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WARRANT OFFICER FLIGHT TRAINING

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Thank you for the post - it helps consolidate a lot!

 

I started my WOFT application with my recruiter this past week and when asked, he said that a fitness test wasn't a component of the packet. Basically he said that it doesn't occur until sometime after board selections. Can someone shed some light on this to prove him right or wrong? If the PT is part of the packet then I have a long way to go to be competitive on it, although I've recently started going to the gym a lot. Thanks

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Hey the only I can add to this amazing post is that the fixed wing slot is available to outstanding pilots at selection of advanced airframe. So fresoutfit of ierw you are able to compete for fixed wing slots if available.

 

I posted this awhile back, and apparently many people have found it to be helpful, so I am making a new thread, and will "bump" it every so often so it does not get lost in the shuffle. Maybe someone can ask a moderator to make it a "sticky" if people think that's a good idea.

 

I've been typing up a "guide" for WOFT applicants, since the lack of information (and the information that is available is so scattered) about this program is ridiculous. Apologies, it is very long, and some of it is incomplete. Here it is:

 

Disclaimer: I am merely another civilian trying to get picked up for WOFT. All the information posted below is what I have found through countless hours of research, talking to knowledgeable people, and by going through the process myself. Take everything with a grain, or two, or three, of salt. Double-check everything. If you read something below that doesn't sound right, ASK. Hopefully someone more qualified can pitch in with a better answer, or I will try to do more research and find a regulation that clears it up.

 

--------------------------------------------------------------

 

UNITED STATES ARMY – WARRANT OFFICER FLIGHT TRAINING

Flying for the U.S. Army is rather unique: all new aviators fly rotary-wing aircraft. While the Army does have several fixed-wing aircraft in its inventory, these are limited to seasoned and experienced aviators. Secondly, the Army is unique because Warrant Officer Flight Training (WOFT) contains a program casually called “street-to-seat” or “high-school-to-flight-school.” Civilians (college degree not required) may apply for this program. If selected, you sign a contract. If not selected, you have no obligation to the Army and are still a civilian. Sound easy? It’s not.

The WOFT Application Process works to eliminate those without the motivation to follow through. It is stressful, there are many components, and if flying for the Army is not something you really want to do, this is probably the time when you’ll figure that out…unless somehow everything works out perfectly for you. If so, I’m jealous.

 

As a civilian, the WOFT Packet consists of the following components:

ASVAB: Minimum 110 GT Score required. I used the ARCO book and got a 99 AFQT/139 GT Score, but apparently ASVAB for Dummies is highly recommended by many. Seriously.

AFAST: Minimum score of 90 required. Use the ARCO book, not the Barron’s book to study. Barron’s has entirely too many incorrect answers.

MEPS Physical: Your recruiter will schedule this for you, most likely in conjunction with your ASVAB test. Try to get this done as early into your application process as possible, so that you know if you are disqualified for something like color-blindness, which is non-waiverable for potential aviators.

Class 1A Flight Physical: While it is easier for your recruiter to schedule this, it is possible for you as a civilian to do it. If you have a lazy recruiter, track down the number of the local Army flight surgeon that would perform the flight physical. Note: this is NOT the same physical given by FAA-certified flight physicians (read: the civilian version will not replace the Army physical).

APFT: You must pass, but to be competitive, you must score very well.

Letters of Recommendation: For civilian applicants, a minimum of three and a maximum of six are required. The general rule is to select a combination of people who know you very well and can speak to your maturity, responsibility, and leadership abilities, and people who are in a high position of relevant authority. Ideally, these people would be one and the same, i.e. an Army Colonel you have known for 10 years. However, if you are like me and did not know anyone like that, do not be afraid to get into contact with an Army Aviator and ask them politely if they would be willing to interview you and perhaps write a Letter of Recommendation. Quite a few applicants do this; just make sure that not all of your Letters of Recommendation are of this nature.

Resume: This is your chance to shine and list your accomplishments without appearing like you are bragging. The resume is something you can start early and simply add to as you progress throughout high school and/or college. Take advantage of this time and do some unique and worthwhile things; they will help your resume stand out from the rest.

“Why I Want to be an Army Aviator” Essay: Straightforward: answer the question. 1 page. Write it early and simply edit it as time goes by.

¾ Length Photo: Don’t worry about this until the end of the application process. Ask your recruiter for details.

Educational Transcripts: The board will want official transcripts from high school through your most recent education level (i.e. Bachelors, etc). Obtain these ASAP so you don’t have to worry about it. This is also a hint that the board will look at your GPA, so be prepared to explain a low GPA, or you could always just focus on getting a solid one.

Professional Certificates/Flight Log (if applicable): If you have your Private Pilot’s License, are EMT-B certified, or something similar, include copies of your certificates. If you have logged significant flight time, make crisp and clear copies of your flight log.

SF-86 Form / Interim Secret Security Clearance: Your recruiter will have you fill out the computerized SF-86 form sometime during the process. This form asks you of your past history, and requires you list a lot of contacts/references as well as addresses of places you have lived and worked. Make it easier by printing out a copy of the SF-86 (easily available online) early on in the process and filling it out ahead of time, so you aren’t stressing out in the recruiter’s office because you can’t remember the address of a place you worked at five years ago.

Battalion Board Interview: This is the last major step in the process. Once your packet is completed, you will go before a “local” battalion board and they will interview you. Be prepared to answer standard interview questions (strengths and weaknesses, etc) as well as Army-specific questions (i.e. why do you want to be a Warrant Officer, what is your favorite Army value and why). The board will then rate you on a scale of 25 (some of which is based on appearance, apparent confidence level you exude, posture, etc), and send that rating along with the rest of your packet to Warrant Officer Recruiting Headquarters, who evaluates packets once every other month and makes the final decision. If you are selected, congratulations! Your recruiter will schedule you another visit to MEPS where you will find your dates and sign your contract. If you are not selected, you will be classified as either FQ/NS (Fully-qualified/Non-select, meaning your packet was complete but you were just not selected) or NQ/NS (Not-qualified/not-select, which usually means there was an issue with your packet). If FQ/NS, the board will automatically look at your packet again the next month. Again, if selected this time around, congratulations! If not selected, you are a twice non-select and must wait 6 months to reapply. Take that time to either examine other options if you cannot afford to wait six months, or build up your packet and resume if you are set on this path.

 

Some potential hurdles:

Eyesight: if your vision is worse than 20/50 in either eye or is not correctable to 20/20, you will be medically “disqualified.” There are waivers, so not all hope is lost, but the waivers will not extend to those who have extremely poor vision. If you fall into that latter category (your vision is utterly terrible, as mine was), you have two options: PRK or LASIK eye surgery. I will not tell you which one to pursue, only that in general, the military “prefers” PRK (though the Army accepts both), and that I chose LASIK with incredible results. Research each on your own (and very thoroughly), and if possible consult with an Army flight surgeon to ensure that the surgery you choose is acceptable. Also, make sure you obtain all paperwork required by the Army, as your civilian surgeon will need to fill them out regarding your pre-operative refraction, and post-operative results. This paperwork is required for the eyesight waiver you will put in. You must wait three months after surgery before you are allowed to schedule your Flight Physical.

Color-blindness: Sorry, if you are color blind then you are out of luck. MEPS will determine if this is the case.

Height: Look it up. I can't remember the regs, but they are out there if you look hard enough.

 

Incorrect/Incomplete packets will either get kicked back, or will be looked upon badly. It is up to YOU, not your recruiter, to ensure everything is in proper order.

 

Some other routes for getting to WOFT are:

Enlisting and then applying from within

ROTC

OCS (Officer Candidate School): While it is generally easier to get accepted to OCS than to WOFT as a civilian, there are very few (and I mean very, typically one to three at most per OCS class) Aviation slots in OCS, and there is no way to guarantee it. If you choose to go this route, you must be VERY prepared to serve in another capacity/branch of the Army. Do not go this route if you only want to fly. Strongly consider this route if your desire to serve in the United States Army as a Commissioned Officer is paramount to everything else. Keep in mind, however, that Warrant Officer Aviators can always choose to commission later in their careers.

USMA (West Point)

 

 

--------------------------------------------------------------

 

Hope this helps. Feel free to add/change/question things.

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Hey the only I can add to this amazing post is that the fixed wing slot is available to outstanding pilots at selection of advanced airframe. So fresh out of ierw you are able to compete for fixed wing slots if available.

 

I posted this awhile back, and apparently many people have found it to be helpful, so I am making a new thread, and will "bump" it every so often so it does not get lost in the shuffle. Maybe someone can ask a moderator to make it a "sticky" if people think that's a good idea.

 

I've been typing up a "guide" for WOFT applicants, since the lack of information (and the information that is available is so scattered) about this program is ridiculous. Apologies, it is very long, and some of it is incomplete. Here it is:

 

Disclaimer: I am merely another civilian trying to get picked up for WOFT. All the information posted below is what I have found through countless hours of research, talking to knowledgeable people, and by going through the process myself. Take everything with a grain, or two, or three, of salt. Double-check everything. If you read something below that doesn't sound right, ASK. Hopefully someone more qualified can pitch in with a better answer, or I will try to do more research and find a regulation that clears it up.

 

--------------------------------------------------------------

 

UNITED STATES ARMY – WARRANT OFFICER FLIGHT TRAINING

Flying for the U.S. Army is rather unique: all new aviators fly rotary-wing aircraft. While the Army does have several fixed-wing aircraft in its inventory, these are limited to seasoned and experienced aviators. Secondly, the Army is unique because Warrant Officer Flight Training (WOFT) contains a program casually called “street-to-seat” or “high-school-to-flight-school.” Civilians (college degree not required) may apply for this program. If selected, you sign a contract. If not selected, you have no obligation to the Army and are still a civilian. Sound easy? It’s not.

The WOFT Application Process works to eliminate those without the motivation to follow through. It is stressful, there are many components, and if flying for the Army is not something you really want to do, this is probably the time when you’ll figure that out…unless somehow everything works out perfectly for you. If so, I’m jealous.

 

As a civilian, the WOFT Packet consists of the following components:

ASVAB: Minimum 110 GT Score required. I used the ARCO book and got a 99 AFQT/139 GT Score, but apparently ASVAB for Dummies is highly recommended by many. Seriously.

AFAST: Minimum score of 90 required. Use the ARCO book, not the Barron’s book to study. Barron’s has entirely too many incorrect answers.

MEPS Physical: Your recruiter will schedule this for you, most likely in conjunction with your ASVAB test. Try to get this done as early into your application process as possible, so that you know if you are disqualified for something like color-blindness, which is non-waiverable for potential aviators.

Class 1A Flight Physical: While it is easier for your recruiter to schedule this, it is possible for you as a civilian to do it. If you have a lazy recruiter, track down the number of the local Army flight surgeon that would perform the flight physical. Note: this is NOT the same physical given by FAA-certified flight physicians (read: the civilian version will not replace the Army physical).

APFT: You must pass, but to be competitive, you must score very well.

Letters of Recommendation: For civilian applicants, a minimum of three and a maximum of six are required. The general rule is to select a combination of people who know you very well and can speak to your maturity, responsibility, and leadership abilities, and people who are in a high position of relevant authority. Ideally, these people would be one and the same, i.e. an Army Colonel you have known for 10 years. However, if you are like me and did not know anyone like that, do not be afraid to get into contact with an Army Aviator and ask them politely if they would be willing to interview you and perhaps write a Letter of Recommendation. Quite a few applicants do this; just make sure that not all of your Letters of Recommendation are of this nature.

Resume: This is your chance to shine and list your accomplishments without appearing like you are bragging. The resume is something you can start early and simply add to as you progress throughout high school and/or college. Take advantage of this time and do some unique and worthwhile things; they will help your resume stand out from the rest.

“Why I Want to be an Army Aviator” Essay: Straightforward: answer the question. 1 page. Write it early and simply edit it as time goes by.

¾ Length Photo: Don’t worry about this until the end of the application process. Ask your recruiter for details.

Educational Transcripts: The board will want official transcripts from high school through your most recent education level (i.e. Bachelors, etc). Obtain these ASAP so you don’t have to worry about it. This is also a hint that the board will look at your GPA, so be prepared to explain a low GPA, or you could always just focus on getting a solid one.

Professional Certificates/Flight Log (if applicable): If you have your Private Pilot’s License, are EMT-B certified, or something similar, include copies of your certificates. If you have logged significant flight time, make crisp and clear copies of your flight log.

SF-86 Form / Interim Secret Security Clearance: Your recruiter will have you fill out the computerized SF-86 form sometime during the process. This form asks you of your past history, and requires you list a lot of contacts/references as well as addresses of places you have lived and worked. Make it easier by printing out a copy of the SF-86 (easily available online) early on in the process and filling it out ahead of time, so you aren’t stressing out in the recruiter’s office because you can’t remember the address of a place you worked at five years ago.

Battalion Board Interview: This is the last major step in the process. Once your packet is completed, you will go before a “local” battalion board and they will interview you. Be prepared to answer standard interview questions (strengths and weaknesses, etc) as well as Army-specific questions (i.e. why do you want to be a Warrant Officer, what is your favorite Army value and why). The board will then rate you on a scale of 25 (some of which is based on appearance, apparent confidence level you exude, posture, etc), and send that rating along with the rest of your packet to Warrant Officer Recruiting Headquarters, who evaluates packets once every other month and makes the final decision. If you are selected, congratulations! Your recruiter will schedule you another visit to MEPS where you will find your dates and sign your contract. If you are not selected, you will be classified as either FQ/NS (Fully-qualified/Non-select, meaning your packet was complete but you were just not selected) or NQ/NS (Not-qualified/not-select, which usually means there was an issue with your packet). If FQ/NS, the board will automatically look at your packet again the next month. Again, if selected this time around, congratulations! If not selected, you are a twice non-select and must wait 6 months to reapply. Take that time to either examine other options if you cannot afford to wait six months, or build up your packet and resume if you are set on this path.

 

Some potential hurdles:

Eyesight: if your vision is worse than 20/50 in either eye or is not correctable to 20/20, you will be medically “disqualified.” There are waivers, so not all hope is lost, but the waivers will not extend to those who have extremely poor vision. If you fall into that latter category (your vision is utterly terrible, as mine was), you have two options: PRK or LASIK eye surgery. I will not tell you which one to pursue, only that in general, the military “prefers” PRK (though the Army accepts both), and that I chose LASIK with incredible results. Research each on your own (and very thoroughly), and if possible consult with an Army flight surgeon to ensure that the surgery you choose is acceptable. Also, make sure you obtain all paperwork required by the Army, as your civilian surgeon will need to fill them out regarding your pre-operative refraction, and post-operative results. This paperwork is required for the eyesight waiver you will put in. You must wait three months after surgery before you are allowed to schedule your Flight Physical.

Color-blindness: Sorry, if you are color blind then you are out of luck. MEPS will determine if this is the case.

Height: Look it up. I can't remember the regs, but they are out there if you look hard enough.

 

Incorrect/Incomplete packets will either get kicked back, or will be looked upon badly. It is up to YOU, not your recruiter, to ensure everything is in proper order.

 

Some other routes for getting to WOFT are:

Enlisting and then applying from within

ROTC

OCS (Officer Candidate School): While it is generally easier to get accepted to OCS than to WOFT as a civilian, there are very few (and I mean very, typically one to three at most per OCS class) Aviation slots in OCS, and there is no way to guarantee it. If you choose to go this route, you must be VERY prepared to serve in another capacity/branch of the Army. Do not go this route if you only want to fly. Strongly consider this route if your desire to serve in the United States Army as a Commissioned Officer is paramount to everything else. Keep in mind, however, that Warrant Officer Aviators can always choose to commission later in their careers.

USMA (West Point)

 

 

--------------------------------------------------------------

 

Hope this helps. Feel free to add/change/question things.

Edited by ErOk_OnE

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Roger that, Eli! Thanks!

 

Now, what the hell are you doing up at 3 in the mornin'?

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Thanks for the post Lindsey! I began my packet last week and when asked, the recruiter said a fitness test wasn't part of the packet; something that is done sometime after board selections. He seemed pretty confident saying it. Can someone verify if he is right or wrong? Thanks

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Thanks for the post Lindsey! I began my packet last week and when asked, the recruiter said a fitness test wasn't part of the packet; something that is done sometime after board selections. He seemed pretty confident saying it. Can someone verify if he is right or wrong? Thanks

 

It is a requirement for the packet.

 

Here is a link to see how the scoring is done:

http://usmilitary.about.com/od/army/a/afpt.htm

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One thing you should add in there is finding a quality recruiter, even if it means driving a couple towns over. I think a lot of people feel obligated to work with the first recruiter they talk to. This is not the case!! Find someone you work well with and that you feel will work hard to get you in. If they have a plan of action the first time you meet them and set goals for you it's probably a good bet they are going to do a good job :)

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Hey can anyone tell me how they score the AFAST? I just got started and cleared my ASVAB now i just picked up the Peterson's AFAST study guide it has practice test's but how do u know if it is a 90 or a 150.

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he said that a fitness test wasn't a component of the packet. Basically he said that it doesn't occur until sometime after board selections.

LOL, now that's a new one...

Edited by Marine4WOFT

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SBuzzkill is right about the recruiters. The first one I went to told me to come back when I had everything ready to submit. I drove to a different one last week and he is going out of his way to help me. Take some time and find one like that and this process won't be nearly as stressful....Thank you SFC Ament. If you're in NC and can get to High Point you might want to give this guy a call!!!

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LOL, now that's a new one...

 

Haha, yeah...I figured there was something wrong with what he said seeing as nearly EVERYONE going WOFT mentions it. Can anyone shed some light as to when and where the fitness test takes place in the application journey? I have a lot of work to do in the body department :P

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Haha, yeah...I figured there was something wrong with what he said seeing as nearly EVERYONE going WOFT mentions it. Can anyone shed some light as to when and where the fitness test takes place in the application journey? I have a lot of work to do in the body department :P

Anytime, preferably a few times to get the highest score possible for your packet. On this website there are countless testimonies of PT scores being highly scrutinized during boards...

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Lindsey,

 

Definitely alot of good information there. I would just add the the CH-47 Chinook is the sexiest aircraft in the US Army inventory. Other than that, looks good! :D

 

 

CHAD

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Hey the only I can add to this amazing post is that the fixed wing slot is available to outstanding pilots at selection of advanced airframe. So fresoutfit of ierw you are able to compete for fixed wing slots if available.

 

I'm sure it's slim, but I believe you can get selected/slotted for fixed wing without any previous flight experience. One of my friends from WOCS is coming back for a fixed wing slot this September. He was an enlisted crew chief beforehand.

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You aren't selected for anything until you're through IERW unless you're Reserves or Guard.

 

He is National Guard, hasn't been to IERW and is down here at Rucker for a fixed wing slot.

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Lindsey,

 

Definitely alot of good information there. I would just add the the CH-47 Chinook is the sexiest aircraft in the US Army inventory. Other than that, looks good! :D

 

 

CHAD

 

LMAO, do all 47 guys use this same line!!!!

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LMAO, do all 47 guys use this same line!!!!

 

I'd venture to say that the -47 is so ugly it's almost sexy. Except the MH-47. For some reason, the -47 painted black is just HOT. I mean, very cool-looking. ;)

 

All that said, the -47 is battling for my number one choice of airframe.

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All that said, the -47 is battling for my number one choice of airframe.

 

Same...There are no 47 slots for WOJGs right now, unless you are NG of course. Its been about a year since any were available, they are rumored to be coming back soon but in very small numbers.

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A couple selections ago there were 2 slots for active duty warrants, a D slot and an F slot. A good friend of mine got the F and is in class right now. They are there, just rarely.

 

There were none in our selection, and only 1 Apache and 2 Kiowas. The rest were 60s with one 60M slot.

Edited by SBuzzkill

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