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Helisuccess.......success?


Whiteshadow
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So, I am about halfway through Commercial right now, and going to Helisuccess in a few weeks. What is the best thing that someone in my stage of career do for myself at the event? I understand that at my current stage it is more about just getting my face and name out there. What else can I do now, that will benefit me later?

 

Thanks!

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Dress nice, talk lots, act professional, relax, and have fun. Don't show up late, wear jeans and T-shirt, curse like a sailor/ use a lot of slang ect.

 

It is a networking event, make your first impression count

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Whiteshadow,

 

Be sure to introduce yourself to me. I will introduce you to everyone else while we are shoulder to shoulder. I will invite you to my C&E Seminar in Broomfield, Co. on Nov. 10th.

 

This VR group will get together during the event for a few cold ones. Join us please for that.

 

At the end of my FAASTeam presentation I always put up a Bonus slide about attending seminars, expos and events.

 

It states the three "I"s:

Information, Interaction & Inspiration

 

It shows to make a written "Get & Give" list. Write down what you want to get from attending and what you could give to those you make contact with. You are valuable to everyone even at an early point in your career/training.

 

Those of you presenting resumes to employers, be prepared for the "Give" question of "What will you bring to XYZ Helicopters?"

 

I will probably be handing you your name badge, so say Hello!

 

Mike

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Make connections now (It will be less stressful since you are not expecting to get a job), make a good impression, get business cards from everyone you meet and keep in touch! LinkedIn or email or phone if you really hit it off -- Drop a note once in a while to say how you are doing, what you are up to, and by the time you are qualified for that job they will already know you.

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+1 on all of the above, be as social as possible without annoying anyone. Collect emails from key players & write them after the event to cement yourselves in their memory. Follow up periodically to maintain the relationships. Listen carefully & take notes.

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Do not squander the many opportunities.. i do this every year with HeliExpo.. i just sign up and go.. and then because i don’t get organized BEFORE i get there, i miss much of the things i need to see.

 

Sooo, go to the link below and look at the schedule and presenters, make all of it if you can, but if not, make a priority list of the things you are most interested in. KNOW THAT, unlike HeliExpo, the people that will be here attending and presenting are APPROACHABLE!! They are there because they want to give back, because they care about you and our industry. If there is someone that you really want to meet, ask one of the folks involved to introduce you, or, just walk up and introduce your self.. do not be shy, and if you are, fake it and get over it, this is an amazing opportunity to get to know people and more importantly, get them to know you. One of my favorite quotes from the last few years is; ‘it’s not only who you know in this business, but who knows YOU!’.

 

https://www.justheli...33/Default.aspx

 

 

If there is a section/speaker that you aren’t so interested in, do not go to your room or leave the hotel, take that time to meet with someone that you ARE interested in meeting, or get your resume looked at, or both. If you are really focused on a job or career path, find the folks that are there from that venue and take them to lunch, or ask to sit down with them during their free time.. you might even go to dinner with them.

 

Do not assume the person you are speaking with, or sitting next to isn’t somebody, you will be amazed who is there and who is behind the scenes just watching. last year one of the most respected speakers and one who has helped countless people in many ways was serving water to everyone at the job fair.. (LOL, shaking my head and smiling, one of the most accomplished people i’ve ever met and one of the most humble).. you NEVER know who you may meet and how they might help you if you make a good impression. You also will never know how much damage you can do if you make a bad impression.. so, if you plan to bring a bad attitude, or an ego, better that you just stay home until you get over it.. YOU CAN NOT FOOL THESE PEOPLE.

 

On that subject, resumes; do not bull sh*t us, we will see thru it and your CV will end up in the round file (and in our memory banks when someone else calls for a reference).. and keep in mind that just because we don’t have a spot for you, that doesn’t mean we don’t know who does.. last year i (and others) spent the week after HeliSuccess placing people in positions that made good impressions on us.. not because i got anything out of it except to better our industry and help PLU (people like us). I also helped place other people thru-out the year that i met at this event.. just saying.

 

Although i get Eagle’s comment about Whiteshadow’s resume being pointless at this point i will add this: I have always said that the flying is the easy part, there are a lot of pilots out there with the proper certs, but we want to know what else you bring to the table, what is your background and what other experience you might have. The last CFII that i hired from HeliSuccess didn’t have anything to do with his flight training, yes he had the required time and certificates, but what i was interested in was the rest of his experience.. i see resumes from folks that stick with me for years, even those that don’t have the time that we need.. but i keep them in a file for when they do get that experience.. :-) If someone calls me looking for the right person, i just might know who they are. I also have trouble remembering everyone, and it’s so nice when someone calls and says they are visiting in a week or so when i can pull their resume and get to know them again before they show up. Making business cards is a GREAT idea, even if they don’t say super pilot or anything but your contact information, we meet many people and need a way to remember them. Hand them out to everyone.. everyone.

 

Gotta tell you a true story here; One year at the Expo i took a friend’s resume to the job fair with me because he couldn’t make the event, i was a newly minted private pilot with less than a hundred hours, i stood in line at one of the most prominent EMS companies, a long line, and when i got to the gentleman that hires MORE EMS PILOTS THAN ANYONE ELSE IN THE INDUSTRY, i handed him Mike’s resume.. (Laughing out loud right now remembering the look on is face), i told him what i was doing and that i thought that one day he would hire this guy.. he thought i was crazy, and told me so, and then said, ‘he doesn’t have enough time and, EVERYONE wants to fly EMS in Colorado!’, I said yes, but this guy is not everyone and you want him on your team. He hired him a year later and he’s now in a supervisory position in his home town... his dream job in his dream city!!! NEVER underestimate the power of networking, and think out side of the box.

 

Do not miss the job fair, and when you are standing in line, look around at the other tables, if the line you are in is long, find one that isn’t and go talk with the folks there, even if you don’t want an EMS job, those folks are PLU and they might be with another company in the future.. get to know everyone you can.. hand them a business card or a resume and ask them if they know who might need someone with your skills, then go back to the table with the long line after it’s shorter. DO NOT RUN OUT OF BUSINESS CARDS OR RESUMES.. TAKE A TON.

 

If your spouse is coming along, take he/she with you and introduce them to everyone you meet as well, we love to know that you are supported by those very important people.

 

Do have your resume looked at by the pros, it’s free and they have great insight.. do ask them if you can get something for them after, coffee, water, lunch, a milkshake, what ever, these folks are there working for free and sometimes never get a break cuz they are there for you.. and you wouldn’t believe who they are and their background.. :-)

 

Be NICE, and patient, and have no ego.. :-) the person you are sitting next to might have 30K hours.. you are not there to impress anyone, but to learn, network and GIVE BACK! I like Mike’s comment about asking what YOU can do for the people you meet.. how can you help THEM, how can you further their career? Who can you connect them with that will help them and the industry as a whole ?! Trust me, it will come back to you.

 

oh yeah, what ^^ everybody else said.. all of it...

 

all of the above are of course my very humble opinions..

 

sincerely,

 

dp

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At this point handing out resumes would be rather pointless, so (if you haven't already thought of it) print up some business cards. That way the people you talk with might remember you some day, if they can place your card with the conversation you had with them?

 

Use Vistaprint. They a quite inexpensive at about $10 for 250 card and have a template to design your own cards. I have used them for year and have been quite please.

 

There are things you can and will bring away from this seminar, is how to prepare a proper resume. I have been a chief pilot and have seen some extremely poor resume. Why would I not hire such a person? If they can not take the proper care of their career and their job search, how can they be expected to take proper care of the the equipment they and ultimately I am responsible for?

 

You will also have the chance to network with others that were in the position you are currently in. They will tell you about their trials and tribulations. But most of all it is contacts and networking.

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Do not squander the many opportunities.. i do this every year with HeliExpo.. i just sign up and go.. and then because i don’t get organized BEFORE i get there, i miss much of the things i need to see.

 

dp

 

Geez DP, I thought I was all ready to go, now I've got tons to do!! Can't wait to see you guys again...

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Lots of great advice so far, keep it coming. I had never thought of the business card idea, but I think it's great. I have used vistaprint before, and the prices and quality are excellent. I do have a couple of specific companies in mind that I want to make sure to talk to, so I will try to strategize properly to make sure that happens.

 

DP, thanks for the great detailed post. I agree with everything you said, and plan to follow your guidelines. Anyone that knows me knows I don't have any issues with being shy, or having a bad attitude (at least I hope they do). I plan to be myself, which is a guy with a lot of plans and goals, and a completely irrational sense of optimism! Haha, (which I think is what it takes to make it in this business).

 

Thanks again everyone for contributing.

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This is exactly the kind of information and motivation that is needed in this industry, especially for the less experienced pilots looking to join the ranks of the commercial world (myself included.) I wish I could make this Heli-Success seminar my first. I have a few pals from the Bend, Oregon, region that will be making their way down for the weekend. If you any of ladies or gents come across them, welcome them into the crowd! Listen for the, "Leading Edge Aviation" school! Hope the event is a blast, and hopefully next round I can make it out and meet some of you fine ladies and gents!

 

- Ragman

Edited by RagMan
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It has been said; lots of the entry level conversation will revolve around ADM, SBT, SMS, along with the other alphabet soup of acronyms. With a firm belief knowledge should be shared and, if there is a possibility of this type of discussion popping up, it may be advised to prepare…. Here is a couple links to a brief, brief…

 

http://www.faa.gov/library/manuals/aviation/pilot_handbook/media/phak%20-%20chapter%2017.pdf

 

http://shebleaviation.com/study-materials/SRM.pdf

 

Beyond that, what else could a pilot do to set him or her apart from the mass of other job seekers at an event such as this? What about….

 

Dress for success; always dress as professionally as possible. This doesn’t necessary mean a suit, but a suit helps. Either way, make darn sure, the color of your belt matches the color of your shoes (no joke). Plus, if you buy your suit at the Good Will thrift store, buy your shirt, belt and shoes at Target or Wal-Mart, and your tie at Kohl’s or JCP. And, by all means, tuck your shirt in. I can’t stress enough how important tucking in your shirt is……

 

Get a hire cut; Dad was right… Today’s hairstyles can run the gamut. The problem comes when people believe their hair is an avenue to “express their personalities”. Don’t do that. If your hair is that important to your identity, express yourself after you get hired….

 

Leave the bling; just like hairstyles, wait to be hired. This includes piercings….

 

Suck on a mint; fresh breath needs no explanation. No gum….

 

Go easy on the cologne/perfume; while we all like to “stink good”, it can be overwhelming and an instant turnoff. This includes you ladies. Too much of a good thing is just that, too much…..

 

Eye contact; when speaking to people, look them in the eye. Not only will this instill trust, it will force you to pay attention even though you may not want to…

 

Show your perilee whites: smile and show what a great attitude you have cuz, great attitudes, are required..

 

Get a grip; shake hands with a firm grip should go without saying but if you’re in doubt, Google “professional handshake” and take note….

 

Treat everyone as a potential employer; you never know who you may meet and the guy who is sitting next to you in the bar the night before, may be the Chief Pilot you are seeking information from the next day…

 

Stay sober; in some circles, having a cocktail is a sign of confidence. Getting hammered is the kiss of death. Use your head while socializing and no matter how comfortable you are, know this, everyone is watching… And don’t believe the hype… Everything does not stay in Vagus…..

 

Be yourself as long as you’re sane; no one likes phony but everyone is afraid of a psycho…. Just relax, be yourself and have fun, with confidence…

 

Follow the paper; as a matter of necessity, bring a current resume, a copy of all of your certificates, and a simple (elegant) business card. Hand the resume out to potential employers. Hand the business cards out to everyone else… Keep everything together in a ready to access folder…..

 

Bring two pens; one for you to use and the other is for the Chief Pilot who forgot his……

 

Caution with thy mouth; learning happens by listening. The saying goes “he who speaks least, knows all”. And, stow the ego. During casual conversations, beware of “I” did this, or “I” did that, or me-me-me…..

 

When it comes time to open thy mouth, don’t be shy; whatever fear you have about “stranger danger” you’d better lose it. Nice guys finish last for a reason, and that reason is, they didn’t speak up when the time was right. Get a good rap together cuz you’ll need it to become the ultimate salesmen and the product you’re selling is you! Don’t be afraid to practice at home with a friend, family member or in front of a mirror. This is not a speech or a pitch. It’s more-or-less a conversational flow… This is where you can showcase your positive attitude…..

 

Locals only; even though you have experience in the field, you won’t know the entire lingo associated with that specific sector so don’t try to sound like you do. KISS, or Keep It Simple Silly……….

 

Research; know what companies are attending and find out as much as you can about them. One of those questions thrown your way may be “what do you know about our company?” Gulp…..

 

Learn; even though most will not be hired, don’t be afraid to ask, “What can I do in the future to work for your company?”

 

Last but not least, understand the most junior guy can make an impression. Therefore, don’t be afraid to get in line and speak with an operator even though you’re nowhere qualified. Simply put, a 286 hour CFII should go talk with the Phi folks and make yourself a known quantity. Make them want to be in contact with you…

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So, in short, to have success at Helisuccess, you must dress and act like a used car salesman? :lol: :lol: :lol: ,...f*ck'n aye :rolleyes:

 

Perceptions and comments like this will surely advance you along the career path!

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Spike, thank you for the great detailed reply. I love to see the experienced guys take so much time to give us newbies a hand.

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Spike- Great post...I especially believe in this one..."Treat everyone as a potential employer; you never know who you may meet and the guy who is sitting next to you in the bar the night before, may be the Chief Pilot you are seeking information from the next day…"

 

The only other thing I would add is that guy you are teaching who is a 20 hour student? He may also be your boss some day.....and so might your current co-worker...in fact, many pilots "move-on" and then you'll see 2 or 3 guys moving over with him/her....

 

As always, can't wait to see some of my old friends...

 

Goldy

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Goldy, more great info, thanks. I am learning every day how small this helicopter world is.

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Hey Goldy, I beleive I still owe you a beer. I was suposed to buy you one last year but missed the opportunity. Can't wait to meet all the VR folks again, it is coming up quick.

 

I'll collect on that debt! Just come up and remind me! (NBNC)...(no Bud, no Coors!)

 

See you there,

 

Goldy

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Follow the paper; as a matter of necessity, bring a current resume, a copy of all of your certificates, and a simple (elegant) business card. Hand the resume out to potential employers. Hand the business cards out to everyone else… Keep everything together in a ready to access folder…..

 

Does this just mean pilot's license and FAA medical or should I be thinking about something else?

 

I'm looking forward to meeting everyone. I mostly hang out in the military forum here but I'd love to meet up with any VR guys. This will be my first time at the event.

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Does this just mean pilot's license and FAA medical or should I be thinking about something else?

 

At minimum, copies of your medical, FAA certificate and ratings and, if you’re carded, a copy of that as well. Some people like to bring copies of training certificates but I believe these should be outlined in the resume. Plus, some choose to include copies of driver licenses, CDL’s and/or driving history which brings me to a story that highlights the significance of Goldy’s post….

 

At one of my first job interviews as a CFI, I brought along a DMV print-out of my driving history. Back then, to obtain one of these “print-outs” you had to stand in a long line at a DMV office and pay $5 which was a pain in the bootie. When I gave my paperwork which included the print-out to the Chief Pilot he grumbled, “What‘s this?” I told him it was my DMV print-out proving I have a clean driving record with no accidents or violations (i.e. responsible driver/person). He immediately crumpled it up and threw it in the garbage stating “I don’t need that!” Suffice it to say, I wasn’t hired….

 

Fast forward 3 years. That same school was looking for a Director of Op’s for their helicopter department (this was a sizable school with a helo, FW and Maintenance Departments/schools). With more experience under my belt I applied. This time I was offered the job by the VP and told him I would accept the job under one condition……… That “condition” was reassigned to the FW Department and I took the job…… The “condition” later left aviation altogether and became a Carnie…..

 

This isn’t the only time this kind of thing has happened to me. Therefore, without a doubt, maintain a high level of professionalism no matter who you’re dealing with…. ALWAYS....

Edited by Spike
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