitude is the indicated altitude when an altimeter is set to an agreed baseline pressure setting. The baseline pressure (International Standard Atmosphere ISA) is 1013.25 hPa, equivalent to 1013.25 millibar, or 29.92 inches of mercury.

 

Only on a standard day when the altimeter is reported as 29.92 will the following apply:

 

PA=DA=MSL (less installation errors)

 

Follow the Standard Atmosphere line:

Pagesfromcsp-FF-1_i1r9p.jpeg

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Jay,

 

Interesting video. A couple of notes. First the graphs would be easier to look at if they were in focus.

 

Second, as defined by Websters

 

Invent: to produce (as something useful) for the first time through the use of the imagination or

of ingenious thinking and experiment.

 

I personally don't define what Frank Robinson did as invention. He designed and he developed the R22. But the helicopter itself was already invented and the systems that Frank used had also be already developed. Frank took his knowledge of the industry and the systems used and put them together into the R22. So as defined by Websters, Frank really didn't invent anything. It would be like, if I have a flash of inspiration and put together various ideas to make a tri-powered ultra light car, that uses human power, solar power and hydrogen power. Did I invent the tripowered car? not really. I designed and developed it though. This is not to take away anything from Frank, it took a great deal of thought and energy to do what he has done.

 

Lastly, this has been argued on both of the the sites. Military pilots are not necessarily better trained than civilian pilots. They are trained differently and they have different skill sets than civilian pilots. The US Military when through many cases of mast bumping during the early years of the Huey. It was not a well know problem at the time and not well understood. The Army was asking the Huey to do things that it was really designed for and doing them in ways that were never considered during the Huey's development.

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